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OF 



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~&**f- 



*GEORGE*CHAMPLIN*MASON* 









^> 







REV. JAMES HONYMAN. 



ANNALS 



OF 



Trinity Church, 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 



1698-1821. 



George Champlin Mason. 




GEORGE C. MASON, 

NEWPORT, R. I. 

i8go. 



The Evans Printing House, 

Fourth and Library Streets, 
i'lm.ADrxriiiA. 



1805017 



At a meeting of the Vestry of Trinity Church, held August 28th, 1888, 
the following action was taken : 

"The Vestry, having learned that the Senior Warden, Mr. George 
C. Mason, has written the Annals of Trinity Church, covering the most 
interesting periods in its history : Voted: that a committee be appointed 
to extend to Mr. Mason an invitation to publish in book form the mate- 
rial he has collected with so much assiduity, and to take such steps as they 
may deem expedient, to raise by subscription the means necessary to carry 
out the wishes of the Vestry, as here expressed ; that body having no 
power to appropriate money for this purpose." 

Voted: That the Rector and V. Mott Francis, M.D., be that com- 
mittee. 

Geo. C. Mason, Esq. 

Dear Sir : Having received by subscription the amount which you 
deemed necessary for the publication of the Annals of Trinity Church, 
Ave desire to carry out the wish of the Vestry of the Church, as expressed 
at their meeting, held on the 28th of August, 1888, and ask you to pro- 
ceed to the work of publication. 

Very sincerely yours, 

G. J. Mag ill, 

Newport, Dec. 12th, 1889. 



, Committee. 
V. Mott Francis, 



PREFACE. 

This volume, prepared as time and opportunity offered, is a transcript 
of the records of Trinity Church, Newport, Rhode Island, from its in- 
fancy at the close of the Seventeenth Century, down to Easter Monday, 
1 82 1, and covers the most interesting periods in its history. With the 
text, which is given with fidelity, there are copious explanatory notes and 
short sketches of the men who, in their day and generation, were in some 
way connected with the Church. 

In the earliest book of records there are gaps, the result of inexper- 
ience on the part of those who kept them, and which now cannot be 
filled. A more serious loss was that of a volume, covering the years just 
preceding the Revolution and the time the British troops were on the 
island. When the war broke out the minister was the Reverend George 
Bisset — a good and faithful pastor, who had evidently entered upon his 
duties as his life-work. In common with other clergymen of the Church 
of England in America, at that date, he held that allegiance was due to 
the king, and remained on the island when the enemy took possession, 
preaching to the troops as he had preached to his own people. When 
the British left he went with them. It is probable that not knowing with 
whom to leave the record book he took it with him for safe keeping, and 
in this way it was lost. The other records have been preserved. While 
they are of great value, particularly to those who have occasion to search 
for confirmation of marriages, baptisms and deaths, there does not appear 
to be anything in them to warrant the printing of minutes of a later 
date than are here given. 

The edition is limited to three hundred and fifty copies. 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 




D 



CHAPTER I. • 

1698-1719. 

OWN to the closing years of the seventeenth 
century no footing had been obtained in 
America by the Church of England, nor had 
any attempt been made in New England to gain one, 
till May 30, 1686, 1 when the liturgy was read in public 
for the first time in Boston. Ten more years elapsed 
before there was much promise of a church there. 

Rhode Island was even more backward. The 
founders of the State, and the first settlers of the island 
of Rhode Island, were Baptists, who were divided among them- 
selves ; and when Quakerism was introduced it met with great 
success. Here was the field the Quaker had looked for, but which, 
till then, he had not found ; here there was no persecution, no whip- 
ping at the cart-tail, or other methods to extort obedience to spiritual 
rulers. The heads of the people, the Coddingtons/Cranstons and 

1 The Rev. Robert Radcliffe came over in the ship that brought a com- 
mission for Joseph Dudley as Governor of Massachusetts, and landed in 
Boston May 15, 1686. He made application for a place in which to hold 
religious service, and was allowed the use of the library room in the Town 
House. There he held the first service, and on the 15th of the following 
month a church was organized. 



io ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Wantons were Quakers when the first missionary of the Church of 
England was sent here, and the statutes had been so framed as to 
give freedom to all in matters of conscience. The consequence 
was, that in 1700 one-half of the inhabitants were Quakers, who 
owned nearly one-third of the meeting-houses. 

But the church had a zealous advocate in Sir Francis Nicholson, 
who found a field white unto harvest when he came to America, on 
a mission quite apart from it. He was Lt.-Governor of New York, 
under Sir Edmund Andros, successively Governor of Virginia and 
Maryland, and, later, the active agent of the Crown in the effort to 
wrest Canada from the French. But with all his public duties, he 
had time and means to give to the church, and his influence was 
exerted in her behalf. He had occasion to come to Newport, and 
it is the received opinion that he secured the services of the Rev. 
Mr. Lockyer, who began to preach here about 1694, and soon drew 
around him a little flock. For four years the work had gone on 
under Mr. Lockyer, of whom it is to be regretted that we know so 
little, and the desire to have a church edifice and a settled minister 
had steadily increased. 

May 26, 1699, Richard, Earl of Bellomont, arrived at Boston, as 
Governor of Massachusetts. He soon took up his residence in New 
York. A few weeks after his arrival he came to Newport, and 
although he was received with the respect due to his rank, and every 
hospitality was extended to him (for which he returned thanks in a 
letter to Governor Cranston), he, evidently, had but very little respect 
for a people who entertained so many conflicting views on the sub- 
ject of religion. But those who were hungering for spiritual food, 
knowing he was a good churchman, did not hesitate to address to 
him the following petition, September 26, 1699 : 

"To his Excellency, Richard, Earl of Bellomont, Captain-General 
and Governor-in-Chief in and over the province of the Massachu- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. n 

setts Bay, New York, New Hampshire and the territories thereon 
depending in America, and Vice-Admiral of the same : 

The humble Petition of the people of the Church of England 
now residing in Rhode Island : 
Sheweth, 

That your Petitioners and other inhabitants within the Island, 
having agreed and concluded to erect a church for the worship of 
God according to the discipline of the Church of England, and 
tho' we are disposed and ready to give all the encouragement we 
possibly can to a pious and learned Minister, to settle and abide 
amongst us, yet by reason we are not in a capacity to contribute to 
such an Hon bIe maintenance as may be requisite and expedient : 

Your Petitioners, therefore, humbly pray your Lordship will be 
pleased so far to favor our undertakings as to intercede with his 
Majesty for his gracious letters to this Government, on our behalf, 
to protect and encourage us, and that assistance towards the present 
maintenance of a Minister among us may be granted, as your Ex- 
cellency in your great wisdom shall think most meet, and that your 
Excellency will also be pleased to write in our behalf and favor, to 
the Lords of the Council of Trade and Plantations, or to such 
Ministers of State as your Excellency shall judge convenient in and 
about the premises. 

And your Petitioners, as in duty bound, will ever pray, &c. 
Gabriel Bernon, 2 Wm. Brinley, 
Piere Ayroult, 3 Isaac Martindale, 4 

Thomas Fox, Robert Gardner, 5 

George Cutter, Thomas Paine, 

Wm. Pease, Thos. Mallett, 5 * 

Edwin Carter, Robt. Wrightingham, 

Fra. Pope, Anth'y Blount. 

Richard Newland, Thos. Littlebridge. 

was born at Rochelle, France, April 6, 
1644, which place he left just before the 
revocation of the edict of Nantes, and fled 
to England, where he resided some time — was there as late as 1687 — and 
came to America the following year. After a residence of about ten 




i2 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

The petition was forwarded to the Board of Trade by Lord 
Bellomont, October 24, 1699, and was read on the 5th of the follow- 
ing January. In his letter to the Board, endorsing the petition, 

years in Boston, where he landed, he removed to Newport, and was here 
active in founding the church ; his name appearing first in the above list 
of petitioners. He was twice married. His first wife, Esther LeRoy, 
died in Newport, June 14, 17 10, aged 56 years. From Newport Mr. 
Bernon removed to Providence, where he was equally active in founding 
a church. His next remove was to South Kingston, where he resided for 
a time. He died in Providence, February 1, 1736, where he was then 
making his home, in his ninety-third year, and was buried under St. 
John's Church. He was a good man — one whose whole life was given to 
the extension of Christ's Church on earth. Arnold, in his history, says : 
"He was buried with unusual marks of respect." Gabriel Bernon's 
second wife was Mary Harris, granddaughter of William Harris, the 
friend of Roger Williams. She died February 1, 1735-6, aged 92 years. 

3 Pierre Ayrault was also a Huguenot, a native of Angers, France. He 
was a physician, one of the settlers of French Town, East Greenwich, 
and was recognized as a man of influence. He died about June 4, 1711. 

4 Major Martindale had command of the Island Regiment in 1702. 
He was true to the Colony, as appears by his reply to Governor Dudley, 
who, claiming that Rhode Island was included in his Vice-Admiralty 
jurisdiction, demanded that the troops of the Colony should be placed 
under his command ; but was told by the Major that he should not call 
out his men without an order from the General Assembly or the Governor 
— an answer so foreign to the one that was expected that Dudley im- 
mediately left the Island. 

was Naval Officer and Collector of 
the Port of Newport. His grave- 
I 9 ^3 stone in the churchyard bears this 

ft-Ey ' inscription : 

" Here lieth interred the body of 
Mr. Robert Gardner, Esq., who was one of the first promoters of the 
Church in this place ; he survived all his brethren, and had the happiness 
to see this church completely finished. He was Naval Officer and Col- 
lector of this Port for many years, also employed in the affairs of this 
Colony, and discharged his trust to satisfaction. He died ye 1st of May, 
1731, the day of his birth, aged 69 years." 




NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 13 

Lord Bellomont says : " I send your Lordships the petition of 
several persons in Rhode Island for a Church of England Minister, 
and a yearly maintenance for him. I hope your Lordships will 
please to patronize so good a design, and will obtain his Majesty's 
allowance of a competent maintenance for such a minister. It will 
be the means I hope to reform the lives of the people in that Island, 
and make good Christians of 'em, who are at present all in dark- 
ness." 6 

That the application was favorably received and acted upon, is 
shown by the following reply to some other communication sent to 
the Society at about the same time : 

Rhode Island, 29th Sept., 1702. 
Honored Sirs : 

We cannot forbear expressing our great joy in being under the 
patronage of so Honorable a Corporation through whose pious 
endeavours with God's assistance, the Church of England hath so 
fair a prospect of flourishing in these more remote parts of the world, 
and amongst the rest of her small branches, ours also in Rhode 
Island. We therefore, Honored Sirs, beg leave to tell you that we 
look upon ourselves as under your pious care, and accordingly pre- 
sume to trouble you with small account of our affairs. Our Church 
is but young : it not being four years yet compleat since we began 
to assemble ourselves together on that occasion ; upon which account 

5a Near the centre of the graveyard there is a stone, the oldest in the 
grounds, bearing this inscription, under a skull and cross-bones : 

" Here lyeth interred the body of Thomas Mallett. He came from 
Great Marlow, in ye County of Buckingham, Old England, and departed 
this life in the year of our Lord 1704, on ye 16 day of January, and in ye 
56 yeare of his age. 

" He was a father to the fatherless." 

In his will, dated December 8, 1703-4, Mallett gave to the church forty 
shillings, and twenty shillings to the minister, to preach a funeral sermon. 

6 " Arnold's History of Rhode Island." 



14 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

the number of such men as can be relied upon to defray the charges 
of it, is but small at present; altho' there is a good many that con- 
stantly attend our worship regularly. The place wherein we meet 
to worship is finished on the outside, all but the steeple, which we 
will get up as soon as we are able;, the inside is pew'd well altho' 
not beautified ; we have also got an altar, where we have had the 
communion administered twice to our great joy and satisfaction, 
ch using rather to partake of that Holy Sacrament without those 
necessary conveniences that the tables in England are furnished with, 
(well knowing that they add not to the worthiness of the guests) 
rather than be without it, not but we are sensible they add much to 
the decency and order of it. The place wherein we live is one of 
the Chief Nurseries of Quakerism in all America, but now we have 
some reason to hope that the Reverend Mr. Keith, 7 by God's assist- 

7 Reverend George Keith, who travelled through parts of the country 
between 1702 and 1705, had been himself a Quaker, but was now in Holy 
Orders. He had arrived in Boston in June, 1702. Of a visit to Newport 
he makes record August 2d of that year : 

" I preached again at the Queen's Chapel, and next day set out from 
Boston, accompanied with the Reverend Samuel Myles, one of the Minis- 
ters of the Church of England congregation there, and we arrived in New- 
port, in Rhode Island, the next day, where we were kindly received. Mr. 
Lockyer, the Church of England Minister there, and divers others of the 
Church, came from Newport and met us at the ferry, and conducted us to 
the Town and place of lodging. Mr. Talbot stayed at Boston, to officiate 
in the Church there for Mr. Myles, until his return. 

" August 6, I went to the Quaker Meeting at Newport, on Rhode Island, 
accompanied with Mr. Myles, Mr. Lockyer, and many other persons belong- 
ing to the church there. 

" After one of their Preachers had spoken a long time and came to an 
end, having perverted many Texts of Scripture .... I began to speak, 
standing up in a Gallery, opposite a Gallery where their Teachers were 

placed, who were many But I was instantly interrupted by them 

very rudely, and they were very abusive to me with their ill Language, 
calling me Apostate, &c, and they threatened me with being guilty of the 
breach of the Act of Toleration, by which they said their Meeting was 
authorized. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 15 

ing his skill on that disease hath pretty well curbed (if not quite 
stopped) so dangerous a gangrene. Their behaviour to us outwards- 
is almost as civil as is consistent with their religion. Although 
slily and underhand, we are sensible they would pinch us in the 
bud. But thanks be to God who hath putt it past their power ; in 
that he hath not only raised up a queene that is truly a nursery 
mother, but hath blessed us also with the protection of so honorable 
a Corporation ; two such encouragements as (by the assistance of 
God's grace) are able not only to invigorate our endeavours towards 
the promotion of God's true Religion and Worship, but flushed us 
likewise with the hope of our Success. Thus, Honor'd Sirs, we have 

" Mr. Myles said I ought to be heard, I being a Missionary unto these 
American parts, by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts, and sent on purpose to endeavor to reduce the Quakers from their 
Errors ; the whole Society hath a Patent from the Crown of England, and 
not to hear me, nor suffer me to speak, was a Contempt of Supreme 
Authority. 

" Mr. Keith then appealed to Governor Cranston, who was present, 
but who avoided the difficulty. 

" The Governor at this went away, and Civily said to me he thought I 
had done better to have stayed till they were done. I told him then 
they would be gone, as they had served me at Lynn, at Hampton and at 
Dover." [Then] "one of the Speakers who was the Deputy-Governor 
.... took out of his Pocket a Printed abusive Paper, full of lies, having 
no name to it, and began to read it in the Meeting on purpose to drown 
my Voice, that I might not be heard. The title of it was One Wonder 
more; or, George Keith, the Eighth Wonder of the World. . . . Mr. 
Myles said it was an Infamous Libel, without a name to it, and it was a 
shame for such a man as he, being Lieutenant Governor, on purpose vilely 
to defame him. After he had done another Quaker Preacher, who had 
been formerly their Governor, began to preach. . . . 

" At last the first speaker made a long Rambling Prayer, full of Tau- 
tologies and vain Repetitions and presumptuous Boastings, as their manner 
is." .... [Then] "all the Preachers went away and many of the 
Quaker Hearers, but many of them also stayed. ... I had now full 
liberty without any interruption to speak, perceiving the Auditory gener- 
ally desirous to hear me." — Annals of King 1 s Chapel, 



1 6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

laid before you the circumstances of our Church, delivering them 
into your hands to do for us what you think best, only begging 
Leave to assure your Honors that whatsoever favors you are pleased 
to bestow upon us towards the Promotion of our Church, shall be 
accepted with the humblest Gratitude and seconded with the utmost 
of our abilities, and so we remain Honor'd Sirs. 

Your most Obedient Servants to command, 

John Lockyer. 

Wm Brinley \ Wardens> 

Rob't Gardner 



The outgrowth of this letter was the sending of the Reverend 
James Honyman to Rhode Island, as a missionary, in 1704, by the 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. 

In " An Historical Account of the Incorporated Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts," mention is thus made 
of the sending of Mr. Honyman to Rhode Island : 

" The Church Wardens of Rhode Island wrote to the Bishop of 
London, and to the Society, in the year 1702, declaring their early 
zeal, that tho' they had not assembled themselves to worship God 
after the manner of the Church of England above four years, they 
had built a handsome church. The Society resolved to send a mis- 
sionary hither, both on account of their being the first, and also a 
numerous people, settled on a flourishing island. The Reverend 
Mr. Honyman was appointed in 1704. He discharged the duties 
of his mission with great dilligence, 'tho' the Island was full of 
persons of many persuasions, especially Quakers, the Governor 
himself being such ; yet by his prudent behavior he gave offence to 
none and gained many to the Church. He continued there till the 
year 1708, and then came to England upon his own private affairs, 
but returned soon to his cure again. There were three little towns 
on the continent, Freetown, Tiverton, and Little Compton, which had 
requested a Missionary of the Society. Mr. Honyman was directed 
to visit them by turns on week days till they could be supplied with 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 17 

a minister. Mr. Honyman frequently crossed over to them, and 
preached to them in a meeting house which he obtained the use of 
and which was commodiously situated in the centre of the three 
towns. He said that the people at first, tho' very ignorant and rude 
in religious matters, were yet very grave and attentive at Divine 
Worship. He performed this laborious duty for several years." 

The next entry in order on the records is "A List of Persons 
Baptised by Mr. Honyman before he went to England last." [1708.] 

Grown Persons. — Robert Lawton, Benj. Shearman, Gorsham 
Wooddell, John Brown, 8 Robt. Hicks, Sam'l Albro, Sam'l Davis, 
James Little, Wm. Barker, Jeremiah Wilcocks, Isabel Albro, Pene- 
lope Cuttler, Eliz th Brown, Mary Shearman, Eliz th Lawton, Ruth 
Wooddel, Penelope Stanton, Mary Carr, 9 Sarah Pope, Bethia Beer, 
Bethsheba Banks, Susannah Wooddel, Katharine Thurbor, Sarah 
Bull, Hannah Bowdish, Mary Goulden, Deborah Hicks, Mary Hicks 
and Elizabeth Head." 

To the above there is added a list of thirty-five children baptized 
within the time named. 

Mr. Honyman had apparently no difficulty in preserving harmony 
in the church while in the immediate charge of the parish; but 
during his absence in England there was evidently some discord 
that was only removed on his return, as appears by the following 
entry : 

" A Vestry Held at Trinity Church In Newport on Rhode Island, 
June y* 20 th 17C9, The following Resolutions were Agreed to. 

8 John Brown was Captain John Brown, who settled in Newport in 
1661, and died here October 20, 1731. He married Elizabeth Cranston, 
daughter of Governor Samuel Cranston. She was born in 1661 and died 
June 3, 1756. After the death of Captain Brown she became the second 
wife of Rev. James Honyman. 

9 Mary Carr married Wm. Gardner, and was the mother of Caleb 
Gardner. 



1 8 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

"That to Prevent Any Contrivance that may tend to y e Defeating 
or Disapointing Any of y e Councils or Designs of this Vestry that 
Nothing Concluded in it Be Discovered by Private Whispers or 
open Cabals but that all business Relating to the Church be trans- 
acted with a becoming Secrasie. That as far as Possible both y e 
Names and Nature of Factions and Parties Be Banished and for- 
gotten. 

" That no Member of this Vestry as such shall for y e Future 
Espouse Any Private Quarrell. 

" That all Persons belonging to this Vestry being Summoned by 
y 8 Minister to Convene and Absenting themselves shall be Punished 
in A fine for y e use of the Poore to be Inflicted at y e Discretion of 
y e Vestry unless Reasonable Cause of such Absenting be Assigned 
of which y e said Vestry is to be y e Judg. 

" That all Letters sent by y e Vestry or Received by them upon 
y e Account of y e Church be Preserved in A Common Register. 

"That y e Queen's Most Excellent Maj y be Addressed in favor of 
y e Expedition to Canada. That y e Lord Bishop of London be most 
Humbly thanked for His Great Care of our Bell, that a Proper 
Person be Employed About seting up y e Bell. 

" That y e Money Left by Coll ct Nicholson in y e Gover™ Hands 
be forthwith Received by y e Church Wardens for y e use of y e 
Church at y e Appointment of y e Vestry. 

" That y e Money in y e Hands of y e Rev a Mr Miles of Boston 
Given by Coll ct Nicholson for y e use of this Church be forthwith 
demanded by y e Church Wardens And Receipts ordered by them 
upon Payment which money is Also to be Immediately Laid out 
for y e use of y e Church at y e Appointment of y e Vestry. 

" That there be immediate Care taken of y e Glass for y e Church 
Windows now in y e hands of y e Glasier be put in Without Delay. 

" That ye Books 10 belonging to y e Library of y e Church which 
have been Lent out be all called in & Public notice of this be given 
to those who have them By Placards Affixed to the Church 

10 Many of the books that made a part of the library at that day are in 
a fair state of preservation, and all that are left of the collection are 
stamped on the cover in gold letters, " Belonging to y" Library in Rhode 
Island." 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 19 

Dores & when they are come in a Survey be made of y e said 

Library. 

" That untill a Vestry Room is fitted up Wherein to keep y e Vestry 

Books & utencils of y e Church they be Committed to y e care of 

y* Church Wardens." 

James Honymax 
Nicho s Lange 1 Church 

Thos. Lillibridge j Wardens. 
William Gibbs. 

Whatever this disaffection may have been, some account of it must 
have gone to England, for on the same day the Minister and 
Wardens addressed the following letter to the Bishop of London: 

Newp* on Rhoad Island 

June y e 20th, 1709. 
May it Please your Lordship. 

We Being Extremely Sencible of y e unhappie Consequence of 
those Devisions which have like to have Prove so fatall to our Infant 
Church Have Agreed that Nothing Relating to this Church shall 
be transacted nor Representations made but by y e Joynt Consent of 
ye Minister Churchwardens and Vestry of this Church And of this 
Agreement we most Humbly beg your Lordship to take Notice to 
Prevent all future Differences & Private Applications. 

" We have by Your Lordship's Good Care our Bell safely Brought 
to our Hands for which we Return our most sensible Acknowledge- 
ment, And which will Not Only be A Most Beautiful Ornament to 
our Church But A Lasting Monument of Your Lordship's Pious 
& Parental Care of your Hopefull Nurseries Abroad. We most 
Humbly Beg y 8 Continuance of your Lordship's Countenance & 
Pious Encouragement unto 

May it Please Your Lordship 
Your Lordships Most Obedient 
And obliged Servants 

James Honyman 
Nicho s Laxge "I Church 
Thos. Lillibridge / Wardens. 
To y 9 Righ Rever d Father 
In God y e Bis p of London. 



20 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

At the same time a letter was addressed to Queen Anne. 

To y e Queen's Most Excellent Majestic The Humble Address Of 
the Minister & People Belonging to y e Church in Rhoad Island 
In America. 

Most Sacred Sovereign 

Amidst the Acclamations of Dutifull Subjects Attending your 
Maj es Glorious Reign Adorn'd with y e Bright Carracters reducing 
Tyrants to Reason & uniting Mankind in Interest & Affection we 
Beg Leave to Appear before your Maj 9 With our Most Loyal 
Regards And Most Humble thanks for y° Design your Maj y has 
been Pleased to Encourage of Adding y e Conquest of Cannada to 
ye Glory of the British Empire In America this is a Design so Wise 
in y e Contrivance, Carrying so benefitial A Prospect in its Conse- 
quences And Above all so Admirably founded upon y e Noblest & 
Most Perfect Principall Your Maj es Most Ardent Zeale of making 
your Religion Eaqually with your trophies that we think ourselves 
In Duty Bound upon y e Illustrous Occation to testify both our 
gratitude and Just Esteem of your Sacred Person & Administra- 
tion May Conquests & Laurels Incircle Your Head & triumphs 
Attend your Glorious Arms till y e King of Kings translate your 
Victorious Soul & seat it upon An Immoveable throne as y e Re- 
ward of Your Vertuous Person While Incence is offered Your 
Memory upon Earth to Perfume & Preserve It fragrant During y e 
succession of time 

Your Majesties Most Dutifull & 
obedient Subjects. 

James Honyman, Minister. 

Nicho s Lange \ Church 

Tho s Lillibridge J Wardens 

Will m Bright 



WlLL M GlBBS 



} 

\ Vestry. 



Newport Rhoad Island 
June y* 20th 1709 






• £W .• /' - 









I 
















#«Ae yV£<? ^7 I 



A PAGE FROM OLD REOiKl). 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 



Newp' Rhoad Island June y e 30th 1709 
Hon b S r 

We beg Leave to Embrace this Occasion Most Humbly to thank 
your Hon b for all your Kind Donations to our Church & more 
Espetially for y e last because it is Most seasonable to Assist us in 
setting up our Bell Given by Her Maj y & safely brought to our 
Hands We most Hartily Say ye Continuance of your favour & 
Encouragement to us Hopeing & Praying that Providence may 
Again Establish you in a capasity Eaquall to your Inclinations to 
Advance y e Interest & Hon r of these Infant American Churches 
which Already owe so much to your bounty & Charity. We pre- 
sume to transmit you y e Inclosed Address to y e Queen of Which we 
Intreat your Hon". Care as well as Conveyance of this Letter to 
y e Lord Bishop of London which we have sent open to your Peru- 
sal to Inform your Honour of y 6 Resolution we have taken to Pre- 
vent all future Differences we are now to ask Pardon for this trouble 
& leave to subscribe, 

May it Please your Hon r 
Your Hon" Most Obedient & 
Obliedged Servants 

James Honyman 

Nicho 8 Lange 1 Church 

Thos. Lilliebridge J Wardens. 
To y 9 Hon bla Coll d Francis 11 
Nicholson Att New York. 




Sir Francis 
Nicholson 
is credited 
with being 

" the original founder and first principal patron of Trinity Church." He 
certainly was active and prominent in establishing the Church, and there 
is ample evidence that he was liberal in his gifts. In this respect, so far 
as is known, he quite surpassed all of its other benefactors, and the Min- 
ister and Church Wardens showed their grateful appreciation, not only of 
his gifts, but also of his ready aid, when they wished to reach the ear of 
the Queen, or of the Bishop of London. 

The bell referred to hung in the tower from 1709 to 1740, when it 
cracked and was sent to London to be recast. 



22 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Newp' on Rhoad Island. 
June 30 th 1709. 
Revr d Sir. 

We having Present Occasion for that Money which was Left By 
Coll ct Nicholson In your Hands some years since for y e use of our 
Church, We Desire you will order y* Payment of It as soon as 
Possible & when we know what it is & how & when Paid we shall 
transmit you a Receipt under our Hands. 

We Expect your order this Post, & subscribe ourselves. 
Your Very Humble Servants 

James Honyman 
Nicho s Lange \ Church 

Thom s Lillibridge J Wardens. 
To y e Reverend Mr. Sam 11 
Myles, 12 Minister of Boston. 

The desire to conquer Canada was not checked by the previous 



(~^ J a/rujJo*' 




Rev. Samuel Myles succeeded Rev. Mr. Radcliffe as minister of King's 
Chapel, Boston, June 29, 1689. He graduated at Harvard in 1684, 
officiated in King's Chapel for nearly thirty-nine years, and died in 
March, 1727-8. His father was Elder John Myles, who came from 
Wales and was a Baptist preacher. An Assistant, who was sent out to 
Mr. Myles from England, named Dansy, died on the passage, and Mr. 
Myles comforted the widow by marrying her. 

" He was the oldest Episcopal minister of the town [at the time of his 
death]. The Rev. Mr. Honneyman, of Rhode Island ; Mr. Plant, of 
Newbury; Mr. Piggot, of Marblehead ; Mr. McSparran, of Narragansett ; 
Mr. Miller, of Braintree ; and Mr. Watts were bearers. The Rev. Mr. 
Cutter led the widow, the Rev. Mr. Harris walked before the corpse and 
buried it. The corpse was also followed by his Honor the Lieut. -Gov- 
ernor, and Council, the Justices and the Dissenting ministers of the town, 
with a vast number of gentlemen and merchants." — The New England 
Weekly Journal. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 23 

wants of success, and with enthusiasm a new expedition was fitted 
out under Sir Francis Nicholson. It sailed for Port Royal September 
18, 1710, and was crowned with success. Letters of congratulation 
were addressed to the Queen, and the commander of the expedition ; 
and the Minister, and Church Wardens and Vestry were not behind- 
hand in this grateful office. They at once sent the following letter 
to her Majesty : 

To the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty 

The Humble Address of the Minister & Vestry of the Church 
of England In Newport on Rhode Island In America 

May it Please Your Majesty 

To Suffer us Your Majesties Most Loyall Subjects to Press the 
throng of those who Dutifully Approach Your throne, With Ex- 
ultations of Joy upon that uninterrupted series of Glorious success 
Wherewith Heaven Has Crowned Your triumphant Arms Against 
y e Common Enemy & Oppressor By Congratulating your Majesty 
upon y e Reduction of Annapoles Royall to your Majesties Obedi- 
ence Which as it is A very Great Enlargement of your Majesties 
territories Abroad so it is so Valuable in itself that not so much the 
Present Generation as unborn Posterity will Reap y e Happie Ad- 
vantages of it, this new Conquest However Great In itselfe or Con- 
siderable with Regard to future Prospect Is Under y 6 Blessing of 
Heaven in A Particular Manner Owing to y e Conduct & Resolu- 
tion of y e Hon ble Coll ct Francis Nicholson Whom Your Majestie 
Wisely Chose to Command your troops on that Expedition For as 
his very Name was y e Hope & Encouragement of His Followers so 
His Presence & Wise Management struck such A horror in y e 
Enemy as Made them Bow & tremble before Your Maj 63 Victorious 
Arms & Make A tame Surrender of so Strong A fortress as Ren- 
dered all former Attempts Against it Fruitless & Unsuccessful! 
We Desire Humbly to Adore y e Goodness of God In Blessing your 
Majesties Forces With this success and Also to Acknowledg it y e 
Peculiar Favour of Divine Providence to that Worthy Gentleman 



24 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Who had y° Honour to Command who has not Only Been y e Pious 
founder of our Church but y* Most Generous & Munificent Patron 
that Ever Religion Had In America May y e God of Peace Crown 
all Your Majesties Designs With such success & Honour that the 
universall Peace of Europe may Acknowledg You its umpire & Its 
Guardian May y e Hosts of Heaven Encamp As Guards About 
Your Majesty May y e secresie of y e Divine Presence be your Pro- 
tection & Pavilion & May your Hands be Adorned with Eternall 
Palms of Victory these are y e Incessant fervant supplications of 
May it Please Your Majesty 
Your Majesties Most Loyall Most 
Dutifull & Most obedient Subjects. 

James Honyman, Min r 
Nicho s Lange 



, Churchwardens. 
John Brown 

Will m Barbut 

John Barker 

Newport on Rhoad 

Island in America 

Dec r 12 th 1 710 

There is nothing to show to whom the following letter was ad- 
dressed, but there is internal evidence that it was to Sir Francis 
Nicholson. The Altar Piece asked for was obtained, and had a 
place in the Church. When the new church edifice, the present 
structure, was raised in 1725, the altar piece was transferred to it, 
and it remained within the chancel till after the evacuation of the 
British, 1779, when some young men of the town, to whom the 
arms of Great Britain (woven in with the design and made a part of 
the carving) was an offence, tore it from its place, and took it to the 
north part of the town, where it was set up for a target and demol- 
ished. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 25 

Newpt on Rhoad Island 
Dec" i2 ,h 1710 
Hon ble Sr 

The Reflection on Your Former favors to us who Could Never 
Either Claim or Deserve them and y B unwearied Delight you Have 
of Doing Good forbid us to Doubt of Being forgiven for y e trouble 
we now Presume to Give You of Laying the Inclosed Address 
before Her Most Sacred Majesty With our Most Dutifull Regards 
for Her Person & Government. It is not any Flattering Panegy- 
rick on Your Virtues but A tribute Due from us unto your Merit & 
y e only Monument of Gratitude we can Erect unto It. 

to your other Kind Appearances for y e Interest & Honour of our 
Church we Also Most Humbly Intreat that this may be Added 
Namely that you Would Interceed with y e Hon ble Society for an 
Altar Piece for it [is] y° Only Ornament thats Wanting to finish & 
Compleat its Beauty we have Already sent y e Dimentions to Mr 
Chamberlain who It seems has Either Neglected or forgotten both 
it And us Which If you Will Procure & Assure us that you Con- 
tinue your Favour to us as it Will be such A Durable Instance of 
your Piety as no time shall ever be Able to Efface so will it impress 
y e Most Sensible & Most Lasting Signature of Esteem & Respect 
upon y e Minds of 

Hon Me S r 
Your Hon 8 Most Obedient Humble Servants 

James Honyman 
Nicho s Lange 
Jn Brown 
\V M Barbut 
Johx Barker 

July 26, 1713. John, Walter and Mary Cranston were baptized. 13 
November 29, 17 13. Richard Munday 14 was married to Martha 
Simons by Rev. Mr. Honyman. 

13 They were the children of Governor Samuel Cranston. 

14 But little is known of Richard Munday other than that he was a 
most excellent builder. He built the Colony House (now State House) in 

3 



26 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

[The Church in Rhode Island in common with other offshoots of 
the Church of England in America, desired to have a Bishop settled 
in the Colonies, and early addressed both the Crown and the So- 
ciety for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts on the 
subject. November 16, 17 13, they wrote to the Queen :] 

To the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, the Humble Petition & 
address of the Minister & Church Wardens & Vestry of the Church 
of England in Newport on Rhode Island in America. 

Most Sacred Sovereign. 

As Religion is your Majesties Greatest Ornament & Greatest 
love, so you have given the World the most convincing Demonstra- 
tions, that the advancement of it is your greatest care: which Happy 
thought encourages us in these remote parts of your Dominions, to 
the promoting the Great Interests of Which nothing can have a 
Greater tendency than the Establishing among us that primitive form 
of Church Government by Bishops, for were we so Happy as to 
have them they would be of the Greatest Service to Religion, not 
only by the necessary exercise of their sacred functions, in Confer- 
ring Holy Orders, Confirming our Children, Settling of Churches & 
blessing us all in their master's name & by His Authority, but by 
their presence influencing the Several Governments into the faithful 
discharge of that part of their office, the Restraining of vice, & 
encouraging virtue, awing the multitude into an observance of Re- 
ligious duties, & Giving a Check to those licentious practices that 
are so frequent abroad & which by reason of their distance are so 
seldom observed and Condemned at Home, and therefore since Re- 
ligion & virtue seems to languish in these Countreys, for want of 
Bishops, We hope your Majesty in your Royal Wisdom & Goodness 
will provide the proper Remedy, whereby it may revive & flourish. 
We also embrace this opportunity of expressing our satisfaction & 

1739, and a number of other buildings ; and, as his name frequently ap- 
pears in the records of the Church in connection with the care, repairs 
and alterations of the present Church, erected in 1725, we may reason- 
ably conjecture that he was its master builder. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 27 

returning your Majesty our most humble thanks for Giving it in 
Commission to the Hon ble Francis Nicholson Esq. — to enquire into 
the state of these American Churches. For, as many of them owe 
their very foundation to his pious Generosity, so we in a peculiar 
manner must with a very deep sense of Gratitude acknowledge Him 
our Chiefest Benefactor. We beg to assure your Majesty that we 
are with the most profound esteem 

May it please your Majesty 
Your Majesties most dutifull most loyall 
& most obedient subjects. 

James Honyman 
Nath : Kay 
Will: Barbut 
Nich : Lange 

THO : LlLLIBRIDGE 

Dan : Ayrault 
Will: Gibbs. 

Trinity Church in Newport, 
Nov r 16 th 1 713. 



[The same day the same committee addressed the following letter 
to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts:] 

Right Hon bIe & Right Reverend. 

" Since our Church receives no Countenance or encouragement 
from the Civil Government in this place, it's in vain to expect that it 
will arrive at its Wished for Happiness without the Superintendency 
of a Bishop in these parts, & therefore we join the other American 
Churches, in their earnest desire for so Great a Blessing to us. 

We return our most humble thanks for the care that is taken of 
this place by the Supporting Religion in it. 

" We shall pay the utmost deference to the power committed to 
the Hon ble Francis Nicholson, Esq, Our most Generous Benefactor 
& that not only in Obedience to your Commands, but out of a Re- 



28 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

gard to that Gentlemans merit, which the Churches in these parts 
are so much bound to value. 

" We are with all possible respect & esteem 

Right Hon ble & Right Reverend 
Your most obedient humble servants 
James Honyman 
Nath : Kay 15 
Will: Barbut 
Nich : Lange 

THO : LlLLIBRIDGE 

Dan : Ayrault 
Will: Gibbs 
Trinity Church in Newport, 
Nov r 1 6 th 1 71 3. 

Subscribed 
To the Right Hon* Ie & Right Reverend 
The Society for propagating the Gospel 
in foreign parts. 



15 At the accession of Queen Anne Nathaniel Kay was sent to Rhode 
Island as Collector of Customs, and took up his residence at Newport. 
Here he "built a house (on the lot next east of the Jewish Cemetery and ex- 
tending to Catharine Street) and here he passed the remainder of his days, 
dying in 1734, greatly beloved and deeply regretted. He was a benefactor 
of the church while he lived, and at his death he made the following 
bequest: 

I give and bequeath my dwelling house and coach house to my wife dur- 
ing her natural life : after which I bequeath both with my lots of land in 
Rhode Island, and £400 in currency of New England, to build a school 
house, to the Minister of the Churchof England (Mr. Honyman) and the 
Church Wardens and Vestry for the time being — that it is to say, upon 
trust and confidence, and to the intent and purpose, benefit and use of a 
school to teach ten poor boys their grammar and the mathematics gratis : 
and to appoint a master at all times, as occasion or vacancy may happen, 
who shall be Episcopally ordained, and assist the Minister, Episcopal, of 
the Town of Newport, in some proper office, as they shall think most useful. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 29 

[The first volume of the Records of the Church is missing. The 
record of baptisms and marriages from 1709 has been preserved. On 
the first pages of that book the preceding letters have been recorded. 
From this point there is a break, with the exception of here and 
there an item of interest, down to 1 731, when the records, though 
often scanty, appear to have been regularly made.] 

December 1, 17 16. Dr. Henry Hooper 16 was married to Mrs 
Remembrance Perkins. 

December 20, 17 16. Daniel Updike 17 was married to Sarah 
Arnold. 

June 3, 1717. Franklin Morton 18 was married to Bathsheba 
Hunt, by Rev. Mr. Honyman. 



Mr. Kay lies buried in the churchyard. On the side of the slab of slate 
that covers his remains are these lines : 

"Joining to the south of this tomb lies Lucia Berkeley daughter of Dean 
Berkeley, obit the 5th of September 1731." 

16 This was Dr. Hooper, senior. He was a surgeon on board a privateer 
in the French War, and died February 17,1 757, aged 70 years. His son, of 
the same name and also a physician, died October 15, 1745, aged 29 years. 

^ -7%. was of Narragansett. He was 

' r ~*yf/S\ * * Attorney-General of the Col- 

' />^r '/^fan/sdrr ony from I722 t0 I732 ' and 

-tl^.- 6y^WC/ King - s Attorney for Kings 

& County (now Washington 

County) from 1 741 to 1743. Attorney-General from 1743 to 1757, and 
died on the 15 th of May in that year. Updike in his" History of the Narra- 
gansett Church," says he married the daughter of Richard Smith, the first 
white person who settled in Narragansett ; but does not give the date or 
say whether it was a first or second marriage. 

Col. Updike studied law and began to practice in Newport. He was the 
first signer of the constitution of the society out of which grew the Red- 
wood Library. 

18 Dr. Frankland Morton, as his name should be written, was a physician 
in successful practice when he died, July 25, 1720, at the age of 34 years. 




3 o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

At a Vestry held at Trinity Church, in Newport, on the 18th day 
of September, 17 19, present : 

The Rever d Mr. James Honyman, Minister. 
Mr. Daniel Ayrault, 19 



> Vestrymen. 



, Church Wardens. 
Mr. William Gibbs. 

Mr. Adam Powell, 20 "| 

Mr. Nathaniel Newdigate, 21 

Mr. John Brown, 

Robert Gardner, 

The underwritten instrument was presented and received. 

Whereas, there has been no record made of the disposition of the 
pews in the above-mentioned church, which has been the cause of 
some misunderstanding among the members thereof, and to the end 
that all heats and animosities might be prevented for the future, and 
that we might keep the unity of the Spirit in the Bond of Peace, it 
is thought fit by this present Vestry, that there be due regulation 
made of all the pews in the said Church that are already taken up 



^au^^^r^^^ 



son of Dr. Pierre Ayrault, 
was born about [676-7, and, 
with other members of the 
family, came to Rhode Island from Rochelle, France. He was one of the 
settlers of French Town, East Greenwich, and from there removed to 
Newport. He married Marie Robineau, and the following is a copy of 
their marriage contract : 

" Saturday, the seventeenth day of April, 1703, We the subscribers, 
Daniel Ayrault and Mary Robineau, do certify in the presence of the un- 
dersigned witnesses, that we are promised and do mutually engage each 
other the faith of holy matrimony. And to that end we engage all that 
we have or hope to have in this world, for the performance of our promise ; 
desiring that God Almighty will give his blessing on our design, which is 
for His glory and the edification of our neighbors. Wherefore we are de- 
termined to consummate our marriage as soon as possible, according to 
the order of our Holy Discipline, and to be published the first time to- 
morrow in our church, according to custom, that all the congregation may 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 31 

and disposed of; and also a standing rule for the disposition of those 
pews that are not yet disposed of, and in order thereunto it is voted 
and ordered as follows : 

That there be a due record kept in the Church book of all the 

be witnesses of the promise which we have made in the presence of Elias 
Neau, Mary Pare, Judith Robineau, the mother and daughter, Susannah 
Neau and Ezekiel Graziellier, the day and year above written. 

Daniel Avrault, [seal] 
Marie Robineau. [seal] 
" Signed and sealed in our presence, 
Elias Neau, 
Susanna Neau, 
Judith Robineau, 
Judith Robineau, 
Ezekiel Graziellier." 

The officiating clergyman was the Rev. Mr. Peret, probably a careless 
spelling of the name of the pastor of the French Church in New York, 
Peiret, who died in 1706. 

Elias Neau was a vestryman in Trinity Church, New York, from 1705 
to 1714. In 1 704 he was appointed Catechist by the Society for the Propa- 
gation of the Gospel, with special reference to the education of Indians 
and Negroes in New York. He and his wife, Susannah, lie buried in 
Trinity Churchyard in that city. 

Daniel Ayrault died June 25, 1764, and Marie, his wife, born June 28, 
1684, died January 5, 1729. 

20 Adam Powell, a vestryman, was a merchant in Newport. He married, 
May 30, 1 713, Hester Bernon, daughter of Gabriel Bernon In 1733 
their daughter Elizabeth became the second wife of Rev. Samuel Seabury, 
who had been a Congregational minister, but who, through intercourse 
with Rev. Dr. McSparran, had become an Episcopal clergyman, and 
was appointed missionary to the church at New London, then in its 
infancy. 

21 The name of Nathaniel Newdigate first appears on the records in 
1709. In 1728 he was one of the commissioners to revise the laws of the 
Colony. On his tombstone, in the>old burying ground, there is this in- 
scription : 

"Here lieth Interred the Body of Nathaniel Newdigate Esq, late of 
Warwick in this Colony, who was born in Great Britain and died at War- 



32 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

pews that are disposed of, to whom they are disposed to, for what 
sum they have been sold for, upon what condition they are disposed 
on, and that each pew be numbered and placed upon record, together 
with the person or person's name owning each pew, and the same 
method to be used for all pews that shall be disposed of in the said 
Church, from time to time ; and that there shall be a man appointed 
to keep the book of records, such as the Vestry shall think fit, and 
that he shall have the fee hereafter named, for his fidelity in the 
premises. 

And to the end that all persons might be ascertained, on what 
account they hold their pews, it is ordered by the above said Vestry, 
that each pew that shall be purchased from the Minister, Church 
Wardens and Vestrymen, shall be his own right of inheritance, to 
him and his heirs forever, provided that him and his heirs are mem- 
bers of the Church and Constant Attendants on the services thereof: 
but if himself, or his heirs, should leave the Church, by any altera- 
tion of his or their opinion, or any other pretence whatsoever, for 
the space and time of seven years, then the said pew (at the expira- 
tion of the said seven years) shall return to the Church, and shall be 
disposed of as above said, for the benefit of the Church, and his, her, 
or their former right and property to the said pew, shall be wholly 
lost from him, her or them that were the former possessors thereof. 
Or if any family that is possessed of a pew, as above said, shall be 
wholly extinct ; in such case the right and property of the said pew 
shall wholly return to the said Church, and be disposed of as above 
said. 

And if it should so happen that any person who is possessed of 
a pew in the said Church should die and leave an infant, whether son 
or daughter of his own, the executor or guardian of the said child, 
if he or they be a member of the Church, and has no pew of his 
own or their own, shall have the use of the said pew, for him 
or themselves to sit in till the child comes to the age of eighteen 

wick the day of January, Anno Domini, 1740, in the 83d year of his 

age. He was a Noted and Famous Attorney at Law in this Colony, and 
acquitted himself in said Profession like an able, skilled and learned 
Gentleman." 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 33 

years : provided that the child is brought up and educated accord- 
ing to the principles of the Church of England ; but if the executor 
or guardian of the child has an pew of his or their own, then, on the 
death of the parent or parents of the said child, the said pew shall 
be hired out by the Vestry, and the profits thereof be to the use and 
benefit of the said Church till the orphan arrive to the age above 
said. And if the said orphan should not be educated in the princi- 
ples of the Church of England, and that he or she should arrive to 
the above said age," and then doth not declare him or herself to be 
a member of the Church of England, and attend constantly on the 
services thereof, or if the said orphan or orphans before he, she 
or they arrive to the aforesaid of eighteen years, then, and in all 
such cases, the right and property of the said pew shall return to 
the said Church, and be disposed of as the Vestry shall see fit, for 
the benefit of the Church. 

And also that no person, nor persons that has purchased any pew 
in the said Church, shall have the liberty to let or hire any part 
thereof to any other person or persons whatsoever, for their own 
benefit but for the benefit of the Church, and the money for which 
it shall be let shall be paid to the Church Wardens, for the use 
aforesaid, and that no person or persons having a pew, shall sell or 
exchange his or their property in the said pew, but by the liberty 
and consent of the Vestry. 

October 18, 17 19. George Wanton, 22 son of Willian and Ruth 
Wanton, was baptized by Mr. Honyman. 

October 25, 17 19. Elizabeth and Abigail Wanton, daughters of 
George and Abigail Wanton, were baptized. 

The following was the disposition of the pews in the Church in 
1719. 23 



22 George Wanton, son of Governor William Wanton, born August 24, 
1694. Married Abigail Ellery, daughter of Benjamin Ellery, December 

23 No plan or dimensions of the church have been preserved, but from 
the above it is evident that it was of very limited capacity. Allowing 
five persons to a pew, it afforded sittings for less than two hundred on 



34 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



Nc 


». 


No. 




I. 


Set apart for use of the Gov- 


i7- 


Madam Gidley. 




ernor. 24 


18. 


Madam Elizabeth Carr. 


2. 


Mr. Neargrass. 


19. 


John Martindale. 


3- 


Mr. Gibbs. 


20. 


Mr. Mackintosh. 


4- 


Dr. Morton. 


21. 


Mrs. Margaret Wrighington. 


5- 


Benj. Shearman. 


22. 


Mr. Bull. 


6. 


Geo. Goulding. 


23- 


Mr. Matthews. 


o. 


The Minister's pew. 


24. 


Daniel Ayrault. 


7- 


Mr. May. 


25. 


Samuel Haydon. 


8. 


Thos. Lillibridge. 


26. 




9- 


Gabriel Bernon. 


28. 




IO. 


Richard Munday. 


29. 


Thomas Jones. 


n. 


Samuel Pike. 


30. 


Robert Gardner. 


12. 


Col. William Wanton. 


31- 


Jahleel Brenton. 


13. 


Mr. Neargrass. 


32. 


Mr. Bright. 


14. 


Capt. John Brown. 


33- 


Augustus Lucas. 29 


15- 


John Cranston. 


34- 


Mr. Brinley. 27 


16. 


Nathaniel Kay. 


35- 


Capt. Joseph Arnold. 



the lower floor, and that in a town with a population of 4640.* The 
gallery was probably confined to the west end of the building. The 
Governor's pew at that time was occupied by Governor Samuel Cranston. 
In the "Annals of King's Chapel," I., 377, there is this extract from the 
records of the church. 

" Boston, April 29th, 1728, voted: That the Governor's pew be new 
lined with China, that the Cushions and Chairs be covered with crimson 
damask, and the curtains to the windows be of the same damask. 

" The Governor's pew remained a unique property of King's Chapel." 
The records of Trinity Church show this to be incorrect. 

Gov. Samuel Cran- 
ston was elected 
governor in March, 
1 698, and remained 
in office up to the 
He was the son of Governor John 




time of his death, April 



Census of 1730. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 35 

Gallery. 



Mr. Lange. 
Mr. Paul. 
Captain Flower. 
Captain Freebody. 



John Dickerson. 
Mr. Place. 
John Davis. 
Adam Powell. 



Cranston, elected 1678, and who also remained in office up to the time 
of his death, 1680. 

"The death of Governor Cranston was no ordinary event in the his- 
tory of the Colony. In the strength of his intellect, the courage and 
firmness of his administration, and the skill with which he conducted 
public affairs in every crisis, he resembled the early race of Rhode 
Islanders. Thirty times successively chosen to the highest office, he pre- 
served his popularity amidst political convulsions that had swept away 
every other official in the Colony. He was the connecting link between 
two centuries of its history, and seemed, as it were, the bridge over which 
it passed in safety, from the long struggle with the royal governors of 
Massachusetts, to the peaceful possession of its chartered rights under the 
House of Hanover. The piratical period, the strife about the acts of 
trade, the desperate efforts of Bellomont and his successors, a long and 
exhausting foreign war, and two bitter boundary disputes, involving the 
largest portion of the Colony, one of which he lived to see favorably and 
finally settled, were some of the perplexing questions of his administra- 
tion." — Arnold's History of Rhode Island. 

29 Augustus Lucas was a French emigrant, who settled in Newport. 
His first wife died here in 1698. His second wife was Barsheba, daughter 
of Joseph Eliot, and granddaughter of Eliot the Indian apostle. Their 
daughter Barsheba married Augustus Johnston, who was later Attorney- 
General of the Colony. After the death of Johnston she became the wife 
of Matthew Robinson, who was known as a man of erudition and a skil- 
ful lawyer. 

2T the first of the name who came 

c ^ 4 sjf i to America, was born in Eng- 

" y~US. C/j T~tyy\^ €^< •land i n ^90. His grand- 

/7 son, Francis Brinley, educated 

at Eaton College, came to Newport by the invitation of his grandfather, 
who made him his heir. He was admitted a freeman June 20, 1713. 
From Newport he removed to Boston, where, in 1723, he was a Warden 
in King's Chapel. 



36 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



CHAPTER II. 

1719-1731. 

In the proceedings of the Society for the Propagation of the Gos- 
pel in Foreign Parts there are these entries under date of 1720 to 
1721. 

" Mr. Honyman, missionary at Newport, Rhode Island, repotted 
that he preached twice every Sunday, catechises twice a week, and 
administers sacrament every month, and has baptized in about two 
years seventy-three persons, of whom nineteen are adults. 

" The Rev. Mr Honyman, minister of Rhode Island in New 
England reports, ' That he had been lately to preach at Providence, 
a town in the Colony, to the greatest number of people he ever had 
together since he came to America ; that no house being able to 
hold them, he was obliged to preach in the fields ; that they are get- 
ting subscriptions for building a Church, and he doubts not there will 
be a considerable congregation. " 25a 

May 14, 1 72 1. James Cranston was married to Mary Ayrault. 26 

25a At this time Mr. Honyman occasionally performed Divine service 
in the Narragansett Church, and administered the rite of baptism, and 
the Lord's Supper. Rev. Mr. Gay had been appointed missionary in 
this section, but did not remain long, and the Society in England, in 
compliance with the petition from the people in Narragansett for a mis- 
sionary, sent them Rev. James McSparran in 1721, who entered upon his 
duties with zeal, and soon acquired great influence for good. 

26 Mary Ayrault was the daughter of Daniel Ayrault, born at East 
Greenwich, February 16, 1704, and died in Newport, March 25, 1764. 
After the death of Cranston she married George Goulding, and survived 
him. 



N EM PORT, RHODE ISLAND. 37 

At a Vestry sitting in the Church, May 15, 1 721, Nathaniel New- 
digate and Adam Powell were elected Church Wardens ; and Na- 
thaniel Kay, Robert Gardner, Captain John Brown, Daniel Ayrault, 
and George Piggott, Vestrymen. 

It was ordered that a letter then and there subscribed by the Min- 
ister, Church Wardens and Vestry, be sent home to the Society's 
Secretary [Society for the Propagation of the Gospel] for encour- 
agement for a schoolmaster. 28 

At a Vestry sitting in the Church, March 22, 1722, Adam Pow- 
ell and William Coddington were elected Church Wardens, and 
Henry Bull, Thomas Flower, George Wanton, Godfrey Malbone, 
John Freebody and Edward Neargrass, Vestrymen. 

It was ordered that the Church Wardens have the pavement be- 
fore the Church completed ; they were also to see that leather 
cushions were provided for the altar. Further instructions em- 
braced the putting of " a post and rail fence at the end of the lane 30 

28 As early as 1710 the people of Newport gave attention to the edu- 
cation of their children by establishing a public school, and placing it 
under the Town Council ; and a Latin school was opened in 1716. Ports- 
mouth, "having considered how excellent an ornament learning is to 
mankind and the great necessity there is in building a public school- 
house," appointed a committee to put up such a building and obtain a 
subscription to furnish it. Mr. Kay, one of the Vestry (and probably 
other members were of the same mind), took a lively interest in the sub- 
ject of education, and when he died he made a liberal bequest to the 
Church to promote so good a cause. 

30 Church street, from Thames street to Spring street, is defined on the 
John Mumford map of Newport, 17 13 ; but for more than seventy years 
after that date it was known as Honyman's lane, and was so designated 
on deeds of conveyance. Rev. Mr. Honyman occupied the house on the 
south corner of Thames and Church streets, and his widow resided there 
after him. James Honyman, the son, owned real estate on the north 
side of Church street, which descended to his heirs. We may reasonably 
believe that Rev. Mr. Honyman bought a tract running through from 



38 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

leading up to the Church," and in the fence there was to be a turn- 
stile. 

Ordered that Mr. James Martin have the pew that was Mr. Near- 
grass's, he paying. 

May 22, 1722. The Rev. James McSparran 31 was married to Miss 
Hannah Gardiner, daughter of William Gardiner, of Boston Neck, 
in Narragansett, by the Rev. James Honyman, in St. Paul's Church. 

October 11, 1722. William Coddington 32 was married to Jean 
Bernon. 

January 3, 1723. William Ellery 33 was married to Ann Almy. 

Thames street to Spring street, bounded on the south by Frank street, 
and on the north by the Brenton estate; that a part was set off for the 
Church, and that the remainder was disposed of from time to time by him- 
self and heirs. The records of that period are lost. 

31 For an interesting account of Rev. James McSparran, and his labors 
as missionary in the Narragansett Country, see Updike's Narragansett 
Church. Mrs. McSparran died in England, June 24, 1755, of small- 
pox, and was buried in Broadway Chapel burying-ground, Westminster. 
Dr. McSparran, in making entry of her death, said of her: " She was the 
most pious woman, the best of wives in the world, and died, as she de- 
served to be, much lamented." 

32 ^**^s 

was the son of Thos. 
and Mary Codding- 
ton, and a grandson 
of Gov. Wm. Cod- 
dington. He was 
born January 1, 1690, and was accidentally killed with others, by a gunpow- 
der explosion, September 1 7, 1 744, in Newport. His first wife was Comfort 
Arnold, eldest daughter of Gov. Benedict Arnold ; his second wife was 
the above Jean Bernon, daughter of Gabriel Bernon. The following year 
he was elected Senior Warden of the Church. It was to Col. Cod 
dington that Rev. John Callender dedicated his Century Sermon, 1738. 
In August, 1737, Col. Coddington and his wife, on their removal from 
Newport, were admitted to St. Paul's-, Narragansett, by Rev. James 
McSparran. 
33 William Ellery was born at Bristol, October 31, 1701, and died at 




(V^^ ^^>C^ 



NEWPORT; RHODE ISLAND. 39 

The Church prospered ; the labors of Mr. Honyman to advance 
its interests and increase the number of its adherents had met with 
the most gratifying success, and the subject of a larger and more im- 
posing Church edifice naturally engaged their attention. A subscrip- 
tion paper was started, headed by Mr. Honyman with a subscription 
of ^30 (his stipend was but £jo), which must have excited the emula- 
tion of his followers, for they were not long in raising a sufficient 
sum to warrant them in breaking ground. How the work went on 
may be gathered from the following minutes of the proceedings of 
the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, on 
which alone we must depend for the facts, the Church record of that 
period having been lost. 

In 1 72 1 Mr. Honyman "reported that he preached twice every 
Sunday, catechises twice a week, administers sacrament every month, 
and has baptised in about two years past seventy-three persons, of 
whom nineteen are adults." 

The following year he reported : " That he had been lately to 
preach at Providence, a town in that Colony, to the greatest number 
of people he had ever had together since he had came to America ; 
that no house being able to hold them, he was obliged to preach in 
the fields ; that they are getting subscriptions for building a church, 
and he doubts not but there will be a considerable congregation." 

In 1723 Mr. Honyman reported, " that within two years past he 
hath baptised eighty-two, of which nineteen were adults, three of 
them negroes, two Indians, and two mulatos ; that there are properly 
belonging to that Church above fifty communicants, that live in that 
place, exclusive of strangers ; that the people growing too numerous 
for the church, and others offering to join them if they could be ac- 

Nevvport, March 15, 1764. He was the father of the patriot of the same 
name, who was his third son. His wife, Ann (Lawton) Almy, was born 
in Portsmouth, August 1, 1703, and died in Newport, July 13, 17S3. 



40 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

commodated with room, he proposed the building of a new church, 
and has obtained near ^"iooo subscriptions for that purpose, though it 
is supposed the building will cost twice that money ; that the mate- 
rials are getting ready, and the workmen will begin upon them in 
the spring." 

In 1725 he reported to the Society "that his congregation has 
very much increased ; that they are now building a large new 
church ; that in the year 1724 he baptised forty-three, among which 
were eight adults, six of them negroes and Indians, and one Indian 
child." 

In 1746, when some litigation was going on between the Church 
and a pew owner, Rev. Mr. Honyman furnished the following infor- 
mation, drawn from the records then extant. 34 

Monday, Dec. 6, 1725. 
" At a meeting of the Minister, Church Wardens and Vestry of 
Trinity Church, in the new Church this day, it was agreed that the 
said work should be carried on with all convenient despatch, and 
that a Plaisterer should be sent for from Boston for greater certainty 
of having it handsomely Plaistered, and that the best and most prac- 
tical method of raising Money to defray the necessary charges of 
the s d building was by laying out the Pews that may amt. in the 
whole to the sum of money wanted to complete the whole Church 
as near as possible : and, further, that the whole congregation should 
meet in s d Church on Wednesday morning next, where every one 
desirous of a Pew may be accommodated, he paying the price set 
upon s d Pew, at least one half in hand, or in two months from that 
date, and the other half at or before the compleat finish of the Pews 
and the whole Church : according to which resolution all those 
who do not pay their Money down for the Pews are desired by the 

34 This paper was lost by some accident, and was not recovered till 
1798, when it was found by Mr. Christopher Champlin, who gave it to 
the Vestry, which body had it attached to the records of the Church, refer- 
ence being had to it, with the above statement, on page 231 of the records. 



X FAY PORT, RHODE ISLAND. 41 

Committee to sign their names against the number of the Pews they 
choose, to prevent disorder and misunderstanding, as well as to as- 
certain the payment of the several sums mark'd on their Pews, as 
followeth : 

"Wednesday, December 8, 1725, the Majority of the males of 
the Church Congregation being present, was read in an audiable 
voice the Committee's last resolution, and also the s d Conditions 
upon which the pews in said Church were to be disposed of and 
bought, viz.: 

" I st . That the Pew purchased shall belong to the purchaser and 
his heirs forever, he and they adhering to the Doctrine and discipline 
of the Church of England. 

" 2 d . That in case the purchaser or his Successor, in his own or 
an)- other right, shall desert the Church, or join himself to any other 
Society, shall forfeit all title or claim to that Pew, which in such 
case shall revert to the Church, for a new disposition. 

" 3 d . That if a purchaser or his heirs shall leave the Town, they 
shall be allowed to dispose of their Pew to such as the Minister, 
Church Wardens or Vestry shall approve of, he or they having first 
given the offer to them at the first cost. 

" 4 th . That in case of the death of a purchaser, without heirs of his 
body, or name in his will, the Pew shall revert to the Church for a 
new disposition. 

" Last. That the aforesaid rules shall be recorded in the Church 
books and become binding Laws to all concerned. 

" This may certify that the aforewritten is a true Copy of the reg- 
ulation of the Pews in Trinity Church in Newport, in the Colony of 
Rhode Island, made on the 6 th and 8 th days of December, 1725, as 
the same now stands recorded in the Church Books, which was com- 
pared this 24 day of June, Anno. Dom., 1746, by me." 

July 21, 1725, the New England clergy met at Newport to confer 
together and take council of each other, when a letter to the Secre- 

4 



42 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

tary of the Society was prepared and forwarded to him, making 
known the difficulties under which they labored, and urging that a 
Bishop might be sent to them. 

" We humbly conceive," said they, " nothing can more effectually 
redress these grievances and protect us from the insults of our ad- 
versaries than an Orthodox and Loyal Bishop residing with us, and 
at this time are awakened to such a thought by the coming over 
of Dr. Welton, late of White Chapel, who has privately received 
the Episcopal character in England, and from whose influence and 
industry we have reason to fear very unhappy consequences on the 
peace of the Church and the affections of this Country to our most 
excellent constitution, and his most sacred Majesty's Person and 
Government. Not only those who profess themselves Churchmen 
long and pray for the great blessing of a worthy Bishop with us, but 
also multitudes of those who are well-wishers to us, but are kept 
concealed for want hereof, and immediately appear and form many 
congregations too. If once this happiness were granted, this would 
supply us with many useful Ministers from among ourselves, whom 
the hazards of the sea and seasickness, and the charges of travel 
discourage from the service of the Church and tempt them to enlist 
themselves as Members or Ministers of Dissenting Congregations. 
Our people might receive the great benefit of Confirmation, the use- 
fulness whereof we preach and they are deeply sensible." 

" Signed by Messrs. Cutler, Honyman, McSparran, Plant, Pigot 
and Jopson. Mr. Myles was absent, not being able to bear the 
fatigue of the journey, and Mr. Usher 35 not only failed to sign the 
letter, but abruptly left the convention." — Annals of King's Chapel, 
L 338. 

85 Rev. Mr. Usher was sent as missionary to Bristol, and he was to have 
a stipend of £60 per annum. At Bristol he was cordially received, and 
entered upon the duties of his mission with zeal and faithfulness. But he 
was not permitted to enjoy the emoluments of his office to the full ; for it 
appears from a vote passed in 1731, that he was required to support all the 
widows of the Church (St. Michael's) from what he received- as his own 
salary. Mr. Usher's ministry was very successful. 




TRINITY CHURCH. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 43 

In 1726 word was received by the Society, from Rev. Mr. Hony- 
man, " Acquainting that the new church there is nigh finished, and 
will be ready for the Society's present as soon as it can be sent (which 
present is a plain purple communion cloth, pulpit cloth, and 
cushion), and that the people had given the old Church, with all its 
furniture, to a neighboring place, where they conceive it will be of 
great use." 3511 

35a The building was given to a congregation gathered at Warwick, but 
having no Church of their own. Although it was taken down and car- 
ried there, it does not appear that the materials were ever put together 
again. There is a tradition that it was floated from Newport to Warwick, 
but for this there is no warrant. 

The following interesting letter from Rev. James McSparran is taken 
from Rev. Dr. Hallam's " Annals of St. James's Church," New London : 

Narraganset, March 21 1725-6 
Gentlemen. Pursuant to y* advice of Feb. 25 th , I went to Newport y e 
next monday & the Committee for building their new Church being 
acquainted with my business, met y 4 evening at Mr. Honeyman's house, 
to whom having Proposed when & upon what Terms they would Part 
with the old Church, they came to the unanimous Result, that Provided 
the Gentlemen of New London would take down, Transport, Erect & 
Finish the Church at New London, & Expect no assistance from them, 
they should have it & all its appurtenances Gratis : except the altar 
piece, which was expected to be given to Narraganset. Next day one or 
Two at most y* are not of the Committee objected against parting it with 
it upon Terms : w* Those Terms will be when their Congregation meets 
(if ever it meets) to Consult upon y* affair, I am as yet unable to advise 
you. In y e mean time Gentlemen, I would have you make no offer : for 
should the few y e are for parting with y e old Church upon Terms Prevail 
(w eh I can hardly think) yet must the price they Set be governed by y c 
advantage their old Church will be to themselves, if you have it not ; & 
not by the Benefit it will be of to you if ye have it. These things, there- 
fore, Let me Propose to be distinctly & maturely Considered by you the 
Committee. 

(i.) If you have their Church you must Send the Carpenters you Intend 
to Raise it to pull it down for the Timber must be marked all anew, & some 



44 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 

[At the Convention held in King's Chapel, Boston, this year, 
1726, Rev. Mr. Honyman preached the sermon, which sermon was 
printed in Boston in 1733.] 

new ones there will be wanting in the roof & other places ; & although 
the Carpenter I Consulted, viz. Monday, Said the Charge of pulling it 
down would be ^50, yet the Gentlemen themselves concluded it will be 
more, & I believe you may Venture to Lay the Charge of taking Safely 
down, Carting to y e water, putting aboard and Transportation at ^500. 

(2.) You will by this Church, whether Given or Sold, save no Boards, 
Nails, Plank Nails, Clift Boards & Nails, Shingles nor Lath Nails. Its like 
a few, & but a few, Plank & Boards will be Saved; it will save you no 
Shingles Clift Boards, Laths, lime nor Window Frames. 

(3.) If you have the New Port Church you will then be under an abso- 
lute necessity of conforming to ye dimensions of said Church, both as to 
the House & Belfry. Now, it may be, Gentlemen, you will think a less 
Fabrick will do y e Turn w ch if Built Square, may in time be Lengthened 
& Enlarged. 

(4.) By this Church you will Save Something in the Pews, Pulpit, & 
Communion Table. You will do well, therefore, to Consider of the 
Dimensions of y e Church (in case you Cannot obtain this) & See w* v e 
frame & materials of all Sorts will Cost, and w* the workmen will de- 
mand to finish y e same, without w ch you cannot know when you are well 
offered, Should the Gentlemen here send you up their Terms. As to a 
Subtreasurer, I have determined Mr. Shackmaple for y' Trouble, & you 
will w th all Convenient Speed, I hope, Pay in the Several Sums annexed 
to your Names, y l there may be a beginning ; you have given a good & 
Encouraging Example in y e Subscription, & the like is Equally needful 
in paying them In to the Treasurer ; by this others not of y e Committee 
will be animated, not only to Subscribe, but to make ready pay, for I 
must beg leave to tell you y l I think it absolutely necessary there be some 
money Lodged before the building is begun, Leest if Some Consequences 
y l may Reflect Dishonor upon y e undertaking in So Captious a Country 
as yours is. The motion made by the Committee hindered me from any 
Farther Progress then, you See, with y e Subscription Paper, but I may 
Venture to assure you y* should the old Church be denied you Gratis, 
Severall of ye Gentlemen will think themselves bound in honor to Con- 
tribute to y° Assistance, &, for w* I know, y* method may be Equally 
beneficial to You. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 45 

September 1, 1726-7. Thomas Wickham, adult, was baptized, and 
June 3, 1730, his son, bearing his name, was baptized. 

July 30, 1727. George Johnson 36 was married to Bathsheba Lucas. 

August 3, 1827. Richard Mumford 37 was married to Sarah 
Newdigate. 

October 10, 1728. John Gidley 38 was married to Mary Cran- 
ston, daughter of Colonel John Cranston. 

I have Enclosed the Deed, there being no Difficulty in Drawing a 
proper Conveyance from Mr. Mumford to the use of the Church, for the 
Deed from him must be to 3, 4, 5, or 6 of you by name, in trust, for said 
use; with a Clause therein inserted, obliging the Gentlemen therein 
named, y l so soon as a Minister of the Established Church comes & is 
Settled amongst you, & has Erected & Incorporated a Vestry, they make 
Conveyance of said land & Edifice thereon built to the Church Wardens 
by name, & their Successors for Ever in Said Office for said Use. I 
should have Waited on you My Self the Last Sunday of y 1 Instant, but 
having no Horse, & being shortly to go to Boston, hope you will Excuse 
my Absence. I have no more to add, but the tender of my Best Respects, 
w ch please to Accept from, Gentlemen, y r most Obedient Humble Servant. 

James McSparran. 

36 The name should be Johnston. Their son, Augustus, became the 
Attorney-General of the Colony. 

37 Richard Mumford was given the command of one of the companies 
raised in 1745 for the reduction of Louisburg, but dying in October of 
that year, the command passed to his First Lieutenant, Edward Cole, who 
became a distinguished officer. 

38 John Gidley was the son of John Gidley, Judge of the Vice-Admi- 
ralty Court, who came to Newport from Exon, in Devon, and died here in 
1 7 10. John Gidley, the son, was accidentally killed in September, 1744, 
His first wife was Sarah Shackmaple, daughter of John Shackmaple, of 
New London, where he was a man of prominence. She died May 12, 1727. 
His second wife was the above-named Mary Cranston. She died October 
3, 1733, aged 24 years. His third wife was Elizabeth Brown, daughter of 
Captain John Brown. In 1742-3 the Judge of Admiralty having gone to 
England, John Gidley was appointed in his place till the king's will could 
be known. 



46 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

[The year 1729 opened with an event of great interest to the 
Church — the arrival in America of Rev. George Berkeley, Dean 
of Deny, who, on his return to England, after a stay of nearly 
three years on this Island, was made Lord Bishop of Cloyne. 
The object of his visit to America, and the events connected with 
his life on this Island, are so well known that I need not here 
recall them. The circumstances attending his landing at New- 
port, January 23d, after a passage of five months, are thus given 
in " Bull's Memoir of Rhode Island ":] 

" The ship ran into the west passage, and came to anchor. The 
dean wrote a letter to Mr. Honyman (Rector of Trinity Church), 
which the pilots took on shore at Conanicut Island, and called upon 
a Mr. Gardner and Mr. Martin, two members of Mr. Honyman's 
Church, informing them that a great dignitary of the Church of 
England, called Dean, was on board the ship, together with other 
gentlemen passengers. They handed them the letter from the dean, 
which Gardner and Martin brought to Newport in a small boat, with 
all possible dispatch. On their arrival they found Mr. Honyman 
at Church, it being a holyday on which divine service was held there. 
They then sent the letter by a servant, who delivered it to Mr. 
Honyman in the pulpit. He opened it and read it to the congre- 
gation, from the contents of which it appeared the dean might be 
expected to land in Newport every moment. The Church was dis- 
missed with a blessing, and Mr. Honyman, with the wardens, vestry 
and congregation, male and female, repaired immediately to the 
Ferry Wharf, where they arrived a little before the dean, his family 
and friends." 

[Dean Berkeley found in Newport a congenial society, and a resi- 
dence here delightful. He bought about one hundred acres of land, 
built a house and called the place Whitehall, a name that it still 
retains. How well pleased he was with his surroundings, within 
three months of his landing, is shown in a letter to Thomas Prior.] 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 47 

Newport, on Rhode Island, April 24, 1729. 

I can by this time say something to you, from my own experi- 
ence, of this place and people. The inhabitants are of a mixed kind, 
consisting of many sects and sub-divisions of sects. Here are four 
sorts of Anabaptists, besides Presbyterians, Quakers, Independents, 
and many of no profession at all. Nothwithstanding so many dif- 
ferences, here are fewer quarrels about religion than elsewhere, the 
people living peaceably with their neighbors of whatsoever persua- 
sion. They all agree in one point, that the Church of England is 
the second best. The island is pleasantly laid out in hills and vales, 
and rising ground; hath plenty of excellent springs, and fine rivu- 
lets, and many delightful landscapes of rocks, and promontories, and 
adjacent lands. 

The town of Newport is the most thriving place in all America, 
for business. It is very pretty and pleasantly situated ; I was never 
more agreeably surprised, than at the first sight of the town and 
harbor. 

March 12, 1729. Major Fairchild 39 was married to Bathsheba 
Palmer. 

May 27, 1729. William Mumford 40 was married to Elizabeth 
Honyman by Dean Berkeley. 

39 The "Major" was Fairchild's Christian name, and not a title. In 
an old deed he is styled "cooper." He was engaged in trade, chiefly 
commercial, and his daughter Ann became the wife of Metcalf Bowler. 
With Bowler he was engaged in commercial enterprises. October 28, 
1764, he married Katharine Malbone, daughter of Godfrey Malbone, who 
became his second wife. 

40 William Mumford was put in command of Fort George in 1756, and 
he was also in command in 1759. Elizabeth Honyman, who became his 
wife, was the only daughter of Rev. James Honyman. Her married life 
was short, for she died on the 21st of July, 1 730, in her 24th year. Her 
remains lie buried in the churchyard, by the side of those of her father and 
mother. This is the only entry in the Church records of a marriage by 
Dean Berkeley during his residence on the Island, and it was a graceful 
tribute to him on the part of Mr. Honyman to ask him to marry his 
daughter. 



48 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

June 12, 1729. David Chesebrough was married to Abigail 
Rogers. 41 

September 21, 1729. Henry Barclay [Berkeley] son of Dean 
Barclay, was baptized by his father, and received into the Church. 

September 25, 1 729. Captain Robert Oliver 42 was married to Mary 
Dunbar. 

There are no entries for 1730, and, in fact, much of the material 
brought together in these pages up to this date was gathered from 
other sources than the Church records. The record of baptisms 
and marriages is fairly well preserved, but there is no record of 
deaths up to this period. From 173 1 the records go on regularly, 
but are far from minute in their details ; and when we come down 
to the revolution there are gaps that cannot now he filled. The ser- 
vices of the Church were kept up, and when the town was taken 
possession of by the British they were continued the same, for the 
minister, Rev. George Bisset, was a loyalist. Other places of wor- 
ship were desecrated and turned into stables, but that of the Church 
of England was kept from such defilement. 

An interesting event connected with the stay of Dean Berkeley 
on the Island was the formation, in 1730, of the Philosophical So- 
ciety, out of which, ultimately, grew the Redwood Library. The 
influence of Berkeley was felt long after his departure. His personal 
friends, who joined him in the formation of the society, were Daniel 

41 Mrs. Chesebrough died in Newport in 1737. Mr. Chesebrough's 
second wife was Margaret Sylvester, of whom there is a portrait extant 
painted by Blackburn, the second artist who came to America. Mr. Chese- 
brough removed to Stonington, and died there in March, 1782. His 
daughter Abigail, by his first wife, married Alexander Grant, oldest son of 
Sir Alexander Grant, of Scotland. In the Newport Mercury of September 
11, 1775, it was announced that "The Hon. Mrs. Abigail Grant, lady of 
Sir Alexander Grant, arrived at Newport from London via New York." 

42 Captain Robert Oliver was an active and widely-known commander, 
in his day, in the mercantile marine. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 49 

Updike, the Attorney-General of the Colony, James Searing, Judge 
Edward Scott, Henry Collins, Nathan Townsend, Jr., James Hony- 
man, Jr., Jeremy Condy, Samuel Wickham, Thomas Ward, Josiah 
Lyndon, John Callender, Jr., Sueton Grant, Dr. John Brett, Captain 
Charles Bardin, Hezekiah Carpenter, Joshua Jacobs, Joseph Syl- 
vester, John Checkley, Jr., William Ellery, John Adams, Daniel 
Hubbard, John Wallace, Stephen Hopkins and Samuel Johnston, 
nearly all of them men whose influence was commanding. 

Dean Berkeley, realizing that in all probability there would be 
some delay in securing the grant that would enable him to establish 
the projected college at Bermuda (the object of his visit to America), 
prepared to make himself comfortable during his stay by buying a 
farm of ninety-six acres and building thereon a modest house, 
which he called Whitehall. There he resided till the autumn of 
1 73 1, when, in September, he embarked from Boston for England. 
After his return to England he gave Whitehall to Yale College with 
a valuable collection of books, a list of which may be found in an 
article on " Bishop Berkeley's Gifts to Yale College," by Daniel C. 
Gilman, Vol. I. of " Papers of the New Haven Colony Historical 
Society." He also gave valuable books to Harvard College and 
Trinity Church, Newport. To the Church he gave seventy-five 
volumes, some of which are still in the possession of the Church, 
with many of the volumes sent out by the Society for the Propaga- 
tion of the Gospel in Foreign Parts when the parish was in its 
infancy. 



5° 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 







WHITEHALL. 



CHAPTER III. 



I 73i~ I 737- 



The officers of the Church on the 5th day of July, 173 1, were : 

Rev. James Honyman, Minister. 

Captain William Wanton, | 

. > Church Wardens. 

Captain Jonathan Thurston, J 

Vestry. — Nathaniel Kay, Col. William Wanton, Capt. John Brown, 

Col. Wm. Coddington, George Goulding, Daniel Ayrault, Col. 

William Whiting, Capt. John Freebody, Capt. Henry Bull, Capt. 

Godfrey Malbone, Capt. John Brown, Jr., Capt. John Chase, Jahleel 

Brenton, Jr., Daniel Updike, John Gidley, Peter Bours, and James 

Martin. 



James Martin was appointed Clerk of the Vestry. 
Ordered: that the Church Wardens do all things necessary for 
the repairing of the bell, and have the fence and gates painted. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 51 

Ordered : that Captain Robert Elliot 43 be invested with the prop- 
erty of the pew No. 30, for the consideration of £%0, he paying the 
same within a month, or else the pew to be returned. 

Thomas Salter to have pew No. 2<3 in the gallery, he paying for 
the same £12.10. 

Voted : that the Vestry meet the first Tuesday in every second 
month ensuing. 

On the nth of June of this year, Dean Berkeley baptized three 
of his negroes, " Philip, Anthony and Agnes Berkeley." 

August 27, 1 73 1. Nathaniel Kay, Esq., is desired to write to Mr. 
Richard Munday to meet the Vestry on Monday next at 1 1 o'clock, 
in the forenoon, at the Church, to consider about repairing the 
steeple. 44 

43 Capt. Robert Elliot was married to Almy Coggeshall, by Mr. Hony- 
man, January 1, 1730. His second wife was Abigail Searing, to whom 
he was married July 21, 1765. Immediately after the Declaration of In- 
dependence, he was appointed a Captain of Artillery, and did service in 
that capacity. He was a Deputy from Newport to the General Assembly ; 
subsequently he was appointed Intendant of Trade for Newport, and died 
in 1 781, while holding that office. 

44 There is nothing to show who built the Church edifice, but, apart from 
the prominence of Richard Munday as a builder, his connection with the 
Church, and the manner in which he was frequently called upon to ex- 
amine the structure and make good the defects that from time to time ap- 
peared, leads to the conclusion that the edifice was built under his super- 
vision. The plans were evidently sent out from England. The general 
features of the interior are not unlike those of St. James, London. The 
details are of the colonial period ; the groined ceiling is remarkably fine; 
the pulpit, reading desk and clerk's desk stand out in the body of the 
Church, the pulpit being reached by a high flight of stairs, with spiral 
newel and balusters. Over the pulpit there hangs a graceful sounding- 
board. The chancel, elliptical in form, is shallow, and not more than 
nine or ten can kneel at the rail at a time. The organ is in the gallery, 
at the opposite end of the Church. The pews are square, with high, 
straight backs. 



52 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that the Church Wardens do forthwith have an air-hole 
made in the under-pinning of the Church, to prevent the same from 
rotting. 44 * 

Voted: that Capt John Chase and Mr. George Dunbar be de- 
sired to assist the Church Wardens in providing and getting mate- 
rials for repairing the steeple, and other things necessary for the 
Church. 

August 30, 1 73 1. Voted: that the committee appointed for the 
repairing of the steeple do agree with some person for the doing 
thereof as they shall think proper, with the advice of Mr. Richard 
Munday, and provide materials for the same. 45 

September 5 , 1 73 1 . Lucia Berkeley, daughter (an infant) of Dean 
Berkeley, died, and was buried in the churchyard, just south of the 
grave of Nathaniel Kay. She was baptized by her father on the 
24th of the previous August. 

Voted : that Sarah Velvin be invested in the property of the 
northwest corner pew of the five new pews lately built, she having 
paid for the same the sum of ,£10 to Capt. William Wanton. 46 

u& No provision was made for a cellar when the Church was built, and 
the only means of ventilating the beams is by "air-holes " in the low foun- 
dation. A few years ago so much of the earth was removed as was necessary 
to admit of setting a couple of furnaces, now used to heat the Church. 

45 From this and other like entries from time to time it is evident that, 
while the edifice was so far finished when it was said to be complete, in 
1726, as to admit of its being used for services, only pews enough had 
been provided for the actual wants of the congregation at that day, and 
that from time to time other pews were built and disposed of to appli- 
cants. 

46 Captain William Wanton, the Senior Warden, was, like many other 
members of the Wanton family, a distinguished man. The manner of 
his becoming an Episcopalian is a tradition, one that is generally received 
as correct. The son of a Quaker preacher, Edward Wanton, he was him- 
self a Quaker. He fell in love with Ruth Bryant, the beautiful and ac- 
complished daughter of Deacon John Bryant, of Scituate, Mass., an 



>i tne i^oiony 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 53 

September 23, 1 73 1. James Honyman 47 was married to Elizabeth 
Goulding. 

March 21, 1732. It is agreed that Capt. John Chace, Capt. 
George Wanton, and James Martin do audit and inspect all the ac- 

uncompromising Presbyterian, who would not listen to such a connection. 
When out spake William Wanton, and said : " Ruth, I am sure we were 
made for each other; let us break away from this unreasonable bondage. 
I will give up my religion and thou shalt give up thine, and we will go 
to the Church of England and the devil together." 

The public services that William Wanton rendered the Colony, and his 
valiant deeds in his early manhood, have been recorded. To the Church 
both he and his wife became devoted. In 1732 he was elected Governor 
of the Colony, and died while in office, in January, 1733, aged 63 years. 

was the son of Rev. James Honyman, 
^Minister of Trinity Church. He was 
OrV*4*P\ i QfL/ born at Newport, and was educated for 
(j the Bar. In 1732 he was elected Attor- 

ney-General of the Colony, which office he held till 1741, when the elec- 
tion of County Attorneys was introduced, when he held the office of 
King's Attorney for two years. He was one of the committee on the 
boundary question between Rhode Island and Massachusetts, and was 
appointed, with Governor Hopkins and George Brown, to attend the 
Congress of Governors and Commissioners of the Northern Colonies, 
called by Lord Loudoun, and held in Boston, to devise measures for the 
defeat of the enemy. In 1756 he was elected First Assistant of the 
Colony, and was re-elected up to 1764; but when the Legislature remon- 
strated against the rule of 1756 (which rule occasioned great losses and 
great irritation in the Colonies) he declined a re-election. 

Shortly after this event, Mr. Honyman was appointed King's Advocate 
for the Court of Vice Admiralty in Rhode Island, and retained the ap- 
pointment up to the breaking out of the revolution. In that struggle and 
when hostilities began, he offered to give up his commission, if the Leg- 
islature desired him to do so. The Legislature so desired, and his com- 
mission was delivered to the Governor, to be lodged in the Secretary's 
office. 

Mr. Honyman had an extensive and lucrative practice when the war 
broke out. He did not leave the Island on the approach of the British, 
but remained here, and here died February 15, 1788, aged 67 years. 



54 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

counts, beginning with the committee for building, and pass accounts 
from one to the other, and to make a final end thereof, with a return 
of the same to the Vestry next Easter Tuesday. 

It is agreed and ordered that Mr. Edward Scott and Mr. James 
Honyman, Jr., be desired to go about, in order to collect what money 
they can for and towards the support and assistance of Mr. Beach, 48 
a gentleman of Connecticut, who is going to London to have Epis- 
copal ordination, and make a return of their doings herein next 
Easter Tuesday. 

At an Annual Meeting of the Vestry, for the choice of Church 
officers, on Easter Monday, being the loth of April, 1732, Captain 
Jonathan Thurston and James Martin were chosen Church Wardens. 

Voted: that Mr. James Allen, Captain Samuel Wickham, and 
Mr. Edward Scott be admitted members of the Vestry for said 
Trinity Church. 

Adjourned Meeting, April 1 1, 1732. William Weston has agreed 
to take .£44 for the balance of his account for the fence around the 
churchyard, and gates thereto, in full. 

It is the opinion of the Vestry that he allow to the Church the 
sum of thirty pounds for the ground where he has erected his vault 
in the churchyard. 49 

Mr. Peter Bours, Capt. Godfrey Malbone, 50 Mr. Edward Scott 51 

48 Mr. John Beach went to England to receive Holy Orders, returned 
in September, 1732 and began his labors as Missionary, at Newtown, Ct. 
He had been a preacher sixty years when he died, in 1782. In 1772 he 
stated that in forty years he had lost but two Sundays through sickness. 

49 There is no trace at the present day of any such vault. 
, was a native of Princess 

r/Y) /?/?/ Anne County, Virginia. 

\£4>/[/ / CtidcClrpriS- ^ He came to Newport 

*r about 1700, and here 







settled. The tradition 
is that he had a strong desire to follow the sea, and to this end bound him- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 55 

and Captain George Wanton do agree to gather in the subscriptions 
quarterly, as they become due, each man in his turn, as they are 
above named. 

Ordered : that John Barzee [the sexton] be paid his half year, end- 
ing the 29th of March, 1732, the sum of £$. 

John Barzee has engaged for sexton another year, for ,£15. 

Ordered : that the money belonging 52 to the poor be delivered to 
the eldest Church Warden, he giving a bond for the same, payable 
to the Minister with lawful interest, and the bond to be renewed 
every year. 

self to some captain. While serving out his time, he came into possession of 
a valuable estate in Virginia, which enabled him to shape his own course. 
Here he became eminent as a merchant, and was active in fitting out pri- 
vateers in the French and Spanish wars. At the request of Governor 
Shirley, he was commissioned to raise a regiment of three hundred and 
fifty men in Rhode Island, to join the expedition against Louisburg. 

In 1766 Col. Malbone's beautiful country seat was destroyed by fire. 
He died February 22, 1768, and was buried under Trinity Church. 
October 18, 1719, he was married to Katharine Scott, who survived him, 
and died in Boston in 181 7. Her remains were brought to Newport and 
interred in the churchyard. The autograph at the head of this note was 
taken from an old deed, but the name as generally given has only one " 1." 
s 1 ^~ /) m was the granduncle of Sir Walter 



7) I "^ sfns+44-—' Scott. For more than twenty years 



&7~£7 /**/ Is+S j ie was master f t ] ie grammar 

school in Newport, the first classical school in Rhode Island. He was an 
active member of the Philosophical Society. On the tombstone of his 
father, Edward Scott, there is this inscription : 

" This Monument Is sacred to the Memory of Edward Scott, Esq., Who 
departed this life June 30, 1708, aged 65 years. Having for many years 
served His country By a faithful life & discharge of several important 
offices of government, preserving throughout his life That noblest of 
characters, An Honest Man." 

a Lacking other modes of putting money out to interest, it was the 
custom to put funds in the hands of some person of known probity 
engaged in business who could use it, and who gave bonds, as above, for 
its return with interest. 



5 6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

April 25, 1732. Benjamin Brenton 53 was married to Alice 
Barker. 

May 2, 1732. John Norton paid James Martin ten pounds for 
the middle pew of the five new pews lately built at the west end of 
the gallery, for which he is to account, and the said Thomas Norton 
is to be invested with the property. 

November 20, 1732. Voted and resolved: that every person that 
has subscribed anything towards discharging the Church debts, and 
every person that is indebted otherwise to the Church, pay in their 
subscriptions and debts on Thursday the 30th instant, and that Capt. 
John Freebody and Mr. Daniel Ayrauit be desired to attend them 
with their bonds in order to have them discharged. 

November 30, 1732. Mr. Ayrauit 54 has discounted, in part of his 
bond, thirty pounds for the vault in the churchyard, which is in full 
of what he was to give for it. 

Mr. Ayrault's bond discharged in y e Vestry. 

Mr. John Lance is desired to set the Psalms in the Church. 

December 22, 1732. Ordered: that Capt. John Chace, Mr. Ed- 
ward Scott and James Martin be a committee to draw up an instru- 
ment, to be put on the public record, for the dedication of Trinity 
Church, and that the same be prepared for the next Vestry. 55 

53 Benjamin Brenton died April 1, 1766, and was buried on his farm in 
Narragansett. 

51 This was Daniel Ayrauit. The vault is under the tombstone that 
bears the name of his wife, Mary Ayrauit, who had died January 5, 1729, 
and whose remains he placed in the vault when it was completed. The 
entrance is under the flagstones of the walk leading to the north door of 
the church, and is reached by steps under the walk. 

55 The following document is all that is now known in regard to the 
above movement. It is recorded in the City Clerk's office, and not on the 
records of the Church : 

" To all People to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting : Whereas, 
Francis Brinley, of Boston, in the County of Suffolk and Province of the 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 57 

February 25. 1733. Voted: that the Church Wardens write to 
Mr. Charles Theodore Perchival, in Boston, to acquaint him that the 
organ is arrived for the Church, and that he is desired to come up 
here and assist us with his advice, in putting the same up, and that 



Massachusetts Bay in New England, gentleman, & Deborah his wife did 
by their Deed of Sale, bearing date the Third day of < )< tuber, in the year 
of our Lord one Thousand seven hundred & twenty, Grant, bargain, 
sell, alien, convey & confirm unto Daniel Ayrault & \V m Gibbs, 
both of Newport, in the County of Newport, & Colony of Rhode 
Island. &c, the then Church Wardens of Trinity Church in Newport 
afores 1 , & to their successors in said office forever, A certain piece, par- 
cel, or lot of land, situate lying & being in Newport afores* 1 , butted & 
bounded as follows : East on land belonging to Peleg Sanford, late of s d 
Newport, Esq', deceased, South upon a way between the land of the said 
Francis Brinley & the land of Caleb Carr, late of s d Newport, Esq', de- 
ceased, West on land belonging to s 4 Francis Brinley, & North partly 
on land belonging to said Trinity Church, <\- partly on land belonging 
to the Reverend James Honyman, of s d Newport, Clerk : The said Prem- 
ises measuring & containing one hundred & one feet on the south 
line, ninety-three feet & a half on ye north line, forty-six feet on the 
west line, & fifty feet on the east line, or however otherwise butted & 
bounded, as in & by the s d recited Deed, reference thereto being had 
will now full\ & at large appear ; And Whereas, the Minister, Church 
Wardens & Vestry of said Trinity Church, did at their meeting held in 
s d Church, on the Tenth day of September in the year of our Lord one 
thousand seven hundred twenty & three, unanimously agree to erect 
& build a new Church on the afores* Piece or Parcel of land with the 
free & voluntary subscription of well disposed persons, & then nomi- 
nated & appointed W m Wanton, W m Coddington, Henry Bull, Godfrey 
Malibone & John Chare, all of Newport, afores'd, & the s rt Daniel 
Ayrault to be a committee for the overseeing & superintending s d work, 
which building has been perfected & named Trinity Church : Now 
Know Ye, that we, the Rector, Church Wardens & Vestry (represent- 
ing the congregation ) of s d Church, do hereby dedicate & devote s d 
Trinity Church to the Publick worship of God, according to the Liturgy 
of the Church of England as by law established. 

In Testimony whereof, we, the said Rector, Church Wardens &: Ves- 

'5 



5* 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



he shall be satisfied for his assistance in the affair. And also to Mr. 
Richard Munday, to desire him to come here forthwith, to advise 
and assist us in preparing a plan to set up the organ m in this Church. 



trymen have hereunto subscribed our names cS; affixed our seals at a 
meeting held in said Trinity Church on Easter Monday, being the twenty- 
sixth day of March, in ye sixth year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord 
George the Second, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France & 
Ireland, King, defender of the Faith, Sec, Anno Domini 1733. 

James Honvman, [l.s. 

James Martin, [l.s. 

Jahleel Brenton, [l.s. 

Nath l - Kay, [l.s. 

w m coddington, [l.s. 

Godfrey Malbone, [l.s. 

W M - Wanton, J e - [l.s. 

Jno. Chace, [l.s. 

Jno. Brown, [l.s. 

George Wanton, [l.s. 

Jon n - Thurston, [l.s. 

Edward Scott, [l.s. 

J. HONYMAN, [ L - s ] 

RlC D - MuMFORD, [L.S.] 

Signed & sealed in s d meeting, 
in the presence of us. 

William Jones, Jun r - 
John Lance. 
Recorded, June 27, 1733, 

per W M - Coddington, T. C. K. 

56 The gift of an organ to Trinity Church from Dean Berkeley quickly 
followed his departure from Newport, and the receipt of it must have filled 
the hearts of the congregation with joy. Some change had evidently to 
be made in the gallery at the west end of the church, to receive it, but to 
what extent cannot now be shown. The pipes, etc., were long since so 
worn as to make it necessary to replace them, but the case of English 
oak, beautiful in design and as beautifully made, remains as of old; sur- 
mounted in the centre by a crown, and on either hand a Bishop's mitre. 

To meet modern demands and to secure a larger compass, the organ has 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 59 

The Rev. Mr. Honyman is desired to draw up a letter of thanks to 
the Rev. Mr. Dean Berkeley, for his generous present of an organ to 
this Church, and likewise a letter of thanks to Mr. Henry Newman, 
for his care about and shipping the same; in order to be sent to 
England as soon as conveniently may be. 

Voted: that Capt. Jonathan Thurston and Capt. Richard Mum- 
ford are appointed to go about to get subscriptions for ^250 to 
defray the charges of setting up the organ and satisfying Mr. Per- 
chival and Mr. Mundayfor their assistance in said affair, painting ye 
Church and securing the tower from injury from the weather. 

Adjourned till the arrival of Mr. Perchival. 

March 8, 1733. Voted : that the letter of thanks to the Rev. Mr. 
Dean Berkeley for the present of the organ to this Church, and 
likewise the letter of thanks to Mr. Henry Newman for his care and 
trouble in getting the same done, and shipping thereof, drawn up by 
the Rev. Mr. Honyman, is approved of and signed in the Vestry, 
and ordered to be sent home forthwith. 

At a Vestry held at Trinity Church, in Newport, on Easter Mon- 
day, being y e 26 th day of March, 1733 : 

Capt. Jonathan Thurston, having served as Church Warden for 
two years, was dismissed with the thanks of y" congregation, and 
James Martin elected in his room as eldest Church Warden, and 
Jahleel Brenton, Esq., chosen in y e room of said Martin to serve for 
ye ensuing year. 

Mr James Honyman is admitted a vestryman, and Capt. Richard 
Mumford is admitted another. 

Voted : that John Lance is allowed his pew that he sits in, in the 
gallery, for his past service done the Church, upon the same footing 
of those who purchased it. 



in recent years been greatly enlarged, by adding wings, attached to the 
old case, which latter is made the < entral portion. 



60 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that John Grelea is allowed .£10 for his past services when 
he went to sea, and is chosen clerk for the year ensuing at the salary 
of thirty pounds. 

John Grelea paid the £\o in the Vestry. 

Voted : that for the ensuing year the Church Wardens receive the 
contributions and the money collected for the subscriptions, and to 
pay the Rev. Mr. Honyman ^200 57 for y e ensuing year by quarterly 
payments of .£50, and the subscriptions to be gathered in by Mr. 
Richard Mumford for the two first quarters, Mr. Edward Scott the 
third quarter, and Capt. Jonathan Thurston for the last quarter. 

Voted and ordered : that the poor's money be put out at lawful 
interest for the benefit of the poor, except £ 10, to be left in the Church 
Warden's hands. 

Ordered : that Jahleel Brenton, Esq., and Capt. Godfrey Malbone 
be empowered to purchase oil and colors for the painting the Church 
without and [illegible] within, as soon as they conveniently can, and 
they agree with a workman for that purpose ; and likewise to get a 
frame for an altar piece. 

Voted : that John Barzee be allowed ^"20 for the ensuing year, 
and to ring the bell at 9 o'clock at night, and for y e same to get what 
subscriptions he can. 

Ordered: that the legacy of James Cranston, deceased, of i^ioo, 
be paid to Mr. Daniel Ayrault, and that the same be in his hands 
till further orders of the Vestry. 

August 27, 1733. Jahleel Brenton,'" Esq., having presented the 



Paper money was then so depreciated that it was not worth more than 
three to one of silver. 

he donor of the clock, was a 
ich friend of the Church. 

J He married. May ^o, 1715, 

Frances Cranston, daughter of Governor Samuel Cranston, who bore him 
fifteen children. 1 1 is second wife, to whom he was married April 25, 



C>^t^^^L^Zi^t^^L-_ staun< 



NEWPORT, RHODJi ISLAND. 61 

Church with a clock,' 5 ' the Vestry, in behalf of the Church, do return 
him thanks for so generous a donation. 

Voted: that the Church Wardens have a case erected over said 
clock forthwith, to secure it from the wind and weather. 

Voted: that the one hundred pounds given to said Church by 
Mr. James Cranston, and now in the hands of James Martin, be put 
out to interest till the Vestry calls for the same, and the Church 
Wardens are hereby empowered to do it. 

May 14, 1733. Voted: that Captain Richard Perkin's legacy to 
the Church be appropriated for the purchase of a flagon for the 
communion table. 

Nathaniel Kay, Esq., agreed to purchase another of the same 
value. 1 " 

Voted : that James Martin forthw ith draw up a proper instrument, 
in order to collect by subscription money sufficient to defray the 
charge of painting the Church, and that Mr. Peter Bouts and said 
Martin go about therewith. 

September 10, 1733. Benjamin Wanton was baptized. 



1744. was Mar)" Scott, daughter of Stephen Ayrault, and widow of George 
Scott, by whom he had seven more children. His son, Sir Jahleel Bren- 
ton. who was the author of a number of books, died an admiral in the 
British navy. One of his nephews also became an admiral. One 
daughter, Susannah, married Dr. John Halliburton, January 4, 1767, and 
went with him to Halifax, and another daughter married Rev. (olin Eliot, 
of Gilford, Conn., son of the Indian apostle. Mr. Brenton died in 1707. 
He was an original member of the artillery company, and one of the 
committee to build the State House, 1739. 

69 The clock was made by f^tf/^P / tlle e l ectri - 

eian and friend of Franklin. y(fcy£/j^. /7f) 1 rffi ^ His early and 

successful experiments with ^t^/O ^%7^ ^electricity 

were remarkable. He died ^^ L/(y m B Q; > ton > 
December 15, 1736, aged 75 years. 

60 These two flagons have been in use until a very recent day. They 

are massive, are alike in design, and are eleven and a half inches high. 



62 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

November 25, 1733. Mary Honyman, daughter of James Hony- 
man, Jr., was baptized. 

At a Vestry held at Trinity Church in Newport, on Easter Mon- 
day, the 15th day of April, 1734: 

Jahleel Brenton, Esq., and Mr. John Gidley were chosen Church 
Wardens. Vestrymen : Col. William Coddington, Capt. Godfrey 
Malbone, Capt. Henry Bull, 01 Mr. Peter Bours, Mr. John Gid- 
ley, Col. Daniel Updike, Capt. Samuel Wickham, Capt. Richard 
Mumford, Mr. James Allen, Mr. James Honyman, Jr., Mr. Edward 
Scott and Mr. George Dunbar. 

Voted : that £200 be allowed the Rev. Mr. Honyman for the 
ensuing year. 



That given by Mr. Kay appears, from the date upon it, to have been 
made first. The inscription in each case is on a mantling. 

The flagon given by Mr. Kay bears this inscription : 

An Oblation 
from Nathaniel Kay a Publican 
for the use of the blessed Sacra- 
ment in the Church of England 
in Rhode Island. 

*733- 

Lux perpetua 
Credentibus Sola. 



^W*/? HmM~^ 



grandson of the first settler 
of that name, was born No- 
vember 23, 1687. He was 
a man of strong character and attained to an influential position— a Repre- 
sentative to the General Assembly, Attorney-General in 1721, Speaker 
of the House of Representatives in 1728-9, and one of the Commissioners 
to settle the boundary dispute between Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 
And when the Court of Common Pleas was established, he was appointed 
Chief-Justice for Newport County. He died December 24, 1771, aged 
85 years. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 63 

Voted : that i'ju be allowed Mr. John Grelea as clerk for the en- 
suing year. 

Ordered: that Robert Oliver and Miller Frost have the pew No. 
20 in the gallery, in lieu of the pew that was formerly said Oliver's 
and Alexander Brown's, taken up for placing the organ. 

Ordered : that the pew in the gallery, No. 23 (that was Nathaniel 
Norton's) be for Mordecai Dunbar, in lieu of his pew that was taken 
up for the placing of the organ, and the Church to pay the said 
Norton the money he gave for the pew. 

Ordered : that Capt. Samuel Wickham, Capt. Jonathan Thurston, 
Mr. Peter Bours and Mr. Edward Scott, are appointed to get in the 
subscriptions for the Church officers, and Mr. Charles Theodore 
Perchival, as the same shall come due quarterly. 

June 24, 1734. Lawrence Lang worthy"-' was married to Mary 
Lawton. 

July 8, 1734. Mr. John Gidley has complied with the legacy left 
by Capt. Richard Perkins to Trinity Church, in full as executor. 

Ordered : that the Minister and Church Wardens receive of Mrs. 
Ann Kay, the i.~20oleft Trinity Church by her late husband, Nathaniel 
Kay, Esq., deceased : viz. ^100 to and for the poor of said Church 
and the other ^100 for the use of said Church, and that the same be 
applied accordingly. 

James Martin paid the sum of one hundred pounds (which he 
received of the executors of James Cranston, deceased, and passed 
by his receipt to the same) to Jahleel Brenton, which was paid by 
said Brenton to Mr. Charles Theodore Parchival, for his services, 
&c, in setting up the organ in the Church. 



62 Lawrence Langworthy was of Ashburton, County of Devon, and died 
here October 19. 1739. His wife, from the same county, died before 
him. The name was perpetuated in Newport for some time. Jonathan 
Langworthy died here April 13, 1800, aged 84 years. 



64 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

April 7, 1735. At a meeting held in Trinity Church ; present, 
the Rev. Mr. James Honyman, Rector; Jahleel Brenton, Esq., and 
Mr. John Gidley/ 3 Church Wardens, and some part of the congre- 
gation. 

Mr. John Gidley chosen eldest Church Warden, in the room of 
Jahleel Brenton, Esq., and Capt. Samuel Wickham chosen younger 
Church Warden, in the room of Mr. John Gidley, for the year 
ensuing. 

Mr. John Grelea chosen clerk for the year ensuing at his former 
salary. 

John Barzee chosen sexton for the year ensuing at his former 
salary. 

Ordered : that the widow Norton have the south pew in the upper 
gallery at the west end of the Church, in lieu of the pew that her 
son formerly purchased, which was taken from her by the placing 
of the organ. 

April 8, 1735. The Vestry made an offer to Mr. Charles Theo- 
dore Parchival of the same salary that he had for the preceding 
year, which he declined to accept of, whereupon he was desired to 
officiate in the service of the Church as organist during his stay in 
this place, and agreed that he should be paid for the same in pro- 
portion to the allowance made him for the last year, for the time he 

63 John Gidley was a prosperous and enterprising merchant at the time 
that he was killed by a gunpowder explosion in 1744. In the church- 
yard there are monuments to the memory of a number of the Gidley 
family. The first is that of John Gidley, "of Exon, in Devon, Great 
Britain," a " Fuller," who died April 28, 1710. In the same grave rest 
the remains of his wife, Sarah, who died May 9, 1742, and of Sarah, 
his daughter and wife of John Vine. On the stone there is this further 
inscription : 

" This tomb I desire may not be opened until it is demolished by time, 
it being filled up." 



Newport, rhode island. 6 5 

shall perform such service ; and that the Vestry did then agree to 
take proper methods for the supplying the said Church with an 
organist. 

May 14, 1735. Elizabeth Martin, wife of James Martin, 64 died, 
in her 33d year. 

September 18, 1 735. Charles Bardin 1 " was married to Ann 
Carr. 

Ordered : that the pew in the northwest corner, in the gallery, 
the property thereof is invested in Mr. Thomas Huxham, according 
to the rules of the Church, he having paid ,£20 for the same to Mr. 
John Gidley, Church Warden. 

December 26, 1735. Ordered: that the two Church Wardens and 
James Martin be appointed to write (with the assistance of the Rev. 
Mr. Honyman) to Mr. Henry Newman, in London, to procure an 
organist for said Church, and that he be empowered to offer to a 
proper person for such a purpose the sum of twenty pounds sterling 
per annum. 



64 William Gardiner was a descendant of Joseph Gardiner, one of the 
first settlers of Narragansett. He married Elizabeth Gibbs, daughter 
of William Gibbs, April 16, 1719, and his sister, Hannah, became 
the wife of Rev. Dr. McSparran. Gibbs's widow married James Martin 
April 9, 1732, and died as above stated. Martin was born in Houston, 
Devonshire County, England, and was a man of some prominence. He 
was Secretary of the Colony from 1733 up to the time of his death, in 
February, 1746. His second wife was Mary Kennedy, to whom he was 
married December 28, 1741, by Mr. Hon) man. William Gibbs was not 
connected with the family of George Gibbs. 

was born in London, July 13, 
-j. 1700, and died in Newport June 

U/fU VHv^i, 1 773. Ann Carr, his wife, 
died August 29, 1805, aged 92 years. Capt. Bardin had some knowledge 
of music, was competent to play on the organ, and occasionally served as 
organist, as will appear. 




66 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Ordered : that Capt. Charles Bardin is ordered to assist Robert 
Mason in instructing him in playing on the spinnet. 

Ordered : that the Church Wardens are desired to advise with 
John Proud 00 about the clock, in order to have it in better order. 

Easter Monday, April 26, 1736. At a Vestry, Capt. Samuel Wick- 
ham and Mr. Edward Scott were chosen Wardens. 

May 10, 1736. Adjourned meeting. Voted: that Capt. John 
Brown and Capt. Godfrey Malbone be desired to agree with Mr. 
David Wyatt, or some other person, to paint the Church, and that 
Capt. Samuel Wickham and Mr. Edward Scott get subscriptions for 
discharging the same. 

Voted : that Messrs. George Scott and Daniel Ayrault be desired 
to collect the subscriptions for the Minister, &c, for ye ensuing 
year. 

Ordered : that there be lent to Mr. John Grelea the sum of ^40, 
without interest, for one year, out of the poor money, he giving a 
note for the same to the Church Wardens, and to serve for the ensuing 
year, or to return the money again ; and in case of any accident the 
Vestry to make good the money to the poor at the year's end. 

May 22, 1736. William Tate ' was married to Mary Iverson. 

June 24, 1736. Adjourned meeting after prayers. 

Voted : that Mr. John Owen Jacobi [who had been induced to come 
out from England as organist, and had just arrived] be allowed the 
sum of £2$ sterling, as organist for the Church, for the year ensuing 
if he thinks proper to accept thereof, and that the Church Wardens 
wait upon him to acquaint him with the result of this Vestry. 

m John Proud was a cloekmaker. He was succeeded in business by his 
son Robert, who eked out a living by adding to his calling the extracting 
of teeth. 

67 William Tate was a blacksmith, who, in his will, gave his estate, 
after the death of his wife, to the Church, and which will be noticed in 
place. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 67 

Voted : that the two east doors, 68 on the north and south side of 
the Church, be shut up and pews made there, and that two pews be 
made of each side of the steps of the altar, and thatany person that 
purchases the side pews shall pay for the ground-rent ^,50 each, and 
build the pew and make the window at each of their respective 
charges ; and the other two end pews to be valued at £ 50 each like- 
wise, and the purchasers to build their own pews. 

September 21, 1736. An account of /jiS.15 exhibited by Mr. 
John Owen Jacobi, for the amount of his passage and expenses more 
than the 10 guineas advanced by Mr. Ha)- in London, is allowed 
and ordered to be paid out of the money arising from the new- 
pews. 

Ordered: that the ,£10.10 sterling, advanced by Mr. Hay in 
London for Mr. John Owen Jacobi, be paid to the Rev. Mr. James 
Honyman, at the rate of four hundred and fifty per cent., for the use 
of said Hay. 

Ordered : that an abatement of £\o be made to Capt. Robert 
Oliver, his pew being smaller than that on the north side of the 
altar. 

68 There was at that time no vestry room where the vestry room now 
stands, but a door leading direetly to the street, with a similar door on the 
south side of the chancel, also opening upon Spring street. These were 
the doors ordered to be closed up. Windows were set in their places and 
new pews were made there. The two pews at the side of the chancel 
steps are the ones there now — one under the monument to Rev. Mar- 
maduke Browne, and the other under the one to the Rev. Salmon 
Wheaton, D.D. 



68 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



CHAPTER IV. 

i 737- 1 745- 

Easter Monday, April ti, 1737. Mr. Edward Scott and Mr. 
Daniel Ayrault, Jr., elected Wardens. 

Capt. Charles Bardin, Dr. John Brett 09 and Capt. Caleb Godfrey 
are admitted Vestrymen of the Church. 

Voted : that the officers of the Church be continued for the 
ensuing year at the same salaries. 

Mr. Ninyan Chaloner, Peleg Brown, Esq., and Capt. George Scott 
are admitted Vestrymen. 

At an adjourned meeting, the following day. Ordered : that the 
tower be repaired, for the preservation of the clock, and that the 
account of Mr. Claggett, amounting to £$, be paid. 

Mr. John Grelea and John Barzee, refusing to serve this year for 
their former salaries, ordered that the Church Wardens speak to 
Mr. John Lance, in order to agree with him to officiate as Clerk, 
and to Mr. Jeffers to officiate as sexton. 

Capt. Charles Bardin is desired to go about with a subscription, 
to raise money to make up what was borrowed of y 8 poor money, 
repair the steeple and make up the fence, being about £100. 

May 2, 1737. Ordered: that Mr. John Lance be continued as 
clerk for this year, 'till next Easter Monday, unless he of himself 
declines in the meantime. 

m But little is known of Dr. John Brett, other than that he was a native 
of Germany and a graduate of the University of Leyden. He was a 
scholarly man and early contributed to the collection of books for the 
Redwood Library. He was married, by Mr. Honyman, to Mary How- 
land, February 10, 1739. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. . 69 

[Rev. Mr. Honvman began now to show signs of failing health. 
In a letter to the Society, under date of July 6, [737, he made it 
known "that he hat! been very much weakened by a long dis- 
tion, but he had not omitted his duty in preaching twice every 
Sunday; in observing every festival ; in reading prayers and cate- 
chising twice a week in Lent; and he may affirm with great truth, 
that his congregation was the largest and most flourishing of any 
in those parts."] 

Easter Monday, April 3, 1738. Mr. Daniel Ayrault [Jr.] chosen 
eldest Church Warden, and Mr. William Mumford the other 
Warden. 

George Dunbar, Esq., and Mr. Lawrence Langworthy are ad- 
mitted Vestrymen. 

Voted : that the salary of the clerk, Mr. John Grelea, be £$0 
and Mr. John Lance was allowed £30 for his last year's service, 

April 7, 1758. Ordered: that the Church Wardens advise with 
Mr. Munday about making a pew in the northeast part of the gal- 
lery, for Capt. Nichols White, and that the}' agree with the said 
Mr. White for the value thereof; and in case they can't agree with 
him, to accommodate any other person therewith that has a mind to 
purchase. 

Easter Monday, April 23, 1739. Mr. William Mumford and Mr. 
Joseph Wanton chosen Wardens. The Vestry remains the same 
as last year, with the addition of Mr. Jonah Bailey. 

The organist, clerk and sexton are continued for the ensuing year 
upon the same salaries. 

May 8, 1739. Ordered: that the Church Wardens, with the as- 
sistance of Capt. John Brown, agree with Mr. John Allen to finish 
the painting of the Church on the outside, and that the Church 
Wardens collect the subscriptions in that are signed for that end. 

Ordered: that the Church Wardens advise with Mr. Mundav and 



;o ■ ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

desire him to inspect into the state of the tower, and that the same 
be repaired forthwith. 

Ordered : that there be a pavement of flat stones, from the west- 
ernmost gate to the Church door opposite to it [the present walk 
from Church street to the north door] and that Mr. George Gould- 
ing be desired to speak with Mr. Johnson, of Connecticut, about the 
stones. 

Ordered : that £10 be added to the salary of Mr. John Grelea, for 
the year. 

August 14, 1739. Ordered: that the subscriptions be continued, 
and that' the Church Wardens carry the boxes round to receive the 
contributions below stairs, and that Capt. Charles Bardin, and Mr. 
James Gould be appointed to do the same above stairs in the gal- 
leries. 

August 18. Penelope Honyman 70 was baptized by her grand- 
father, Rev. Mr. Honyman. 

December 23. Isaac Stelle 7 ' was married to Penelope Goodson. 

[Towards the close of this year the bell, the gift of Queen Anne, 
that had hung in the tower since 1709, and which was prized not 
only by the congregation, but by the whole town, was found to be 
cracked and no longer fit for service. Measures were at once taken 
to replace it.] 

December 26, 1739. The Church Wardens are desired to write 
to the Rev. Mr. Caner, of Fairfield, and inquire at what price the 



70 Penelope Honyman, the daughter of James Honyman, Jr., became 
the wife of Rev. George Bisset, Minister of the Church, April 26, 1773, 
went with him to New Brunswick, and died there August 2, 1816, aged 70 
years. 

'' Isaac Stelle was engaged in commercial pursuits with John Maw'ds- 
lcy and other merchants in Newport, and was one of the syndicate, 1761. 
that sought to control the manufacture of spermaceti, then largely carried 
on in Newport. Mr. Stelle was the owner of "the crewless vessel " that 
came ashore on the beach. See Hull's Memoir of Rhode Island. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 



7i 



founder there will cast our bell for, of 800 lbs. w', and likewise to 
the correspondent at New York, to inquire whether the new bell 
that was brought there from England sometime since, will be dis- 
posed of or not, and find out what it will be disposed of for. 




Easter Monday, April 7, 1740. Joseph Wanton, Esq., and Mr. 
John Bannister, chosen Wardens. No change made in the vestry. 
April 24', 1740. Voted : that the house and lot where Nathaniel 



72 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Kay, Esq., dwelt, together with the lot of land let to Mr. John Ben- 
nett, be let out for the sum of £\$o per annum, and that whoever 
shall have the same, shall give security for the payment of the rent 
quarterly. 

Ordered: that the ,£400 given by Nath 1 Kay, Esq., for the build- 
ing of a grammar school house, be let out to such persons as shall 
hire the same with sufficient sureties. 

May 24, 1740. Oliver Beer 72 was married to Mary Brownell. 

July 17, 1740. Voted : that the bell, which is cracked, be taken 
down forthwith, and shipped by the Church Wardens, on board the 
ship Newport Packet, Wm. Jackson Bonfield, commander, con- 
signed to John Tomlinson, Esq., in London ; and that the Rev. Mr. 
Honyman and the Church Wardens write to him to dispose of said 
bell, and such money as shall be raised by subscription and remitted 
to him, shall be in order to purchase a new bell, of about one thou- 
sand pounds weight. 

December 2, 1740. Sarah Robinson, wife of Robert Robinson, 73 
died, aged 56 years, and was buried in the churchyard. 

December 23, 1740. Stephen Ayrault 74 was married to Ann 
Bours. 

73 Oliver Beer was mate of the brig William, Capt: Benj. H. Rathburn, 
captured by a letter of Marque, from St. Domingo, and was taken to 
France, where he died. For a long time it was supposed that he had been 
lost at sea. 

73 Robert Robinson, Searcher of the Customs in Newport, held offices 
under Queen Anne, George I. and George II. 

74 Stephen Ayrault, third son of the first Daniel Ayrault, was born at 
Fast Greenwich, December 11, 1709. His parents removed to Newport 
the next year, and here he continued to reside. Ann Bours, his wife, 
was the daughter of Peter Bours, by whom he had four daughters but no 
sons. " A pious, Christian, upright merchant and honest man ; uniformly 
discharging the various official and relative duties," says the inscription 
on his tombstone, " through a long life." He died April 16, 1704, aged 
84 years. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 73 

December 29, 1740. Capt. Jonathan Conklin^ having agreed to 
leave the differences between the Church and him to nun, and pro- 
posed Air. Thomas Ward, whom the Vestry approved of; and they 
nominated Mr. James Honyman on their behalf, whom Capt. Conk- 
ling approved of. And it is further agreed between the Vestry and 
said Conkling, if Mr. Ward and Mr. Honyman cannot agree, that 
they shall choose a third man. 

Voted: that the pew lately belonging to Nathaniel Kay, Esq., be 
hereafter the property of Capt. Philip Wilkinson'' 1 and Capt. Jon* 
Conkling, upon their paying for the same ^125. 

Voted : that Capt. Ezbon Sanford be employed by the Church 
Wardens to repair the tower where it is defective. 

Voted: that Messrs. Philip Wilkinson, Daniel Ayrault, Jr., Peleg 
Brown and Edward Scott be a committee to inspect all accounts 
relating to the Church and to audit the same; to discourse with 
Capt. Ezbon Sanford about sashing the Church windows, and build- 
ing a school-house, and letting the lands belonging to the Church. 

January 12, 1741. Ordered: that the Church Wardens collect 



J/U£ r 




was a merchant, and was en- 
r^-^ gaged with Daniel Ayrault, Jr., 
\) in many commercial transac- 
tions. Updyke, in his " History of the Narragansett Church," says he 
was a well-educated and intelligent gentleman, who emigrated from 
the north of Ireland to this country, and resided in Newport, and that 
" his first wife died after migrating to this country." Of her death I find 
no other mention. Capt. Wilkinson married Elizabeth Freebody, daughter 
of John Freebody, April 26, 1736. She died October 24, 1759, aged 46 
years, and lies buried, with members of her father's family, in the common 
ground. October 30, 1763, he married Abigail Brenton, daughter of 
Jahleel Brenton. He died in 1782. June 24, 1 787, his widow married 
Capt. Charles Handy, and died September 10, 1809. She was distin- 
guished for her beauty. Her portrait, greatly admired, long adorned 
the walls of the Redwood Library, where it was deposited. It is now in 
California. 

6 



74 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

the interest due on the bonds for the poor money, and that their 
successors do the same every year hereafter. 

Ordered : that the money belonging to the poor, in the hands of 
Mr. William Mumford, be delivered to Joseph Wanton, Esq., in 
order to be distributed. 

Ordered : that the committee appointed to discourse Capt. Ezbon 
Sanford about building a school-house do agree with him, or some 
other proper person, to build the same, and call in the money that 
was left for the poor to do it with. 

Easter Monday, March 30, 1741. Mr. John Bannister and Mr. 
Peleg Brown chosen Wardens. The Vestry remained the same as 
last year. 

April 5, 1741. Peter James [a successful shipmaster] was married 
to Sarah Harding. 

April 6, 1 74 1. Ordered: that the Church Wardens collect the 
rent due for the house, &c, left to the Church by Nathaniel Kay, 
Esq., and that they repair said house as far as it is requisite, and 
rent the lands. 

September 2, 1741. Voted: that the old subscriptions be gath- 
ered in, to defray the charges of hanging the bell and repairing the 
lead of the tower, and that Messrs. Peleg Brown and Richard 
Mumford collect the same and make report to the next Vestry, to 
be held on Friday, the 1 ith instant. 

September 9, 1741 . Thomas Vernon was married to Jane Brown. 

September II, 1741. Voted: that the Church Wardens imme- 
diately employ proper persons to repair the tower and leads, and 
that they speak to John Proud to enlarge the hammer of the clock. 

Voted: that the Church Wardens inform Capt. John Rouse that 
it is the desire of the Vestry that he take the lock off his pew, and 
admit some person to sit therein, who will allow him something for 
it, and also contribute weekly. 

Voted : that Messrs. Peleg Brown and Stephen Ayrault be de- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAXD. 



75 



sired to go about with a subscription, in order to see what they can 
raise towards paying an organist. 

Voted: that Major Lockman be allowed £\o out of his rent 
towards hanging the great room of the house where he now dwells 
[the Kay estate], he leaving the hangings when he quits the house. 

September 21, 1 74 1 - Capt. Charles Rardin is chosen organist 
for the year ensuing at ,£120 [inflated paper currency] per annum, 
to be paid half-yearly. 

October I, 1741. Matthew Robinson" was married to Bathsheba 
Johnston. 

October 19, 174 1 . The Rev. Mr. Honyman is desired to acquaint 
Mr. Cornelius Bennett that if he is willing to take the school upon 
the following terms, he may enter as soon as the school-house is 
finished, viz., upon the donation given by Nathaniel Kay, Esq., de- 
ceased, amounting to per annum, upon condition of school- 
ing ten poor children, and that the gentlemen belonging to the 
Church will put their children to him for his further encouragement, 
and the same to continue until a school-master, Episcopally ordained, 
shall be admitted, according to the intent of said will, which is pro- 
posed to be done as soon as conveniently may be. 



was born in New- 
port in 1709. He 
was the only son of 
Robert Robinson, 
Searcher of Cus- 
toms in Newport. 
He studied law in 
Boston, and opened 
an office in Newport about 1735. He was a prominent member of the 
Bar. He removed to Narragansett in 1750, and died at South Kingston 
November 4, 1795. Bathsheba Johnston was the widow of Augustus John- 
ston, and daughter of Augustus Lucas. She died soon after their removal 
to Narragansett. 




7 6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Messrs. Scott and Bours are desired to speak with the gentlemen 
belonging to the Church, and endeavor to procure as many scholars 
as they can for the school-master that shall be admitted into the new 
school-house. 

January 7, 1742. The Vestry agreed that the Church should 
make application to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
in Foreign Parts, to procure a school-master according to the tenor 
of the will of Nathaniel Kay, Esq., and send them home a copy of 
the said will; and likewise what encouragement he may expect for 
said service ; and likewise to request said Society to make some 
addition towards y e support of said school-master. 

Meeting of the Congregation and Vestry, Easter Monday, April 
19, 1742. Mr. Peleg Brown arid Capt. Philip Wilkinson chosen 
Church Wardens. 

All the vestrymen remain as before, and the organist, clerk and 
sexton are continued for the ensuing year upon the same salary. 

April 22, 1742. Ordered: that the money belonging to the poor, 
now in the hands of Capt. George Wanton, he be desired to pay the 
same ; and that it be appropriated towards repairing the dwelling- 
house for the school-master, and bonds to be given to the Church 
Wardens for the payment of the same, with interest. 

[The following is from the Abstracts of the Society for the Pro- 
pagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, 1742-3-4:] 

" By letters from Rhode Island government, we arc informed that 
the Church continues to flourish at Newport, under the care of the 
Rev. Mr. Honyman, and at Narragansett, under the care of the 
Rev. Dr. McSparren, where seventy negroes and Indians attend 
on it in public, whom the Doctor frequently catechises and 
instructs for an hour before divine service begins ; and by him 
the people of Conanicut, mentioned in the abstract of last year, 
return their thanks to the Society for a folio Bible and Common 
Prayer Book for the public, and the pious tracts sent them for 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 77 

their private use ; and propose the building of a church for the 
more decent celebration of divine worship. 

"The Rev. Mr. Honyman, by his letter of June 13, 1743, blesses 
God that his church is in a very flourishing and improving condi- 
tion ; there are in it a very large proportion of white people and an 
hundred negroes, who constantly attend the public worship of God. 
Mr. Honyman hath eighty regular communicants, and he hath bap- 
tised within the preceding two years one hundred and fifteen per- 
sons, of whom twenty were adults and seven were negroes — while 
seventy negroes and Indians, with a large congregation of our own 
people, fill the neighboring church of Narragansett, under the care 
and administration of the Rev. Dr. McSparran." 

Easter Monday, April 4, 1743, Capt. Philip Wilkinson chosen y e 
Elder Church Warden, & Mr. Stephen Ayrault chosen y e Younger 
Church Warden. Mr. John Grelea, Clerk, Thos. Jeffries, Sexton. 

Voted : that the money now resting in the hands of Mr. Peleg 
Brown, 7 " of the rent rec u and what will be due the 25th day of July 
next, on the house where lived Nathaniel Kay, Esq., with the 
money due on a note of hand from Messrs. Joseph Wanton and 
William Mumford, and .£30, due from Edward Perkins, and what 
is due from John Whitehorne and Thos. Vickers, the whole amount- 
ing to ,£239.5, be applied towards discharging the debt contracted 
in repairing the dwelling-house belonging to the school. 

Voted : that a record be made, that the pew No. 10, in the south 
gallery, which formerly belonged to Mr. Joram Place and returned 
to y e Church on the removing of said Place to Bermudas, is now 
given to Mr. John Grelea, in consideration of his good service to 
the Church. 



78 Peleg Brown, son of Capt. John Brown, was born in 1709, and died 
in 1756. His wife was Sarah Freebody, daughter of John and Sarah 
Freebody, to whom he was married February 20, 1745-6. She was born 
in 1721, and died in 1806. 



78 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

May 22, 1743. Walter Chaloner 79 was married to Ann Almy. 

October 10, 1743. Voted: that Mr Cornelius Bennett, the 
present master of the school founded by Nathaniel Kay, Esq., be 
allowed £60 per annum out of the revenue of the estate left for the 
support of s d school, to commence from y e 24th of July last, in con- 
sideration of his schooling ten poor children, and the remainder of 
the income of the said estate be appropriated to the repairing the 
buildings belonging to said estate, until the same be completely 
repaired. 

December 25, 1743. Benj. Wickham was married to Mary 
Gardner. 

January 10, 1744. Voted : that the Church Wardens request the 
several persons indebted to y e Church for the rent of the house and 
land left by Nathaniel Kay, Esq., to pay their respective debts forth- 
with, and acquaint said persons that unless they comply therewith, 
they must expect to be sued. 



VfafrtMJle 



was one of the committee to run 
§ m the lines between Massachusetts 

/pflC/l"^ and Rhode Island. In 1747 he 
was in command of Fort George. 
The commissioners sent to the council called in Boston, in 1756, by Lord 
Loudoun, "were instructed to recommend to his Lordship, Capt. Chaloner, 
who had held a commission in the expedition against Carthagena, as a 
person deserving favor." 

On his tombstone at St. John's, New Brunswick, are these words : 
" Beneath this stone lie interred the bodies of Walter Chaloner, Esquire, 
formerly High Sheriff of Newport, the then British Colony of Rhode 
Island, and afterwards one of His Majesties Justices of the Peace for Kings 
County, in the Province of New Brunswick, who departed this life on the 
16th day of November, 1796. 

"Also of Ann Chaloner, his wife, who died on the 16th day of April, 
1808." 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 79 

Noted : that George Gibbs 80 be invested with the property of one- 
half of the pew he commonly sits in, he paying the Church Wardens 
for the same the price that Capt. Nicholas White gave for the other 
half. 

Easter Monday, March 26, 1744. At a meeting of the Congrega- 
tion of Trinity Church, Mr. Stephen Ayrault was chosen eldest 
Church Warden, and Capt. Thomas Wickham, younger Church 
Warden. 

Voted : that the number of vestrymen for the ensuing year, to 
be chosen, be sixteen. 

Vestrymen : Capt. Win. Coddington, Jahleel Brenton, Esq., Mr. 
Godfrey Malbone, Capt. John Brown, Capt. Philip Wilkinson, Peter 
Bours, Esq., Samuel Wickham, Esq., Capt. Jonathan Thurston, 
Joseph Wanton, Esq., Edward Scott, Esq., Mr. Daniel Ayrault, Jr., 
Mr. William Mumford, Mr. James Honyman, Jr., Mr. Peleg Brown, 
Mr. William Paul, John Gidley, Esq. 

Mr. James Martin chosen Clerk of the Vestry. 81 Mr. James 

yO SJ S^y^-^ was the founder of the house of 

' Gibbs & Channing, one of the most 



tfayy^fc. 




influential commercial houses in 
New England in the closing years of the last century. He was born in 
Newport, and died here October 11, 1803, aged 68 years. His first wife, 
Susannah Scott, daughter of Joseph Scott, died June 24, 1767, in her 22A 
year. His second wife was Mary Channing, daughter of John and Mary 
Channing, and sister of his partner, Walter Channing, to whom he was 
married, November 19, 1768. Their eldest daughter Elizabeth, became 
the wife of Thos. William Moore, at one time British Vice-Consul at New- 
port. Eliza married Luther Bradish, of New York, and in 1814 Ruth 
married her cousin, the Rev. William Ellery Channing, D.D. Sarah, who 
died single at an advanced age, erected in her lifetime St. Mary's Church, 
Portsmouth, and gave at her death, the glebe now improved by the parish. 
William Channing Gibbs, the son, was governor of the State from 1821 to 
1824. 

- 1 The Clerk of the Vestry kept the records of the Church, and served 



8o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

VVady chosen Clerk for the year ensuing, at the same salary that 
Mr. John Grelea had. Mr. Thomas Jeffries chosen sexton for the 
year ensuing. 

April 17, 1744. Voted: that the Church Wardens call upon 
Major Lockman for the rent due from him for the house he lives in 
to the 24th of this instant, and in case he doth not pay that he be 
sued to May Court, and that he give security to pay the rent quar- 
terly as it shall become due, for the future, or be sued out of the 
house. 

April 24, 1744. Voted: that there be a new fence around the 
churchyard ; that Messrs. Thomas Wickham and William Paul go 
about with a subscription to raise money for that purpose, and that 
the Church Wardens employ a proper person to build said fence 
and mend the Church tower. 

Voted : that Henry West and George Owen have a pew built in 
the southeast part of the gallery, they paying for the same .£20. 

Voted : that the Church Wardens let out at interest the sum of 
;£i20, part of the money in the hands of Mr. Stephen Ayrault for 
the use of the poor. 

in that capacity, as did the Wardens and Vestry in their several offices, 
without compensation. The Clerk of the Church ("Clark," as he was 
called) held a more important position than the Clerk of the Vestry, and 
for his services drew a stipend. It was his duty to lead in the responses, 
from the small desk directly in front of and under the reading desk, and 
also to give out the psalms and hymns and to set the tunes. There were 
men at times who filled this office who were not always what they should 
have been, as will be shown further on. The Clerk's desk has remained 
unchanged in form and position since the time when the Church was built. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, 81 



CHAPTER V. 

i745-i75o- 

Easter Monday, April 15, 1745. Messrs. Thomas Wickham and 
William Paul chosen Church Wardens. 

Mr. George Wanton chosen Vestryman in the room of Mr. John 
Gidley, deceased, and Mr. Stephen Ayrault added to the Vestry. 
Mr. James Martin, Clerk of the Vestry. Mr. James Wady chosen 
Clerk for the year ensuing ; salary the same as before. Mr. Thomas 
Jeffries chosen sexton. 

Voted: that the Church Wardens, with Mr. William Mumford, 
be a committee to repair the house belonging to Trinity Church, 
and that Mr. William Mumford be a tenant if said house, as soon 
as it is repaired, at one hundred and thirty pounds per annum, for 
y e house and lot belonging to it. 

February 4, 1746. At a Vestry, held at the house of Mr. Hony- 
man. Voted : that there be allowed to Mr. John Jones the sum of 
£75, old tenor, being the prime cost of the pew 82 that formerly be- 



82 The above pew, as appears by a vote of the Vestry, May 19, 1744, 
was ordered to be sold for the benefit of the Church, the late owner hav- 
ing died, and there being no representative of the family willing to occupy 
it. By the rules of the Church, when the owner of a pew died, and no 
one member of his family came forward and expressed a desire to occupy 
it, it was to be sold and the proceeds were to go into the treasury. The 
order of sale, of Ma)' 14, 1744, was resisted by a brother of the deceased, 
and an attempt was made on the part of the Church to secure legally 
what was believed to be its rights. In this it was stayed by the opinion 
of Hon. Thomas Ward, set forth in the following letter ; hence the action 
of the Vestry on the 4th of February, 1746 : 



82 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

longed to his brother, Mr. W. Jones, deceased, said Jones withdraw- 
ing his action commenced for said pew, at November Court last, 
and giving a discharge in full for said pew. 

February 10. James Martin died, aged 55 years, and was buried 
in the churchyard. 

Easter Monday, March 31, 1746. Capt. William Paul chosen the 



Sir, I will give you my sentiments concerning the case of Jones and 
Almy about a pew in Church as well as my Circumstances & Temper of 
mind will admit. 

i st . Trinity Church, altho' the Parson has rec d Orders from the Bishop 
of London, altho' its Worship be according to the Forms &c. of the es- 
tablished Church in England, and altho' it has Church Wardens, a Vestry, 
&c. cannot in my opinion be looked upon as the Churches in England 
are, for there is no Patron nor Glebe Land, neither has Mr. Honyman 
ever been presented, instituted or inducted according to the Laws of Eng- 
land. And, in fact, this Church was built by private persons by way of 
subscription, as is notorious. So the Property or Fee remains vested in 
the first Proprietors, or their Heirs or Assigns. 

2 d . Mr. William Jones, by the Consent of the Proprietors, shut up the 
north-east Door, put a Window in y e place of the door & erected this 
pew, whereby he became possessed of it in his own Right, & continued 
so till his death, for which you have the Evid ce of Messrs. Bours, Mar- 
tin, Jos. Wanton & Capt. John Brown, who are summon'd. I expect 
they will say on the other side, Jones did not by these Things become 
seized in Fee. I say he did, because by the Articles he had it to him & 
his pew forever. Coke, lib, fo. 1. N. B. There is no occasion to allow 
the Articles are binding, but to insist that from the Tenure of all other 
Pews in Ch'h., Jones had the Fee of the Pew sued for. 

3 d . W m . Jones, by his Will, made present Pl't. his Residuary Devisee 
& Legatee, as you see by the Devise in y c 3 d page of the Will, marked. 

4 th . This proceeding is ungenerous, because y e same W m . Jones gave the 
Ch'h ^150; see y e Article next Preceeding the Devise just referred to. 
And it is likewise repugnant to the Principles of Com'on Justice to take 
away a man's Right who hath committed no crime nor violated any Law. 

5 th . The Articles of the Ch'h are void in themselves, not being signed, 
&c, but had they been signed they would only oblige the Signers, for 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. S3 

Elder Church Warden, and Mr. Walter Chaloner the Younger 
Church Warden. The Vestry remains the same as last year. 

Voted : that Samuel Wickham, Esq., be, and he is hereby ap- 
pointed in behalf of the Church, to settle a dispute between the 
Church and Mr. Cornelius Bennett, the late school-master, and to 
meet with Mr. Peleg Brown, chosen by Mr. Bennett for this pur- 
pose ; and that if Messrs. Wickham and Brown cannot agree, they 
choose a third person, to settle the dispute, and that the parties 
give bonds to abide by the determination of the arbitrators; the 
Church Wardens to give bonds in behalf of the Church, and Joseph 
Wanton, Esq., offering to give bonds in behalf of Mr. Bennett. 

Voted: that Mr. Nathan Coffin, the present school-master, be 
allowed £60 per annum, out of the rent of the estate of the late 
Nathaniel Kay, Esq., and also the rent of the dwelling-house in the 
school-house yard, from his first coming to the school. 

May 19, 1746. Voted: that the note given by Mr. Joseph Wan- 
ton to Capt. John Freebody, for the sum of ^36, in behalf of Mr. 
Edward Pigott, shall be discharged out of the money belonging to 
the poor of the Church. 

Jul}' 14. Voted : that Nath 1 Coffin be paid at the rate of £100 
per annum, for teaching the ten charity boys at his school : the 
same to commence at this time. 

altho' in England the parson has the Freehold of the Church, & he with 
the Vestry have power to elect Church Wardens, &c., yet they have no 
such right in this Country, & consequently their action cannot be binding 
on the whole. 

6. By the 4 tL of the Ch'h Articles we have a Right to the Pew. 

I have not referred you to any Authorities, knowing Jacob's Dictionary 
will be at Hand, and supply you with what is necessary. I am Sir your 
hum. Servant 

Nov. 28 th , 1746. 

For Mr. Robinson. '"/TC&'Gt/Zt/yt 




84 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that the cross alley, from the north to the south door, be 
shut up, and that four pews be built for some gentlemen whose 
families are destitute of pews. 

Voted: that the Minister and Church Wardens forthwith address 
the Society for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts, for a person 
capable of teaching school, and that they send over to them an exact 
state of Mr. Kay's donation, with an account of the annual neat 
produce of the same, and request of them that such school-master be 
Episcopally ordained, and sent to act in the capacity of a catechist, 
and that they would be pleased to settle £20 or £30 sterling, per 
annum on such person; that the yearly income of Mr. Kay's dona- 
tion, with that settlement of theirs may be proper encouragement 
for such a person to reside among us : and that Messrs. Samuel 
Wickham and Peter Bours be a committee to draw up a state of the 
circumstances and annual neat produce of Mr. Kay's donation. 

February 9, 1747. Voted: that Messrs. Samuel Wickham and 
Peter Bours draught a letter to Mr. John Tomlinson, 83 merchant in 

83 The action of the Society is set forth in the following from the 
" Abstract of the Proceeding of the Society :" 

" The Rev' 1 Mr. Honyman, the Society's missionary, and the Church 
Wardens and Vestry of the Church of Newport, in Rhode Island, by 
their letter dated August 2 d , 1746, petition the Society to send them over 
a proper person, Episcopally ordained, to take on him the office of school- 
master, to teach grammar and the mathematics, pursuant to the will of 
the late worthy Mr. Nathaniel Kay, who bequeathed an house and lands 
to the value of about twenty-five pounds sterling per annum, in trust to 
them for that purpose. And that the Society would be graciously pleased 
to appoint such person catechist to their Church, under the direction of 
Mr. Honyman, and to be assistant to him in the care of that very nu- 
merous congregation. To this the Society, out of regard to the advanc- 
ing years of Mr. Honyman (who has been more than forty years their 
faithful and diligent missionary there), have consented; and they have 
given him directions to consult the Rev. Dr. Johnson, of Stratford, and 
to choose out of the young gentlemen educated at New Haven, whom, 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 85 

London, requesting him to use his interest with the Hon ble Society 
for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts to procure a school- 
master Episcopally ordained, with some annual allowance in addi- 
tion to the generous donation of Nath 1 Kay, Esq., deceased, to assist 
the Minister of the Church and keep school. 

March 26, 1747. Walter Cranston was married to Frances 
Ayrault, daughter of Daniel Ayrault. 

April 19, 1747. George Wanton*' was married to Sarah Hazard. 

Easter Monday, April 20, 1747. Capt. Walter Chaloner chosen 
Elder Church Warden and Capt. Evan Malbone chosen the younger 
Church Warden. 

April 20, 1747. John Moldsley [Mawdsley] was married to 
Sarah Clark. 

May 12, 1747. Robert Crooke 84 * was married to Ann Wickham. 

upon their own request, Dr. Johnson hath recommended for employment 
to the Society, a fit person for these offices ; and to send him over 
to England for holy orders, of which, if he shall be found worthy, the 
Society, after his ordination, will appoint him catechist and assistant to 
Mr. Honyman, in the care of his very large and increasing congrega- 
gation, not of whites alone, but of blacks also ; no less than twelve of 
the latter sort having been admitted members of it, by the holy sacrament 
of baptism, within twelve months." 

Mr. Jeremiah Learning was selected as the candidate for holy orders, 
and was sent to London, at the expense of the Church, to be ordained. 

84 George Wanton, born May 10, 1724, was the son of the third George 
Wanton, and Sarah Hazard, his wife, was the daughter of George Hazard. 

Ma Robert Crooke came to Newport from Kingston, N. Y., settled here 
and had an honorable career as a merchant. His son, William Crooke, 
was educated for the bar; but, under the advice of his physician, he found 
more active employment in mercantile pursuits. He built the large 
brick building recently razed on the corner of Thames and Pelham streets. 
From 1797 to 1801 he was the Senior Warden of the Church. July 25, 
1796, he was married, by Rev. William Smith, to Mary Malbone, daugh- 
ter of Francis and Margaret Malbone. She died February 16, 1852, and 
he died in 1832. 



86 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

June 17, 1747. there was a convention of the Episcopal Clergy 
at Trinity Church. The Rev. James McSparran preached the ser- 
mon from Romans I., 16. 85 

August 6, 1747. Rev. Dr. McSparran baptized Mrs. Elizabeth 
Wilkinson, wife of Capt. Philip Wilkinson, in Petaqamscutt Pond: 
Witnesses, the doctor, his wife and Mrs. Jane Coddington. 

August 10, 1747. Voted : that Capt. Walter Chaloner have the 
property of the pew formerly belonging to Capt. Richard Mumford, 
he paying to the Church the sum of £jo, old tenor, for the same, 
and giving up to the heirs of said Mumford all his right to the pew 
formerly belonging to Nath 1 Newdigate, deceased, which right he 
acquired by purchasing said pew of Mr. Newdigate in his lifetime. 

85 Rev. Dr. McSparran's sermon before the convention was printed in 
Newport the same year. In it he thus speaks of St. Paul : 

"Learning was there [Rome] in all the glory and beauty of its fullest 
bloom, which must make every attempt to introduce a new and unadorned 
doctrine the more desperate and romantic among so inquisitive and discern- 
ing a people as the Romans were. In contrast to this, it has been observed 
of one Apostle (and as it should seem) objected to him, that besides his hav- 
ing no grandeur of person, no gracefulness of air or mien to recommend him, 
his speech was also contemptible, rude and unadorned with the rhetorical 
paint, so taking at that time. How then could he expect to make a figure 
at Rome, where poets and orators vied with each other, whose speech 
should the most sparkle with the glistening drops of Grecian dew. 

"Indeed, as to eloquence, he disavows all ambition of aiming at the first, 
and less principal part, consisting in the nice choice and beautiful arrange- 
ment of words, but in that, which lies in a chain of clear and strong rea- 
soning, famous figures, a becoming ardor, and an amazing art of persua- 
sion ; sure, no one ever outshone St. Paul. He surely had a masculine 
and flowing eloquence, a certain majestic simplicity of words, that entered 
the hearts of his hearers, whenever he had a mind to admonish, exhort, 
or warn their passions — doubtless he had divine and useful eloquence that 
enabled him always to speak with an emotion adapted, and in a style 
suitable to his subject. Had there not been a majesty in his speech, whereby 
he spoke greatly of great things, it is not likely the Lystrians would have 
mistaken him for Mercury, the God of Eloquence, or Jove's Interpreter." 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 87 

From the Abstracts of the Proceedings of the Society we gather : 

"The Rev. Mr. Honyman continues his usual diligence in his mis- 
sion at Newport, in Rhode Island — it appearing by his letter of May 
14 th , 1747, that he had baptized eighty-three persons, eleven of whom 
were adults, and properly instructed, sixteen negroes and two 
Indians." 

January 4, 1748. Voted: that Mr. Honyman be desired imme- 
diately to send for Mr. Ogilvie, that he may be sent home to 

y e Society for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts, to receive 
orders as a Catechist, and school-master, to receive the donation of 
Nathaniel Kay, Esq., deceased. 

Voted, also : that the depreciation"" of the money be considered 
with respect to the Rev. Mr. Honyman's salary, and that there be a 
general contribution of the whole congregation on Easter Sunday, 
next, in order that the deficiency may be made good. 

February 24, 1748. Present, the Rev. Dr. McSparran 37 , vice the 
Rector, and the members of the Vestry. 

Voted : that y e encouragement given by Mr. Kay, in his will, with 
y e expectations of an addition from the Society, be represented to 
Mr. Joseph Cleverly, of Braintry ; by the Rev. Mr. Honyman, & 
that he be acquainted that the Church Wardens & Vestry have 
chosen him for a school-master, upon y e foundation of said Mr. 



88 "The committee [appointed by the General Assembly] to whom the 
sale of bills of exchange on England was intrusted, reported, February 
27th, 1748, the sale of ^7800 at an exchange of ^1050, currency, for 
_^ioo sterling, showing the great and rapid depreciation in the paper money 
of the Colony." — Arnold's History of Rhode Island. 

!? Rev. Dr. McSparran was probably here on a visit to Mr. Honyman, 
who had been stricken with paralysis, and whose rapidly failing health 
told that with him the time was near at hand when he must give up his 
charge altogether. 



88 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Kay's will, & that a messenger be sent forthwith, with this advice, 
desiring him to come, & this be done at the cost of the Church. 

April 4, 1748. Mr. Jeremiah Learning having been recommended 
to the Minister, Church Wardens and Vestry, as a suitable person 
to be a school-master and an assistant to the Rev. Mr. Honyman, 
it is therefore unanimously voted that he be accepted and received 
as such, pursuant to the last will and testament of Nathaniel Kay, 
Esq., deceased ; and that he be forthwith sent to London, at the 
expense of the Church, to take Holy Orders, and thereby, on his 
arrival here and entering on his office, be entitled to the profits of 
the donation of the aforesaid Nath 1 Kay, Esq., from this time, and 
the bounty given by the Honorable, the Society for the Propagation 
of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. 88 

And it is agreed between the Minister, Church Wardens and 
Vestry, and the said Mr. Learning, that if he should have an offer 
of settling with any other people after he has entered into Holy 
Orders, that he may judge more advantageous to him than the in- 
come and profits he may make at Newport in his capacity aforesaid, 
that in such case if the gentlemen of this Church will make up to 
him as much yearly as such offer he may have, that he be obliged 
to tarry with them, and discharge the duties of a school-master and 
an assistant as aforesaid ; but if the gentlemen of the Church shall 
not incline to come up to such offer as he may have, yet, neverthe- 
less, he shall be obliged to stay with them and act in his capacity 
aforesaid, till they be furnished with another proper person to supply 
his place ; and also, on leaving them, he shall be obliged to refund 



B The difficulty experienced in securing a competent teacher for the 
school on the Kay foundation seems to have been great from the start, 
and it does not appear that any efforts were wanting on the part of the 
Vestry, for many years after the above date, to carry out the wishes of Mr. 
Kay, as expressed in his will. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 89 

whatever money may be advanced for the defraying his charge- to 
London, to be admitted into Holy Orders, as aforesaid. 

April 10, 1748. Voted: that the Church Wardens go among the 
congregation with a subscription to collect money to purchase a pall 
and two surplices, and for repairing the tower. 

Easter Monday, April 1 1, 174S. Capt. Evan Malbone chosen the 
elder Church Warden, and Capt. Charles Wickham the younger. 
Vestrymen: Messrs. Wm. Coddington, Jahleel Brenton, Godfrey 
Malbone, John Brown, Peter Bours, Samuel Wickham, Jonathan 
Thurston, George Wanton, Joseph Wanton, Edward Scott, James 
Honyman, Jr., Wm. Mumford, Peleg Brown, Wm. Paul, Thomas 
Wickham and Walter Chaloner. 

September 29, 1748. The Rev. Jeremiah Learning, having pro- 
duced his orders as Deacon and Priest, and a letter being produced 
from the Rev. Dr. Bearecroft, Sec'y to the Hon'ble Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, signifying that the said 
Society did approve of the said Mr. Learning for a school-master, 
catechist and assistant to the Rev. Mr. Honyman, this Vestry is fully 
satisfied with the vouchers produced, and does admit and receive the 
said Mr. Learn ing s;i in his capacity aforesaid. 



Rev. Jeremiah Learning, D.D., was born in 
'#Middletown, Ct., in 1719, graduated at Yale 
College in 1745. and was ordained in 1748. He 
resided in Newport eight years. From here he 
removed to Norwalk, Ct., where he remained in charge of the Church in 
that town for twenty-one years. From there he removed to Stratford, 
where he was in charge of the Church in that town for eight or nine 
years. 

August 19, 1750, his daughter, Ann Kay Learning (probably named 
after Ann Kay, maiden sister of Nathaniel Kay), was baptized in the 
Church, and July 22, 1752, his wife, Ann Learning, died in her 22d year, 
and was buried in the churchyard. 

Choice was made of Rev. Dr. Learning as the first American Bishop; 




9 o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Easter Monday, March 27, 1749. Capt. Chas. Wickham was 
chosen the elder Church Warden, and Mr. Walter Cranston, the 
younger. 

No change was made in the Vestry. Mr. John Grelea, appointed 
Clerk, and Thomas Vickars, sexton. 

March 2$, 1749. Voted: that Thomas Wickham and Evan 
Malbone have the Christening Pew, to be divided into two pews, 
they paying what the Minister, Church Wardens and Vestry shall 
think proper, either annually or as their property. 

March 29, 1749. Voted : that a lot of land, formerly belonging 
to Nathaniel Kay, Esq., and by him put under the care of the 
Minister, Church Wardens and Vestry, above named, joining east- 
erly on land belonging to John Gibbs, southerly on a lane, and 
westerly on Thames Street, be divided into equal lots, and let out for 



but enfeebled health, and great bodily infirmity (^hip complaint, the result 
of the severe treatment he received as a Tory, in New York, in the Revolu- 
tion, which left him a cripple) he declined, and choice was made of Rev. S. 
Seabury. He died at New Haven, Sept. 15, 1S04. On his tombstone in 
the old cemetery, in that city, there is this inscription following his name : 

'' Long a faithful minister of the Gospel in the Episcopal Church, well in- 
structed, especially in his holy office, unremitting in his labors, charitably 
patient, and of primitive meekness. His public discourses forcibly incul- 
cated the faith illustrated by his practice. Respected, revered and beloved 
in life, and lamented in death, he departed hence, Se pt . 15, 1804, aged 87." 

The Newport Mercury, in announcing his death, said of him ; 

" He was formerly school-master and Assistant Minister of Trinity 
Church, where he is still recollected with sentiments of affectionate regard 
by many of his pupils, parishioners and others, as the engaging and faithful 
preceptor, the pious and humble Christian, the zealous divine and the ex- 
emplary good man." 

He published a number of works. "Defence of the Episcopal Govern- 
ment of the Church, 1766. A Second Defence, 1770;" " Evidence of 
the Truth of Christianity," 1785; and " Dissertations on Various Sub- 
jects," 1785. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 91 

a fifteen year lease; the westermost to Peter Bours, for twenty-one 
shillings, sterling, per annum ; the next easterly to Mr. Evan Mal- 
bone, at fifteen shillings, sterling, and the other three at the same 
rate, to such persons as the Church Wardens shall agree with. 

Voted: that Mr. William Mumford have the house and lot he 
now hires, at the rate of ,£l6o per annum. 

December 29, [749. The following entry was made in the Records 
of St. Paul's, Narragansett : 

" The bans of marriage between Martin Howard, Jr., 90 and Ann 
Concklin being duly published in Trinity Church, Newport, and 
certificates thereof being under the hand of the Rev. James Hony- 
man, Rector of said Church, said parties were joined together in holy 
matrimony, at the house of Major Ebenezer Brenton, father of >aid 
Ann, by the Rev. James McSparran, D.D., incumbent of St. Paul's, 
in Narragansett, the parish where the parties do now reside." 

Easter Monday, April 16, 1750. At a meeting of the congrega- 
tion, Mr. Walter Cranston was chosen eldest Church Warden, and 
Capt. Robert Shearman the younger Church Warden. 




may have resided temporarily 
in Narragansett at the above 
'# time, but his home was in New- 
port, where he had studied law 
under James Honyman, Jr.. and was then practicing at the Bar. His 
father, who was admitted a freeman in 1726, at Newport, was evidently 
a man of but little prominence. Martin, Jr., is chiefly remembered for 
his connection with the Stamp Act, under which he accepted office with 
Dr. Thorns Moffat, a Scotch physician, and Augustus Johnston, Attorney- 
General of the Colony. It resulted in their being burnt in effigy, in front 
of the Court House, by an ungovernable mob. The following day theii 
houses were rifled and they were forced to seek protection on board the 
Cygnet sloop-of-war, then in the harbor. The next year Howard was made 
Chief-Justice of North Carolina. In 1778 he went to England, and died 
at Chelsea. March 9, 1782. The name of his second wife, Abigail, is 
mentioned in his will. She died in Boston, in 1801. 



92 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

The Vestry continued, except that Jonathan Thurston departed 
this life since our last election, and Capt. Charles Wickham is elected 
in his stead. 

John Grelea appointed Clerk, and Thos. Vickars, Sexton, and his 
salary raised to ,£40 per annum. 

April 17, 1750. The Vestry met according to adjournment. 
Present, the Rev. James Honyman, Jahleel Brenton, Godfrey Malbone, 
Capt. John Brown, Joseph Wanton, Win. Mumford, Peleg Brown, 
Thos. Wickham, Chas. Wickham, Jas. Honyman, Jr., Col. Wm. Cod- 
dington, Geo. Wanton, Walter Chaloner and Wm. Paul. 

Voted: that the Church wardens, with Joseph Wanton, Esq., 
Mr. Walter Chaloner and William Paul, be a committee to procure 
an organist, provided he can be had at or under ,£30 sterling, per 
annum : and that they also be a committee to pay the salary of said 
organist, Joseph Wanton, Esq., promising to pay what cannot be 
collected from the congregation, for said organist's salary. 

April 23, 1750. Voted : that the Church Wardens view the house 
and lot Mr. Mumford now occupies (that was formerly a part of the 
estate of Nathaniel Kay, Esq., deceased) and report to the Vestrv 
what repairs they need, and that they also prepare a lease for five 
years, at ^40 sterling, 91 per annum, for said house and lot : Mr. Wm. 
Mumford agreeing to take one for s d term : said Mumford by said 
lease being obliged to deliver up the said house and lot (at the ex- 
piration of his lease) in as good repair as when he received them. 

July 1 1, 1750. At a meeting of the congregation at the Church, 
voted and agreed: that William Paul should be clerk of the Vestry 
and congregation, to record their votes, give copies of them, and to 
do whatever else of that nature [that shall] be required of him. 



91 This was the last Vestry meeting at which the Rev. Mr. Honyman 
was present. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 93 



CHAPTER VI. 

Voted and unanimously agreed: that the funeral expenses of the 
Reverend James Honvmaiv'", deceased, be defrayed by said congre- 
gation, and the Church Wardens are to collect the money for that 
purpose by subscription. 



thxMa Uvnuman. 



The death 

of Rev. Mr. 

■""■^^Hony m a n 

was a severe 

blow to the Church. The people had been so long guided by him, had 
so long placed their trust in him, that they knew not how to get on with- 
out his guiding hand. He had been sent a missionary to Rhode Island 
in 1704, at a time when the inhabitants were swayed to and fro by all 
manner of doctrines ; the Quakers owned more than half the meeting- 
houses ; the Baptists were divided among themselves, and the friction, 
the outgrowth of varied disquisition, checked the growth of religious belief 
everywhere. But the factions, however quarrelsome among themselves, 
united in opposition to the Church of England, with which they had 
nothing, and could have nothing, in common. To battle with such a 
state of things required tact and great discretion — a patient waiting for 
the growth of the seed he was daily planting was all the worthy mis- 
sionary could hope for. He was never aggressive to a degree that aroused 
opposition : in a simple, quiet way, he taught those who could be brought 
together, to love, respect and venerate the Church: and little by little, 
he made them feel sure of the ground on which they stood. He had a way 
of putting things in a light that commanded attention, and his 121110. 
volume " Faults on all Sides; the Case of Religion Considered ; showing 
the substance of true Godliness, and presented to the Inhabitants (espe- 
cially of Rhode Island) printed at Newport by James Franklin," in 1728, 
is said to have seen three editions. But when, the following year, Bar- 



94 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 

Voted : that the Rev. Jeremiah Learning officiate as Minister of 
Trinity Church, above s d , and that he receive from the Church 
Wardens out of the weekly contributions £4 per week, for officiat- 
ing as minister of said Church, during the time lie performs that 
duty; and when he takes an usher into his service at school, he 



clay's " Apology for the True Christian Divinity, as the same is held forth 
and preached by the People, called in scorn Quakers,'' he simply put in 
circulation the tracts of George Keith and others, and more prayer-books. 

It resulted in men of all beliefs coming to hear him, in Newport, at 
Tiverton, Little Compton, Portsmouth, Narragansett, and frequently at 
Providence. The means of communication were restricted and the mode 
of travelling was fatiguing, but he seems never to have tired ; and not until 
his vigorous constitution began to give way did he relax in the least degree 
his efforts to do his Master's bidding. Dissensions in the Church there 
were none, and when, at the expiration of nearly fifty years in the ministry 
on Rhode Island, he was called home, he saw his congregation in the enjoy- 
ment of a stately and becoming place of worship, their numbers steadily 
growing, and they a happy and united people. 

The remains of Mr. Honyman, with those of his wife and daughter, lie 
buried in the churchyard, just by the Church door. On the tombstone 
there is this fitting tribute to his memory; and in Middletown, just over 
the line, one of the most picturesque hills on the Island bears his name : 

'' Here lies the dust of 
JAMES HONYMAN, 

OF VENERABLE AND EVER WORTHY MEMORY, 

for a faithful minister of near fifty years in the Episcopal Church in this 
town, which, by divine influence on his labors, has flourished and exceed- 
ingly increased. He was of a respectable family in Scotland — an excel- 
lent scholar, a sound divine, and an accomplished gentleman. A strong 
asserter of the doctrine and discipline of the Church of England, and 
yet, with the arm of charity, embraced all sincere followers of Christ. 
Happy in his relative station in life, the duties ol which he sustained and 
discharged in a laudable and exemplary manner. Blessed with an excel- 
lent and vigorous constitution, which he made subservient to the \arious 
duties of a numerous parish, until a paralytic disorder interrupted him in 



VEWPORT, RHODE /SI WD. 95 

shall have as much more from said congregation as (with the above 
'.I per week) will pay said usher's salary, until we are supplied 
with a settled minister for said Church. 

Voted : that application be made t<> the Society tor the Propaga- 
tion of the Gospel in Foreign Parts to send us a minister, and that 
Dr. Samuel Johnson be recommended.' 1 '' 

the pulpit, and in two years, without impairing his understanding, cut 
short the thread of life on July 2 d , 1750." 
The adjoining stone hears this inscription : 

In Memory ok 

MISTRESS ELIZABETH, 

the wife of 

the REVEREND MR. JAMES HONYMAN. 

She departed this life 

February 28 th , 1737, aged 48 years." 

Mr. Honyman's second wife was the widow of Captain John Brown. 
Her maiden name was Elizabeth Cranston, daughter of Governor Samuel 
Cranston. She died January 3, 1756, aged 65 years, and was buried b) 
the bide of her first husband's family. The only evidence that she was 
Mr. Honyman's widow at the time of her death is found on her tombstone, 
for no mention is made of their marriage in the Church records — a sin- 
gular omission. 

The portrait of Mr. Honyman, hanging in the Vestry room of the 
Church, was painted by an artist named Gaines. In i 774 it was engraved 
in mezzotint, one of the earliest specimens of the art in America. The 
portrait was given to the Church by Mrs. Frances Sophia Malbone, widow 
of Francis Malbone, and grand-daughter of Mr. Honyman. 

3 The following fragment of the draft of a letter has been pre- 
served : 

Newport, R. I., Sept. 1750. 
Rev d Sir. 

The Church Wardens and Vestry of Trinity Church, in this Towne, beg 
leave to address the Hon° i; Society for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign 



96 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

A list of the persons who voted that some gentleman might be 
recommended, and of those who voted not to recommend anybody; 
also who they voted who should be recommended after they lost 
their first vote. 

Those who voted to recommend, and who they would recommend : 
Mr. Thomas Wickham, for Mr. Robert Carter. 
" Edward Scott, Dr. Johnson. 
" Chas. Wickham, " Mr. Robert Carter. 
" Robert Shearman, do do 

" Martin Howard, " Dr. Johnson. 
" Thomas F. Taylor, " 



Capt. James Allen, Mr. Robert Carter. 



Parts, and to inform them that it hath pleased the Sovereign Disposer of 
all things to take to himself our late worthy Minister, the Rev. Mr. Hony- 
raan, who, after a life well spent in promoting true religion and virtue 
among us, yielded up [his] soul to God on the second of July last, in full 
hope and expectation of a glorious immortality. 

We have too deep a sense of the great and pious care of the Venerable 
Society in planting and supporting the Church of England in this country, 
not to acknowledge their favors, which, as they ought, so they do, excite 
in us the highest strains of gratitude, and notwithstanding we have enjoyed 
these favors for so long a time, yet we have hope we may be indulged the 
liberty of soliciting the continuation of their benevolence, when it comes 
to be considered that our congregation are really and truly unable to sup- 
port a minister to live in so decent a manner as the dignity of such a station 
requires. 

It is true that we have a considerable number of persons that frequent 
our Church, but there are but few of them whose circumstances will allow 
them to contribute towards the necessary expenses of it. As the town is 
a seaport, and depends entirely on trade, so there are in it a large number 
of widows and orphans, left by seafaring men who have suffered in the late 
war and died abroad ; a great share of which belonged to our Church, and 
are unable to bear any part of the charges. 

We would also beg leave to observe that the greatest part of our present 
congregation came from the various sects of dissenters amongst us, and 
many of 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 97 

Dr. John Brett, for Dr. Johnson. 

Mr. Walter Chaloner, do do 

" Thomas Vernon, do do 

John Chaloner, do do 

George Wanton, do do 

Stephen Ayrault, Peter Bours, Jr. 

William Coddington, Mr. Robert Carter. 

" Charles Bardin, Dr. Johnson. 

" John Thurston, do do 

" John Sowdey (?), " do do 

" Godfrey Malbone, Jr., 



Samuel Wickham, Dr. Johnson. 

" John Archer, " 

James Honyman, Dr. Johnson. 

" Peter Bonis, " do do 

" Thomas Vickars, " do do 

Those gentlemen who voted not to recommend any person to the 
Society to be sent as a missionary, having lost their vote, joined with 
the others in recommending such persons as they thought proper: 
Mr. Thomas Freebodv, for Mr. Robert Carter. 

Samuel Freebody, " do do 

" Joseph Whipple, do do 

Philip Wilkinson, " do do 

Daniel Ayrault, Jr., did not recommend any one. 
Andrew Hunter, for Mr. Robert Carter. 

Peleg Brown, Dr. Johnson. 

" Jeremiah Clarke, do do 

Edward Cole,'" Mr. Robert Carter. 



P ^\ was in command of a company before Louisburg 

^y/ v ~f /? ' n 1 745. ana< > n l 755 he had a company in the 

f J^Cv-^^-^ regiment under Col. Harris, sent against the 

same stronghold. In 175; he held the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel under 



gS ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

" Win, Coddington did not recommend any one. 

" John Tweedy, 9 "' for Mr. Robert Carter. 

" Jahleel Brenton did not recommend any one. 
Capt. John Brown, for Dr. Johnson. 

Mr. Win. Mumford did not recommend any one. 

" John Barzee, for Dr. Johnson. 

"' Walter Cranston did not vote to recommend. 

" William Paul, for Mr. Robert Carter. 

" Henry Willis, " Dr. Johnson. 

" Moses Howard, " do do 

96 For Dr. Johnson, 20 votes. 

97 " Mr. Robert Carter, 13 votes. 
" Mr. Peter Bours, Jr., 1 vote. 

Not voting, 8 

42 



Col. H. Babcock in the expedition against Crown Point, and was subse- 
quently in command of the regiment. He was also present at the taking 
of Havana, in 1762. In the Revolution, Col. Cole took sides with the 
Crown, and raised a company against his country. For this his property 
was confiscated. A tanner by trade, he was born in North Kingston, and 
died at St. John's, New Brunswick, in 1793. 

/^^ ^*^v v was at the head of the house of 
\f^l \ \ John & William Tweedy, of 
^ C^^Q jNewport, the largest importers 

*y*£p~V K^s^tJL^ &&*& S ( ^ drugs in the colonies. They 
^f* ^ had a branch office in New 
C/ York, where dealers could learn 

the prices they had established to the trade. John married Mary Tilling- 
hast July 10, 1732, and his second wife, Freelove S. Crawford, he married 
July 28, 1735- He died in 1782. 

96 Rev. Samuel Johnson was born in Cuildford, Ct., October 14, 1696. 
He graduated at Yale College, and became a Congregational minister ; 
but soon left that denomination, studied for the Episcopal ministry, went 
to England to be ordained, and returned to America in 17-33. He labored 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, yy 

Voted : that the Church Wardens, with Samuel Wickham, Peter 
Bours, Edward Scott and James Honyman, be a committee to write 
to Dr. Samuel Johnson, to acquaint him with the proceedings of this 
meeting, and to request his answer. 

July 30, 1750. At a meeting of the congregation, Voted : that 
the Church Wardens desire of Mr. James Honyman a particular 
account of the expenses of his deceased father's funeral, to be laid 
before the Vestry, or congregation, at their next meeting. 

Voted: that the committee appointed to invite Dr. Samuel Johnson 
to supply the place of the late Reverend Mr. James Honyman, in 
this Church, be also a committee to answer Dr. Johnson's letter and 
to repeal their invitation to him. 98 

A motion for the evening service to begin at three o'clock was 
postponed till we have a settled minister. 

August 26, 1750. Jabez Champlin 99 was married to Hannah 
Gibbs. 

in the Church for thirty years, chiefly at Stratford, Ct., from which place 
he was (ailed to the presidency of King's College in 1754. In 1763 he 
resigned that office and returned to Stratford, where he resided during the 
rest of his days, dying January 6, 1772. 

A warm intimacy sprang up between Dr. Johnson and Dean Berkeley, 
and before the Dean returned to England Dr. Johnson visited him at White- 
hall. 

91 ( >f Rev. Robert Carter but little is known. He must have gone to 
the West Indies soon after the death of Rev. Mr. Honyman, for in 1752 he 
was missionary and school-master at New Providence, where he was spoken 
of as an Englishman. 

* No copies of these letters have been preserved. 

son of the second Chris- 
topher Champlin, was 
'GLuUrf KD' lyt/t/ y^ J born August 31, 1728, 

and was admitted a free- 
man May, 1758. He 
was High Sheriff from 
1775 to 1780, and the duty fell on him, in 1776, to take the Charter of the 




ioo ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

August 27, 1750. The committee who wrote to invite Dr. John- 
son; are now desired to write to the Rev. Mr. John Beach luu to know 
of him if he is willing, on proper encouragement, to remove here to 
be the Pastor of this Church. 

September 17, 1750. Solomon Townsend 1 " 1 was married to 
Rebecca Sturgis. 

January 30, 175 1. Voted : that application for an organist should 
be suspended till we hear from the Society respecting a minister. 

Easter Monday, April 8, 175 1. Capt. Robert Shearman was 
elected the elder Church Warden, and Mr. Jonathan Thurston the 
younger. 

Vestrymen elected : William Coddington, Jahleel Brenton, God- 
frey Malbone, John Brown, Peter Bours, Samuel Wickham, George 
Wanton, Joseph Wanton, Edward Scott, James Honyman, Peleg 
Brown, William Paul, Thomas Wickham, Walter Chaloner, and 
Charles Wickham. 



Colony out of the house of Governor Wanton, who had refused to take the 
oath of office. He was made a prisoner in the war, and was exchanged. 
In 1780 he was appointed Barrack Master. He died in January, 1805. 
Hannah Gibbs was the daughter of George Gibbs. 

10u In 1732 Trinity Church contributed to the fund to send Mr. John 
Beach, a young student of theology, to England, for Holy Orders. He 
returned to America in September of that year, and began his work in the 
ministry at Redding and Newtown, Ct. Rev. Mr. Caner was then at 
Fairfield, the elder Seabury at New London, and Rev. Samuel Johnson 
at Stratford. He died in 1782, after a ministry of sixty years. 

Dr. John Brett wrote of him from Nassau, New Providence, November 
6, 1752 : " The People of our Church at Newport I think will be quite 
happy with the indefatigable laborsof the ever industrious Mr. Beach, and 
he will he somewhat assisted by Mr. Learning, to whom I have again wrote 
a consolatory letter on his great loss." 

Solomon Townsend was a merchant, largely interested in commerce, 
and was associated with John Mawdsley in many ventures on the sea. He 
married Rebecca Sturgis, September 17, 1750, and after her death, 
Frances Brenton became his wife, January 12, 1764. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 101 

John Grelea elected Clerk and Thomas Vickars sexton. 

May 13, 175 1. At a meeting of the congregation Mr. Samuel 
Bours, Peter Bours and Edward Scott were appointed to send to 
y e Rev. Mr. John Beach, a copy of the Society's letter to us, of y' 

of March, 1751, as also a copy of a paragraph of theirs to y 9 

Rev. Jeremiah Learning of the same date, and to acquaint him that 
the congregation still continue their good opinion of him, and desire 
his immediate answer. 

May 22, 175 1. Benjamin Aim)',"'- of John and Anstiss, was mar- 
ried to Sarah Coggeshall by James Searing, P. E 

June 10, 1751. At a meeting of the congregation of (and at) 
Trinity Church, it was voted and agreed : that Samuel Wickham, 
Peter Bours and Edward Scott, be a committee to answer a letter 
from the Society for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts, dated 
5th of March, 175 I, and recommended the Rev. Mr. John Beach: 
and also to send him [Rev. Mr. Beach] a copy of the letter they 
write to the said Society."" 



102 Benjamin Almy was not a man of much force of character, and for 
many years was content to keep a boarding-house, run chiefly by his second 
wife. His first wife, the above Sarah Coggeshall, was the daughter of 
Thomas and Sarah Coggeshall. She died February 22, 1756, and October 
22, 1762, he married Mary Gould, daughter of James Gould and great- 
granddaughter of Governor Walter Clarke. She favored the efforts oi 
the Crown to retain the Colonies, and remained in Newport during its 
occupation by the British. She died March 25, 1808. The journal that 
she kept during the siege of Newport, an interesting document, has been 
published in the Newport Historical Magazine. 

"" " The Society, at the earnest request of the Church at Newport, hath 
< onsented to the removal of the worthy Mr. Beach, their missionary at the 
Church at Newtown, to that numerous congregation ; and they will 
endeavor to provide the Church at Newtown with a worthy suc< essor, as 
soon as they shall be informed of Mr. Beach's removal thence." — Abstracts 
of Proceedings of the Society. 



io2 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

September 26, 1751. Stephen Decatur" 14 (a native of Genoa) was 
married to Priscilla Hill. 

Easter Monday, March 30, 1752. Mr. Jonathan Thurston was 
appointed eldest Church Warden, and Capt. John Jepson, youngest. 

The Vestry remained the same as last year, except that George 
Wanton retired, and Daniel Ayrault, Jr., was elected in his place. 

John Grelea elected Clerk, and Thomas Vickars, sexton. 

April 13, 1752. At a meeting of the Vestry, Rev. Jeremiah 
Learning, 1 "' the Church Wardens and Vestrymen being present, 
voted : that the pews be handsomely numbered with paint on each 
door, and that Mr. Bours' lease be lengthened three years. 

July 20, 1752. Thomas Vernon was chosen Church Warden, in 
place of Capt. John Jepson, who was going to sea. 

July 19, 1752. David Thomas Learning was baptized. The 
sureties were Capt. [John] Brown, Joseph Wanton (Collector) and 
Jerusha Thompson. 

August 27, 1752. At a meeting of the congregation at the 
Church, voted: that Samuel Wickham, Peter Bours and Edward 
Scott, be a committee to advise Mr. Beach that we have received a 
letter from Dr. Bearcroft, by which we learn that he has leave to be 
our minister, and to invite him to come to us." lh 

"" Capt. Stephen Decatur died at Frankfort, Pennsylvania, November 
14, 1808. His son, who became a distinguished officer in the American 
navy, was baptized June 7, 1752. He married a lady named Wheeler, of 
Virginia, celebrated for her beauty, and at the time a reigning belle. 

108 The Rev. Jeremiah Learning, as already shown, by a vote of the 
congregation, July 11, 1750, received a temporary appointment as minis- 
ter, he having previously officiated as Assistant Minister. He was still 
filling the pulpit. 

108 No copies of the correspondence with Rev. Mr. Beach have been 
preserved, and no reason is given in the Church records for his declining 
the call ; but from the Abstracts of the Proceedings of the Society, the \o\- 
lowing particulars have been gathered : 

" The Rev. Mr. Beach, the Society's missionary at Newtown and Read- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 103 

Voted : that Jahleel Brenton, Esq., Capt. John Brown, and Joseph 
Whipple, Esq., be a committee to collect by subscription a sufficient 
sum of money to purchase 'a house and glebe for a minister of the 
Church for the time being, and that they appropriate the same to 
that purpose. 

Voted : that the vestry-room and Church Wardens' pew be con- 
verted into private pews, and that John Whipple, Esq., and Mr. 
John Baninster have the offer of them. Samuel Wickham, Peter 
Bours and James Honyman were to draw up an instrument to regu- 
late the tenure of the pews. 

Voted : that .£40 per annum be allowed the Rev. Mr. John Beach 
as soon as he is settled as our minister.' 

October 2, 1752. Voted : that £\o sterling be added to the £\o 
allowed Mr. Beach at our last meeting. 

December 26, 1752. Voted: that Messrs. Samuel Wickham, 



ing, in Connecticut, having declined, through want of health, to accept 
of the great care of the Church at Newport, in Rhode Island, which, at 
the earnest request of the inhabitants thereof, had been offered to him, 
the Society hath appointed the Rev. Mr. Pollen, M.A., late curate of St. 
Antholins Church, in London, but then curate of the Episcopal Church 
of Glasgow, to that mission, upon his own request ; and it is hoped that 
he is by this time safely arrived, and to good purpose employed in the 
duties of his holy function there." 

This is the first mention of Mr. Pollen in connection with the Church. 

,06a In the diary of Rev. Ezra Stiles, D.D., there is this entry: 

" When, in 1755, I had a formal invitation from the Episcopal Chun h 
in Stratford to conform and succeed Dr. Johnson, with at least ^100 ster- 
ling a year; and before that, in October. 1752, when I sustained a vig- 
orous application to take orders and become a minister in the Epi>( opal 
Church in Newport, then representing a living of £200 a year ; I thank 
God none of these things moved me." 

No mention is made in the records of the Church of the above appli- 
cation, which must have come from individuals, and not from the Corpo- 
ration or Vestry. 



104 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Jahleel Brenton, Edward Scott, James Honyman and Peter Bours, 
Esqrs., be a committee to draw up a letter to the Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 'Parts, and desire them to 
send us a minister, and that they assure the Society we will give 
^50 sterling per annum, exclusive of his improvement of our house 
and glebe. 

Voted : that ^"50 sterling per annum be settled as a salary of a 
minister of this Church, as soon as one shall be appointed by the 
Society, and that it shall commence from the time of his appoint- 
ment. 

Easter Monday, April 23, 1753. Thomas Vernon"' 7 was chosen 
eldest Church Warden, and Edward Cole the youngest. 

Vestrymen: Wm. Coddington, Jahleel Brenton, Godfrey Mal- 
bone, John Brown, Peter Bours, Joseph Wanton, Edward Scott, 
James Honyman, William Mumford, Peleg Brown, William Paul, 
Thos. Wickham, Walter Chaloner, Chas. Wickham and Daniel 
Ayrault. 

107 Thomas Vernon, born May 31, 1718, married, September 9, 1741, 
Jane, daughter of John Brown, merchant, of Newport. She died April 
28, 1765, aged 43 years. He next married, May 20, 1766, Mary Mears, 
who died in August, 1787. He was a merchant of the firm of Grant & 
Vernon ; was royal port-master, at Newport, from 1745 to 1775, registrar 
of the Court of Vice-Admiralty twenty years, and secretary of the Red- 
wood Library. While holding the office of Senior Warden, Dr. John 
P>rett, then at Nassau, New Providence, wrote to him on his appointment : 
" The streams of honor are greatly diffusive and convey their influence to 
the most distant regions ; consequently when I am congratulating you 
upon your late ecclesiastical preferment, I am in some measure partaking 
of the honors thereof. Dignities and distinctions are due to merit, con- 
sequently I must think the second dignity in the Church was not conferred 
on my good friend, Mr. Vernon, had he not been worthy of it. Make 
my congratulations to the Church Warden's lady, who certainly has as 
just title as any one .to partake of the honor." 

Mr. Vernon suffered imprisonment for his principles as a Tory. His 
journal while so confined, now belongs to the Newport Historical Society. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 105 

John Grelea Clerk, and Thos. Vickars Sexton. 

August 15, 1753. Voted: that the application made to Mr. 
Brown, " ls of Portsmouth [New Hampshire], by Jahleel Brenton, Esq., 
Capt. John Brown, Mr. Honyrnan and Peleg Brown be approved 
of, and that those gentlemen be a committee to address him again, 
in answer to his letter ol 10"' of August, instant, and inform him 
that the letters between him and them haw- been laid before the con- 
gregation, and the contents unanimously approved ; and that they 
desire a visit, or, in case he can't come, to beg that he will be more 
explicit in his answer. 

[The following document was evidently prepared at this time. It 
is without date, and is in the handwriting of Daniel Ayrault, Jr. No 
mention is made of it, or of the circumstances connected with it, in 
the Church records :] 

Whereas the Society for the Propagation of the Gospels in For- 
eign Parts, in consideration of the present circumstances of the Con- 
gregation of Trinity Church, in Newport, have thought fit to with- 
draw £20 sterling, per annum, of the salary which they formerly 
allowed to the Minister of the said Church, whereby it has become 
absolutely necessary for the Congregation to augment the allowance 
which they heretofore made for his better support; and whereas it 
is found by experience that the weekly contributions are insufficient 
to answer this purpose, it has been therefore thought necessary, at 
a meeting of said congregation, that the weekly contributions should 
be continued as usual, and that in addition thereto a moderate tax 
should be laid upon the pews in the said Church, in order as well 
to make up the deficiency as to pay the salaries of the other Church 
officers, and other incidental charges. Wherefor we, the present 
owners and possessors of the said pews, duly considering the ne- 
cessity and duty of supporting our Minister in a comfortable and 
decent manner, do freely and voluntarily consent and agree to the 

103 The Mr. Browne above referred to was Rev. Marmaduke Browne, 
son of Arthur Browne, then a missionary at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 

8 



io6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

following taxation, to commence the first da)- of January, Anno 
Domini, 1753, which we do hereby oblige ourselves, our heirs and 
successors to the said pews, to pa)' yearly and every year over and 
above our weekly contributions, for so long a time as the congrega- 
tion shall judge the same to be necessary; and we further consent 
and agree, that in case that we or our successors in the same pews, 
or any of us or them, should hereafter refuse or neglect to pay the 
respective sums at which each pew is rated, for the space of three 
months after the same becomes due, that then it shall be in the 
power of the Church Wardens and Vestry of the said Church, for 
the time being, at their discretion, to place one or more persons in 
the said delinquent's pew, as shall be willing to pay the yearly rent 
it is set at ; and that such person or persons so placed in such pew, 
shall continue therein for so long a time as the said Church Wardens 
and Vestry shall think fit; or, until the owners of the said pews 
shall comply with the covenant and agreement; provided, neverthe- 
less, that no person or persons who shall be placed in any such pews 
for the reason aforesaid, shall be from them displaced in less time 
than one whole year after their entering therein, and that they shall 
not be obliged to pay the rate or tax of such pews for any longer 
time than they continue to have a place in them. 

In testimony of our free consent to the foregoing exaction, and of 
our obligation to comply therewith, we have hereunto subscribed our 
names : 

Henry Bull, Elis. Jepson for J. Jepson, 

John Brown, Content Rogers, 

M. Goulding, Walter Cranston, 

W. Coddington, Godfrey Malbone, 

Jas. Honyman, Daniel Ayrault, 

John Brown, Edward Cole, 

P. Wilkinson, Aug 8 ' Johnston, 109 




Augustus Johnston was born at Aniboy, 



^~7T~Z%-+y ^^^L ^ - -'" a ' l()llt '73°- He showed him- 
£rfwf£& fv/Zs self to be a man of talents, came rapidly 
into notice, and on June 13, 1757, he 
was elected Attorney-General of the Colony ; an office that he held 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 



M. Howard Jr., 
Jos. Wanton, 

D. Coggeshall, 
Jer. Clarke, 
Jahleel Brenton, 
John Whitehorn, 

Wright, 

E. Cole for A. Cole, 
Edw. Scott, 

Peter Bours, 
Samuel Bours, 
Rob 1 Elliot, 
Benj. Wanton, 
Mrs. Munday, 
E. Gidley, 

W m . Gardner Wanton, 
Thos. Wickham, 
Joseph Whipple, 



Jon. Thurston, 

L. Payne, 

Wm. Mumford, 

M. Brett, 

M. Bowler, 

Walter Chaloner, 

W m . Paul, 

John Bourke, 

John and Jos. Thurston, 

Dan 1 Fortaine, 

D. Updike, 

Silas Cooke, 

Samuel W'ickham, 

Isaac Stelle, 

G. Dunbar, 

Thos. Jeffries, 

Rob 1 Shearman. 



In the Gallery. 

M. Phillips and M. Bowler, 11 " Chas. Bardin, 



for nine years. His popularity was so great that the town of Johnston 
was named after him. In 1765 he was appointed Stamp Master by the 
British Government ; an office that brought him into trouble — his house 
was beset, his furniture destroyed, and at the hands of a mob he suffered 
many indignities, even to being burnt in effigy [with others associated 
with him in the Stamp Office] on the Parade. In 1766 he was appointed 
Judge of the Vice-Admiralty Court, in South Carolina, and in Charleston 
he resided a part of each year ; holding in that city a number of offices. 
He died suddenly, at the age of 49 years. 

Metcalf Bowier was for many years one 
J Jy ^0 of the most active and enterprising of 

1 n7^TljL/l* / tne mercnants ot Newport, and, with 
\__S the Malbones, Wantons and others, fitted 
out and kept at sea many privateers in the French and Spanish war, from 
1756 to 1763. He had both his town and his country house; the former 




io8 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



Henry Taggart, 
Jas. Cahome, 
Samuel Ayrault, 
George Gibbs, 
Jas. Hasting, 
Jon a Ingraham, 
John Haxham, 
Rob 1 Dunbar, 
Ann Pye, 
John Archer, 
Chas. A. Wigneron, 
John Briston, 
Henry Allen, 



John Tweedy, 

Robt. Wheatley, 

Nath. Norton, 

Jas. Holmes, 

John Barzee, 

Benj. Jefferson, 

J. Beard and J. Cooper, 

John Launce, 

W. G. Owen, 

Jas. Wilson, 

Job Snell, 

John Vial. 



was what is now known as the Vernon House, on Mary and Clarke streets, 
and the latter was a farm in Portsmouth, where the gardens were filled 
with the choicest fruits and the rarest flowers. But he suffered severely 
under the enforcement of the rule of 1756, and was subjected to vexa- 
tious suits in England, from Dutch and other neutrals whose vessels had 
been taken and condemned for covering property of the enemies. 

Mr. Bowler also took an active part in public life. He was Speaker of 
the House of Representatives from 1767 to 1776. With Henry Ward he 
was appointed a Commissioner to the Congress held in New York, and in 
1765 he was among the foremost who opposed the Stamp Act. On the 
anniversary of the repeal of that Act, 1767, he threw open his house and 
entertained the friends of liberty right royally. In 1768 he was elected 
one of the Assistant Judges of the Superior Court of Judicature, and in 
1776 he was made Chief-Justice of the Court. He also rendered public 
service as one of a committee to obtain the earliest intelligence of the 
acts and measures of the British Parliament that bore on the American 
Colonics, and to maintain a correspondence with the other colonies. But 
the return of peace found him in straitened circumstances; his property 
was depreciated ; he was too old to enter upon his old pursuits again, and 
in 1787 he was keeping a boarding-house, the "Queen's Head," in 
Providence, where he died in 1789. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 109 



CHAPTER VII. 

T 753- T 762. 

August, 20, 1753. Voted: that the Church Wardens be a com- 
mittee to repair the steeple of the Church, roof and gates, and what- 
ever else belonging to the Church that may want it ; and to partition 
off a part of the belfry for a vestry-room. 

Voted: that the half-yearly tax or rent on the pews, now due, 
should be immediately collected by the Church Wardens, and Mr. 
Learnings demand for payment of his usher satisfied out of it. 

August 27, 1753. At a meeting of the congregation, voted : that 
John Grelea, for his ill-behavior in absolutely refusing to sing the 
tune played by the organist in the morning service yesterday, and 
also refusing to read the first line of the Psalm he proposed to be 
sung after he was desired to do so by Mr. Learning, then minister, 
be, and he is hereby dismissed from being Clerk of said Trinity 
Church." 2 

September 17, 1753. Charles Handy" 1 was married to Ann 
Brown. 



111 The above was the outcome of a quarrel between John Grelea, the 
Clerk of the Church, and Capt. Charles Hardin, the organist. Primarily 
the organist was to blame for playing a different tune from the one ;ele< ted 
by the Clerk ; and the Clerk sinned in failing to lead in the singing, and 
then in refusing to go on when so requested by the minister. The matter 
was finally adjusted, as will be seen further on. 

113 Capt. Charles Handy, son of Samuel Handy, was born in Maryland, 
October 8, 1729. Ann Brown, to whom he was married as above, was the 
daughter of Capt. John Brown, an active member of the Church. She 
was born August 19, 1733, and died July 26, 1780. After her death he 



no ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

November 12, 1753. Voted, that Mrs. Hannah Leadbethy should 
take possession of the parsonage-house and dwell there free, provided 
she was warned out and removed within three months of the time 
of her entering into it ; and in case she remains in it three months 
longer, she is to pay a reasonable rent ; Mr. James Honyman engag- 
ing she shall remove immediately when required, and leave the house 
in as good repair as she finds it. 

Voted: that Mr. George Owens be sexton for the remainder of 
the year. 

January 17, 1754. Benjamin Mason 114 , was married to Mary 
Ayrault. 

February II, 1754. Voted: that Richard Beal and Metcalf Bow- 
ler be a committee to collect the remainder of the subscription to 
the parsonage house, in the room of Jahleel Brenton, Esq., and Capt. 
John Brown, who have desired to relinquish that office. 

It was also voted : that Joseph Wanton, Esq., Godfrey Malbone, 
Jr., 115 and Martin Howard, Jr., be a committee to procure an organ- 



married Mrs. Abigail Wilkinson, widow of Philip Wilkinson and daughter 
of Jahleel Brenton. His daughter Ann became the wife of Major Thomas 
Russell, a Revolutionary officer, and his son, Major John Hand v, was also 
an officer in the Revolution. Capt. Charles Handy died July 25, 1793. 

114 Benjamin Mason born in December, 1728, and died January 7, 
1 775, was a merchant extensively engaged in trade in Newport. Mary 
Ayrault, his wife, was the daughter of Daniel Ayrault, Jr., born in r 735 , 
and died March 17, 1792. 

Godfrey Malbone, Jr., was 
// Y. r) the eldest son of Godfrey 

.%,&& &7l4. /y*OVy Malbone. He was educated 
at Queen's College, Oxford, 
and returned to Rhode Isl- 
and in 1 744. In 1 756 he 
commanded a regiment of 400 men, and marched for Albany, but his 
orders were countermanded before he reached that point. After the war 




NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. in 

ist as soon as may be; for the payment of whose salary they are to 
raise money by subscription. 

Easter Monday, 1754. Edward Cole was elected elder Church 
Warden, and Metcalf Bowler, the younger. 

The Vestry remained the same, with the addition of Evan 
Malbone. 

William Allen chosen Clerk, at £60 per annum, and George 
Owen, sexton, at £\o per annum. 

May 13, 1754. The Rev. Mr. Pollen"" having delivered us a 
letter from Dr. Bearcroft, Secretary of the Society for Propagating 
J:he Gospel in Foreign Parts, advising us of his, the Rev. Thomas 
Pollen, being appointed a missionary of our Church, it was voted : 
that it is agreeable to us, and he is received accordingly ; and that 
Edward Scott, Peter Bours, and James Honyman be a committee 
to return our thanks to the Society for their care in sending him. 

Voted : that Edward Cole be a committee to collect what money 
remains unpaid of the subscription for purchasing the parsonage 
house, in place of Richard Beel, who refuses to act. 



he retired to Pomfret, Ct., and resided there. His wife was a sister of 
Francis Brinley. He died without issue, at the age of 60 years, Novem- 
ber 12, 1 785. 

1,6 " Rev. Thomas Pollen. Dr. Berriman, in a letter to Dr. Samuel John- 
son, dated London, February, 1754, says: ' Mr. Pollen is appointed a 
Missionary to Rhode Island. He is a worthy clergyman, and esteemed 
a good scholar. He was cotemporary at Christ Church College, Oxford, 
with your friend Dr. Burton, who is now Vice-Provost of Eton College. 
I would beg leave to recommend him to your favorable notice and that 
you would advise and assist him in any case that may need your helping 
hand. He is a traveller and has seen the world, and has been lately 
employed in an Episcopal Church at Glasgow, but was never in your 
parts ; and being quite a stranger to such a kind of settlement, may 
often have occasion to consult you, who, are so much known and so well 
esteemed by all around you.' " — History of the Narragansett Church. 



ii2 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 

Voted : that ^400, old tenor, be given the Rev. Mr. Pollen, a 
present, for the payment of his passage, &c. 117 

May 27, 1754. Voted: at a meeting of the congregation, that 
the salary we voted to the Rev. Mr. Thomas Pollen, should be paid 
him from Christmas day, last; at fifty [pounds] sterling per annum, 
agreeably to a former vote of y e 26 th December, 1 75 2. 

Voted: that the proceedings of the Church Wardens and Vestry, 
at their last meeting, should be, and are hereby confirmed. 



117 "By a letter of thanks to the Society, from the Church Wardens and 
Vestry of the Church at Newport, in Rhode Island, bearing date the 28th* 
of May, 1754. for the appointment of the Rev. Mr. Pollen to that mis- 
sion [as mentioned in the abstracts of the Society's proceedings in the 
year 1753] it appears that Mr. Pollen arrived safely in the beginning ot 
that month, and was very acceptable to them ; not only for his general 
good character, but also from his good behavior and abilities in his pasto- 
ral duties, as far as they have yet experienced them ; and they made no 
doubt but he would answer the pious and charitable design of the Society 
in sending him to them. And Mr. Pollen, by his letter of June the 7th, 
1 754, gives an account of his kind reception, and that he hath great hopes 
of propagating the true Christian faith, and doing much good among 
them, towards which he promises his best endeavors shall not be wanting." 
— Abstracts from (lie Proceedings of the Society. 

Following his connection with the Church, Rev. Mr. Pollen became 
the Rector of the Church, at Kingston, Jamaica, and under date of March 
12, t 761 , from that place wrote to Dr. John Brett, touching the recent 
death of the king: "Our Church is in mourning, which, I believe, is 
more than you can say of yours. This, if it be true, proves we make a 
greater show of loyalty than you, tho' not of religion ; for I cannot find 
there came to ye Church when it was opened one person extraordinary, 
either to see the new decoration, or hear me, the new preacher. The 
difference between the Kingston and ye Newport churchmen is this: the 
former take care to pay the parson, but do not (are to hear him prea< h ; 
the latter take care to hear the parson preach, but do not care to pay him. 
Whence I may likewise infer that ye former have more honesty, tho' per- 
haps less sanctity than the latter." 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 113 

The Committee appointed to return thanks to the Society, having 
presented the following letter, draughted by them, it is approved of: 

Rev d Sir, Your most agreeable favor of the 10 th of February last, 
we received by the Rev. Mr. Pollen, who, with his family, arrived 
here the beginning of this month. We shall punctually perform our 
engagements made to the Hon hU Society, and do everything in our 
power that may contribute to render his mission agreeable to him. 
From the general good character we have received, and the small 
acquaintance we have had with him since his arrival, we promise 
ourselves great satisfaction and make no doubt but he will be greatly 
instrumental in promoting true religion among us, and therby answer 
the pious and charitable design of the Hon ble Society in sending 
him ; for which favor and all others we entreat them to accept our 
most grateful acknowledgements, and are, with profound respect, 
and with much esteem, Rev d Sir, 

Your Most Obedient Hum We Svt's 

Signed by the Church Wardens. 

September 17, 1754. John Powell 118 was married to Jane Grant. 

November 12, 1754. Francis Brinley was married to Aleph 
Malbone. 

December 3, 1754. Henry Ward was 12 " married to Esther Free- 
bod}-. 

January 6, 1755. Voted : that from the first day of July last, the 



" R John Powell was the son of Adam Powell [one of the Wardens of the 
Church in 1721] and Sarah Bernon, daughter of Gabriel Bernon, his wife. 
Jane Grant, was the daughter of Sueton and Temperance Grant. Mrs. 

Grant died on Long Island, where she went to be inoculated for the small- 
pox, in October. 1774. Mr. Powell removed with his children to Faig- 
land, and died at Ludlow, in 1800, aged 83 years. 

120 Henry Ward was Secretary of the Colony, and then of the State, 
from 1760 to the time of his death, in 1797. Mis brother Thomas had 
filled the same office fourteen years, and another brother, Samuel, was 
Governor of the Colony from 1762 to 1763, and from 1765 to 1767. 



ii 4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

proprietors of the double pews should pay as a tax towards the pay- 
ment of the Rev. Mr. Pollen's salary, per annum, £\% \ the pews 
and a half, .£13.10, and the single pews £g, and the pews in the 
gallery £6. 15, each. 

Voted: that Mr. Pollen should be paid his salary at the rate of 
sixteen hundred pounds, old tenor, for one hundred sterling. 

Easter Monday, March 31, 1755. Metcalf Bowler chosen Elder 
Church Warden, and Robert Jenkins, youngest. 

Philip Wilkinson was added to the Vestry. 

John Grelea was elected Clerk, at .£100, per annum. 

Voted: that hereafter the organist, in divine service, should play 
such tunes only to the psalms proposed to be sung, as the said 
Clerk shall direct. 

George Owen was continued as sexton. 

October 26, 1755. Voted: that the pew No. 27, that was 
formerly Captain W m Bell's, and that which was Capt. W m Gibb's, 
No. 19, should be sold, and that sundry persons applying for pews, 
should draw lots for the pews ; when Mr. Robert Jenkins, in behalf 
of Capt. John Mawdsley, drew No. 27, at £300. Capt. John Dennis 
drew the southernmost half of pew No. 19, that was William Gibbs's, 
at £200, and Capt. Peter Harrison 121 the north part of the said pew, 
at £200, and that the above mentioned pews should be subject to 
the same tax and other charges, as the other pews in the Church. 

October 13 th , 1755. Jonathan Thurston was chosen one of the 
Vestry, in the room of W" Coddington, deceased. 



i2i p e ter Harrison was an accomplished architect — one who left his 
mark in Boston as well as in Newport. He was the architect of the front 
fthe original) part of the Redwood Library, a beautiful and refined speci- 
men of Roman Doric architecture, and also of the City Hall and the 
Jews' Synagogue ; and it is probable that he designed some of the finer 
specimens of domestic architecture, still preserved to us. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 115 

Easter Monday, April 19, 1756. Robert Jenkins was chosen eldest 
Church Warden, and Joseph Wanton, Jr., youngest. 

Vestrymen : Jahleel Rrenton, Joseph Wanton, Godfrey Malbone, 
Edward Scott, John Brown, Peter Bours, James Honyman, Wm. 
Mumford, Jonathan Thurston, William Paul, Thomas Wickham, 
Charles Wickham, Daniel Ayrault, Jr., Evan Malbone, Philip Wil- 
kinson and Walter Cranston. 

John Grelea, Clerk of tin- Church; William Paul, Clerk of the 
Vestry; and Geo. Owen, Sexton. 

J"'y 5) C/56. Voted: that Mr. Proud's allowance, for weekly 
winding up the clock, should he augmented to ,£26 per annum for 
the future. 

October 16, 1756. Mrs. Elizabeth Cole, m widow of Elisha Cole, 
was buried by Rev. Dr. McSparran. 

October [8, 1756. Robert Stoddard 1 -" was married to Mary 
Pease. 



122 The following record was made in the booksof St. Paul's, Narragan- 
sett, by Rev. Dr. McSparran : 

" October 16, 1 756. Being wrote and earnestly entreated to go to New- 
port for that purpose, I preached a funeral sermon for and on account of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Cole, widow and relict of the late Elisha Cole, Esq., who 
died many years ago in London, and buried her in the burying-ground in 
Newport. She was a good woman and a particular friend of the sub- 
scriber's, and she and her husband and family were baptized by me. 

James McSparran." 

Elisha Cole was the son of John Cole, an early settler of Narragansett, 
and grandson of the famous Ann Hutchinson. One of his sons, John, 
became distinguished at the Bar, was made Chief-Justice, and held other 
important offices. Of Col. .Edward Cole, the third son, mention has been 
made in these pages. 

128 Robert Stoddard was a storekeeper in Newport. After the death of 
his first wife he married, November 29, 1767, Catharine Wanton, daugh- 
ter of Joseph Wanton and grand-daughter of Gov. William Wanton. 



n6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Easter Monday, April 1 1, 1757. Joseph Wanton, Jr., elected Eld- 
est Church Warden, and Charles Handy, the youngest. 

No change was made in the Vestry. 

Voted : that for the future the Rev. Mr. Pollen's salary should be 
paid in sterling money. 

April 18, 1757. Voted: that the Rev. Mr. Pollen be allowed 
^200, old tenor. 

May 19. William Redwood 124 was married to Sarah Pope. 

[St. John's Day, June 24, 1756. Services were held in the Church, 
and a sermon was preached before the " Society of Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons " by the Rev. Mr. Pollen.] 

November 21, 1757. Voted: that Joseph Wanton, Thomas Wick- 
ham and Godfrey Malbone be a committee to learn on what terms 
Mr. Knotchell 12fi will act as organist for us, and to get a subscrip- 
tion for the payment of an organist. 

February 13, 1 7 5 S . Voted: that Mr. Joseph Wanton. Jr., and 
Mr. Charles Handy be a committee to write to Mr. Marmaduke 
Browne to know if he will act as Catechist in the Rev. Mr. Learn- 
ing's station. 

Easter Monday, March 27, 1758. Charles Handy was chosen 
eldest Church Warden, and Andrew Hunter, the youngest. 

Joseph Wanton, Jr., was added to the Vestry. 



After the death of Stoddard she married Dr. Destailleur, a surgeon in the 
British army, and removed to Canada. 

124 William Redwood was the fifth child of Abraham Redwood, born 
at Newport, June 1, 1734, removed to Philadelphia, and died at Burling- 
ton, N. J., without issue. January 14, 1 S 1 5, he was buried in the Friends' 
burial ground, Philadelphia. 

126 From the time the organ was set up in the Church there seems to 
have been difficulty in securing the services of an efficient and reliable 
organist, and for many years subsequent to this date the difficulty had 
still to be solved. Knotchell held the office till he died, in 1769. 



X KM PORT. RHODE ISLAND. 117 

John Grelea elected Clerk, and George Owen, sexton. 

Voted : that Peter Bours and Edward Scott be a committee to 
ask of the Society a school-master, to supply the place ot Air. Jere- 
miah Learning. 

Voted: that Joseph Wanton, Jr., Andrew Hunter, and Christo- 
pher Champlin be a committee to have four pews built, agreeably to 
a vote passed in May, 1746, and that Isaac Stelle have the offer of 
one of them. 

April 10, 1758. Voted: that the following gentlemen should 
have the pews, viz.: Thomas Cranston, No. 61 ; Francis Brinley, 
No. 62 ; Simon Pease, 1 - 7 No. 63, and Isaac Stelle, No. 64 ; at the rate 
of ^2CO each, subject to the same tax as the pews adjoining. 

March 29, 1759- Catharine Sorento, an adult Indian, was bap- 
tized. 

April 9, 1759. Voted : that the Church Wardens and their suc- 
cessors, with Capt. Charles Wickham, and Evan Malbone, be a 
committee to repair the house left in trust by Nathaniel Kay, Esq., 
deceased, to the Minister, Church Wardens and Vestry of the above 
Church, and to lease it to Mr. Robert Crooke for five years, at the 
rate of Si 1 I per annum, to be paid quarterly, and that the lessee 
give security for the payment of the rent. The committee also to 
lease the land given with said house, formerly rented to Mr. John 
Bennett, and that they inquire in what repair the fence was when 
Mr. Bennett first hired it, and who was obliged to keep the fence in 
repair. 



127 Simon Pease was strongly conservative and looked well to the public 
interest. In 1750, when the paper money party was in power, and an 
effort was made to create another bank, in face of the ^135,000 ot paper 
money still afloat, he. with seventy-one other persons in Newport, 
signed a protest sent to the king. Bills on London were then selling at 
eleven hundred per cent. 



nS ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that the Church Wardens pay Capt. Charles Bardin 
.£100, the balance of his account. 

Easter Monday, April 16, 1759. Andrew Hunter and Capt. Isaac 
Stelle chosen Church Wardens. The Vestry remained the same, 
and William Paul, John Grelea and George Owen retained their 
offices. 

Voted : that the Church Wardens receive the poor money from 
Mr. John Baninster, or any other person who inclines to pay it in, 
and let it on interest, with good security. 

March 17, 1760. Voted : that the Church Wardens buy, for the 
use of the Church, a broad-cloth pall. 

Easter Monday, April 7, 1760. Isaac Stelle was chosen eldest 
Church Warden, and John Mawdsley the younger. 

The Vestry and other officers remain the same. 

Voted: that Mr. James Honyman and Peter Bours should again 
solicit the Society to send us a school-master. 

May 26, 1760. Rev. Gardiner Thurston 1:is was married to Mrs. 
Martha Sanford. 

August 6, 1760. Voted: at a special meeting of the congrega- 
tion, that as the Rev. Mr. Pollen has now told us that he is deter- 
mined to leave us very soon, Edward Scott, James Honyman and 
Peter Bours, Esq., be a committee to write to y e Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, and request them to 



128 Rev. Gardiner Thurston, bom in Newport, in November, 1721, was 
licensed to preach in 1748, and became the assistant minister of the Second 
Baptist Church. The pastor, Rev. Nicholas Eyres, died February 15. 
1759, and April 29th of that year Mr. Thurston was ordained pastor of 
the Church. He died August 23, 1802. A concourse from this and 
neighboring towns attended his funeral, for he was widely known. The 
funeral discourse was preached by Rev. Stephen Gano, of Providence. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. n 9 

send a missionary, and that they also send over y e proof of our 
having payed Mr. Pollen what we promised. 1 -"' 

Voted: that Mr, Bolus desire of Mr. Pollen a copy of his letter 
respecting the instruction of negro children. 

Easter Monday, March 23, 1761. Capt. John Mawdsley and 
Benj. Mason were elected Church Wardens. 

No change was made in the Vestry, and the clerks were the same. 
Edmund Bell was elected sexton. 

Voted: that the Church Wardens pay Samuel Bours what may- 
be due to him for boarding Rev. Mr. [Marmadukej Browne. 



129 No reason is given in the records for Mr. Pollen's determination to 
break the connection, but the following, from the " Abstracts of the Pro- 
ceedings of the Society," throws light upon the subject : 

•'The Rev. Mr. Pollen, late the Society's missionary to the Church in 
Newport, in Rhode Island, by a letter dated there July the 10th, 1760, 
acquainted the Society that he had received an invitation to a parish in 
Jamaica, and hoped the Societywould not take amiss his acceptance of it, 
as he should always retain the utmost veneration for them ; whether in or 
out of their service, gladly embrace any opportunity of promoting it ; 
that he was pressed immediately to embark for Jamaica, but he would stay 
and officiate in Newport till the beginning of winter. 

" And the Church in Newport entreated the Society by a petition, dated 
September 23, 1760, to grant them another missionary, in the room of 
Mr. Pollen, then about to leave them ; and they take the liberty to men- 
tion Mr. Marmaduke Browne, the Society's itinerant missionary in New 
Hampshire, as a clergyman of very good character, who had lately offi- 
ciated to them to the great satisfaction of the congregation, and they 
hoped to be quite happy under his pastoral < are, would the Society be mi 
good as to appoint him to that mission. This the Society have granted, 
Mr. Marmaduke Browne joining in the request, together with his father, 
the Society's missionary at Portsmouth, New Hampshire." 

The following sermons, preached by Rev. Thomas Pollen, while in 
Newport, were published : 

"A Sermon preached in Trinity Church, Newport, Rhode Island, on 
Thursday, May 29. 1735. Upon occasion of the Embarkation of some of 



,12o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that the Wardens repair the school-house under our care, 
out of the rents of the estate left by Nathaniel Kay, Esq. 

-Jul\- 5, 1761. Voted: that the Church Wardens pay to Mr. 
Browne what is due to him. 

Voted: that Captain Northam have leave to build a pew on the 
north side of the gallery. : 

September 13, 1761. William Hunter 130 was married to Deborah 
Malbone. 



the Colony's Troops, in order to go against the Enemy. Published at the 
Desire of the Council of War, at Newport." 

" Universal Love. A sermon at Newport, R. I., before a Lodge of Free- 
masons, June 24, 1757." 

"May 29, 1755, Upon occasion of the Embarkation of some of the 
Colony's Troops, in order to go against the Enemy. By Thomas Pollen, 
M.A. Published at the Desire of the Council of War at Newport. Text : 
Save now, I beseech thee O Lord. I beseech thee send now Prosperity. 
Psalm cxviii., 25." 

"The Principal Marks of True Patriotism. A Sermon preached in 
Trinity Church, at Newport, in Rhode Island, on the 5th day of March, 
1758. By Thomas Pollen, M.A. And humbly dedicated to His Excel- 
lency, John, Earl of Loudoun." 

Dr. William Hunter, 
was a highly educated 
Scotch physician, who 
came to America in 
1752, and settled in Newport. It is said that he was one of the devoted 
band who adhered to the Stuarts, and that his emigration grew out of his 
participation in the rebellion of 1745. In 1755 he was appointed surgeon 
of the regiment raised in Rhode Island to go against Crown Point, a posi- 
tion for which he was eminently fitted, he having served as surgeon in the 
British army before he came to America. It was in Dr. Hunter's tent that 
the brave Baron Dieskau died. In 1756 Dr. Hunter delivered in Newport 
the first course of anatomical lectures delivered in America. A ticket to 
this course, printed upon the back of a playing-card, is in the possession 
of one of his descendants, Dr. William H. Birckhead. 

Before the Revolution, and up to the time of his death, Dr. Hunter 




NEWPORT, RHODF ISLAND. 121 

September 20, 1761. Peter Hours 1 - 51 died. 

[In October, 176 1, a violent storm did serious injur}' to the Church 
spire. No mention is made of it in the Church records. The fol- 
lowing concise account of the event is from the Newport Mercury 
of October 27, 1761 :] 

" On Friday evening last came on a terrible storm from the north- 
east, which continued increasing, with a heavy rain, and did not 
abate till after two o'clock in the morning. The violence of the wind 
broke off part of the steeple of Trinity Church, just below the 
second ball, which, in its direction towards the southwest, fell upon 
the adjacent house of Mr. John Hadwjn, went through the roof and 
garret floor and broke the summer of the chamber floor, where it 
lodged, but happily for the family (who were greatly surprised by 
the shock) did no other damage." 



espoused the cause of the Crown. He remained in Newport when the 
British took possession of the place, and died in 1778, after a few days' 
illness, of putrid fever, contracted while attending some sick prisoners. 
Mrs. Hunter was the youngest daughter of Godfrey Malbone. Many of 
Dr. Hunter's valuable books were given by his son, the late Hon. William 
Hunter, to Brown University. 

131 Peter Bours, who was at the age of 56 years at the time of his death, 
was an influential man, both in the Church and in the community. He 
had served the town with great fidelity, and when, through failing health, 
he was forced to retire from active life, " The town, from a just sense of 
the advantages of an upright administration, and to express their grati 
tude, unanimously passed a vote that Col. Bennett and Mr. William Cod- 
dington wait upon Peter Bours, Esq., with their compliments, and thank 
him for the singular service he had done the town, and for that interested 
zeal and regard he has discovered on every occasion in the different char- 
acters he had maintained in the General Assembly upwards of twenty 
years, to promote the happiness and welfare of the Colony." — Newport 
Mercury, October 21, 1761. 

Rev. Peter Bours, Rector of St. Michael's, Marblehead, from 1753 to 
1762, was the son of the above Peter Bours. He died February 24, 1762, 
aged 36 years. 

9 



i22 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 

November 2, 1761. Voted: that James Honyman and Edward 
Scott be a committee to acquaint the Society for Promoting the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts, that the Rev. Mr. Pollen has left us, and 
desire they will appoint the Rev. Marmaduke Browne in his stead, 
and that they will also send us a school-master. 

Voted: that Mr. Robert Veates have the use of the school-house 
under our care, and that he have from out of the donation of Na- 
thaniel Kay, Esq., £\o, old tenor, per boy, per annum, for teaching 
ten poor boys ; to begin from this day. 

January II, 1762. Voted: at a meeting of the congregation, that 
a minister should now be chosen ; Edward Scott, Daniel Ayrault, 
Jr., 132 Joseph Wanton and Walter Cranston dissented. Voted : that 
the Rev. Marmaduke Browne should be our minister, and that he 
shall receive from this Church, annually, as his salary, .£100 ster- 
ling, to be paid in payments of ^50 each, at the end of each six 
months ; provided the Society do not continue their mission. 

Voted : that said salary should be raised by a tax on the pews. 

Voted : that Capt. John Mawdsley, Benj. Mason, Andrew Hunter, 
Thomas Cranston and Charles Wickham be a committee to assess 



second son of Daniel 
Ayrault, was born 
at East Greenwich, 
November 2, 1707, 
was sent to Boston, " to learn the art and trade of a merchant," and was 
engaged in business in Newport in 1726. In connection with Philip Wilkin- 
son, he was largely interested in navigation. His first wife was Susannah 
Neargrass, to whom he was married April 17, 1737. His second wife was 
Rebecca Neargrass, widow of Edward Neargrass, to whom he was married 
March 3, 1745. His third wife was Hart Brenton, daughter of Jahleel 
Brenton and Frances his wife. She died January 30, 1764, aged 39 
years. Mr. Ayrault died April 20, 1770. Following in the steps of his 
father, he was active in all works of benevolence, and was a staunch sup- 
porter of the Chun h. 




NEWPORT, RHOPF ISLAND 123 

the pews, for raising .£100 sterling, for payment to the minister, and 
£50 for the other Church officers. 

Voted : that the above-named gentlemen be a 1 ommittee to con- 
sider the making of an addition to our Church, and report t<> us on 
Thursdav next. 



124 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



CHAPTER VIII. 
1762-1771. 

January iS, 1762. At an adjourned meeting, Voted: that the 
Church might be enlarged to the eastward, provided the gentlemen 
hereafter mentioned, give security to the Church, that they will 
make the addition without its being any expense to the other mem- 
bers of the Church, for which they are to have the pews, subject to 
a tax for defraying the expenses of the Church. The undertakers 
are as follows: 

Thomas Cranston, Andrew Hunter, Silas Cooke, Robert Jenkins, 
John Jenkins, Benjamin Mason, Christopher Champlin, Samuel 
Goldthwait, Joseph Wanton, Jr., William Mumford, George Gibbs, 
Robert Stoddard, Francis Malbone, Benj. Wickham, Wm. Richard- 
son, Peter Harrison, Samuel Mumford, Joshua Almy, John Dupee, 
Solomon Townsend, Isaac Lawton, Nicholas Lechmere, 133 Henry 
John Overing, John Magee, Sherman Clarke, Robert Crooke, Samuel 
Johnstone, Matthew Cozzens, George Croswell, Peter Mumford, John 
Miller, Ignatius Battar, Peter Dorden, Nathaniel Bird, John Chalo- 
ner, James Potter, James Drew, James Keith, James Roach, Robert 



m Nicholas Lechmere was appointed Searcher and Land Waiter in New- 
port, by the London Custom House, February, 1 761, and was holding that 
office when the obnoxious persons who were appointed to enforce the 
Stamp Act, were set upon by a mob. With his associates, he was forced 
for the moment to seek shelter on board a sloop-of-war in the harbor. He 
married Elizabeth Gardiner, daughter of William Gardiner, of Narragan- 
sett, and left Newport at the time of the evacuation by the British. 



XKWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 



"5 



Lockwood, James Duncan, William Hunter, John Bannister, Joseph 
Scott, Simon Pease, Jr., and Francis Brinley. 134 

Easter Monday, April 12, 1762. Benjamin Mason was chosen 
elde^ Church Warden, and Samuel Brenton, youngest. Vestrymen : 
Jahleel Brenton, Godfrey Malbone, Joseph Wanton, Edward Scott, 
John Brown, James Honyman, W" Mumford, William Paul, Daniel 
Ayrault, Jr., Evan Malbone, Philip Wilkinson, Walter Cranston, 
Joseph Wanton, Jr., Charles Wickham, and Thomas Cranston. 

William Paul, clerk of the Vestry, John Grelea, clerk, and Rich- 
ard Durfee, sexton. 

Voted : that the Church Wardens, Evan Malbone and Capt. John 
Mawdsley be a committee to repair the steeple by subscription, and 
that they consult a carpenter, and make report at the next meeting 
what the expense will be. 

October II, 1762. At a meeting of the congregation, Voted: 
that Thomas Cranston, Daniel Ayrault, Jr., Samuel Bours and Evan 
Malbone be a committee to examine into the Church's account with 
those persons who have the Church's money in their hands, and 
make report to a future meeting of the congregation. 

Voted: that Mr: Benjamin Mason buy a book proper, in which 
the Church's accounts may be properly kept, and deliver it to Mr. 
Thomas Cranston, of the committee. 

The plot of the Church given on the following page, is from a 
rough draught in the hand-writing of Daniel Ayrault, Jr., after the 
enlargement of the Church, in 1762. The owners and occupants of 
pews are given as follows — the numbers corresponding with those 
on the plot : 



134 The church edifice was cut in two, and the eastern part was moved 
east tu the line of the street ; the intervening space was filled in, making 
two bays in the interior ami affording thirty-six additional pews. The 
points of juncture can easily be discovered by an observing eye. 



126 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



\$62. 



\ 



*7 



'7 



W 



l^ 



*7 



6* >* 



ft 



*f 



ft 



O 7J 



mm 



No. 

1. Mrs. Munday, 

2. Nathaniel Mumford, 

3. Mrs. Chase, 

4. Airs. Gidley, a pew and a 

half, 




No. 

5. Mrs. William Coddington, 

a pew and a halt, 

6. Daniel Updike, 

7. James Honyman, 
3. Mrs. Cowlev, 



NEWPORT, RHODE TSLAND. 



1 27 



g. Captain James, 

10. Mrs. Almy and Mrs. 

Laudy ? 

1 1. Captain Cook, 

lj Captain Joshua Almy, 

13. Dr. William Hunter, 

14. Christopher Champlin, 

15. Peter Mumford, 

[6. Jonathan Nichols, double 

pew, 
17. Captain J. Lawton, 
18 and 52. Minister's Pew, 

double, 
lg. James Miller, 

20. Captain Stoddard, 

21. Captain Charles Wickham, 

22. Captain Simonds, 
2\. Solomon Townsend, 

24 and 46. John and Jonathan 

Thurston, double, 

25 and 45. Jahleel Brenton, 

double, 

26 and 44. Captain George 

Wanton, double, 
2j. Mrs. King, 

28. Mrs. Fortana, 

29. Col. Daniel Updike, 

30. Samuel Brenton, 

31. Capt. Samuel Wickham, 

32. Capt. Godfrey Malbone-. 

33. Colonel Whiting, 



\... 


i v 


34- 


Jabez Champjin, 


35- 


Evan Malbone, 


36. 


Capt. Thomas Wickham, 


17- 


Thomas Cranston, 


38. 


John Collins, 


39- 


Capt. William Paul, 


40. 


John Mawdsle) , 


41. 


lidward Scott, 


42. 


John Bours, 


43- 


Capt. Robert Kliot, 


47- 


PYancis Malbone, 


48. 


Thomas Cranston, 


49. 


Robert Jenkins, 


50. 


Francis Brinley, 


5i- 


Capt. Samuel Sweet, 


53- 


Matthew Cozzens, 


54- 


Benjamin Carr, 


55- 


Andrew Hunter, 


56. 


Col. Joseph Wanton, 


57- 


George Gibbs, 


58. 


Benjamin Wickham, 


59- 


Augustus Johnston, 


62. 


Edward Mumford, 


63. 


Nathaniel Hatch, 


64. 


James Martin. 


65- 


Metcalf Bowler, 


66. 


Walter Chaloner, 


67 


and 73. John, Thomas and 




Samuel Kicebody, 


<V 


Simon Pease, 


69. 


Robert Sherman, 



128 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



No. 

70. John Tweedy, 

71. Mr. Bourke, 

72. Isaac Stelle, 

74. Mrs. Cupitt, 

75. John Forester, 

76. John Jepson, 

77. Capt. Jas. Lillington, 

78. Walter Cranston, 

75 and 61. Godfrey Malbone, 
80 and 60. Daniel Ayrault, 

81. Captain Charles Handy, 

82. Captain John Dennis, 

83. Nicholas Lechmere, 

84. John Overing. 

85. Captain Keith, 

86. Capt. Samuel Johnson, 

87. Capt. Job Snell, 

88. Capt. Robert Oliver, 

89. Henry Bull, 

90. Robert Crooke, 



No. 
91. 
92. 

93- 
94. 

95- 
96. 

97- 
98. 
99. 



100. 



101 



102. 



103. 



Ignatius Battar, 

John Jenkins, 

Sherman Clarke, 

William Mumford, 

Thomas S. Taylor, 

John Brown, 

George Goulding, a pew 

and a half, 
John Brown, a pew and a 

half, 
Philip Wilkinson and Mar- 
tin Howard, a pew 
and a half, 
Joseph Wanton, a pew and 

a half, 
Mr. Coggeshall and Mr. 

Clarke, 
Mr. Brenton and Mr. 

Ayrault, 
Mr. Whitehorne. 



No. 

13. Robert Dunbar, 

14. Henry Nye, 

15. George Owen, 

17. John Archer, 

18. James Wilson, 

19. Charles Anthony Wigne- 

ron isa 

20. Charles Bardin, 



Gallery pews occupied : 

! No. 

21. John Tweed)-, 

22. Robert Wheatley, 

23. Mark Morton, 

24. Ann and John Chaloner, 

25. Jahleel Brenton, 

26. James Holmes, 

28. illegible, 

29. Benjamin Jefferson. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. . _>,, 

[February 27, 1763. Mr. Fayerweather was married to Mrs. 
Abigail Bours, the surviving relict of the late Peter Bours, of Marble- 
head, in the church at Newport by the Rev. Marmaduke Browne, 
and that day (an exceedingly cold day) preached on the occasion 
from these words : Do all to the Glory of God.] 1 ' 

Easter Monday, April 4, 1763. Samuel Brenton was chosen 
eldest Church Warden, and Samuel Bours, the younger. 

The Vestry the same as last year, except that Stephen Ayrault 
takes the place of Walter Cranston. 

William Paul, clerk of the Vestry, John Grelea, clerk at ,£200 
per annum, John Ernest Knotchell, organist, at / 30 sterling, per 
annum, Richard Durfee, sexton. 

The congregation Voted: that Mr. John Ernest Knotchell shall 
have the use of the school-house under our care, and that he shall 



C-lmJfcn^ /o^rt^raru' — yl m ^ 

(J cian Wij 



was the eldest 
of Dr. 
it Feli 

Wigneron 

(sometimes written Vigneron), a native of Province d' Artois, France, 
who came to America in 1690, and died in Newport in 1764, aged 95 
years. Dr. Charles Anthony (Antonio) died in New York, November 
10, 1772. in his 56th year, after being inoculated for the small pox. 
Stephen, the second son, also trained to the medical profession, sailed on 
a cruise, as surgeon, in the war with France, and nothing more was heard 
of the vessel. Dr. Stephen, son of Dr. Charles, born November 25, 1 748, 
practiced medicine in Newport, as the successor of his father, until the 
Island was occupied by the British, when he removed from the town. He 
died on board the hospital ship in New York harbor, August 24, 1781, in 
his 53d year. 

137 The above is from the records of St. Paul's, Narragansett. 

Rev. Samuel Fayerweather was a graduate from Harvard. He was 
settled over the Second Congregational Church in Newport, in 1754, was 
ordained a Presbyter in the Episcopal Church in England, 1756, and 
entered upon his mission at St. Paul's, Narragansett, August 24, 1760. 
He died in 1 781 : and was buried under the communion table of St. Paul's. 



i 3 o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

teach ten boys we shall send him, English, Latin, writing and 
arithmetic, for each of which ten boys he shall have £\Q, old tenor, 
per quarter, paid him out of the rent of the estate of Nathaniel Kay, 
Esq , deceased, left for that purpose. 

Jul)' 25, 1763. Voted by the congregation: that a place for 
another candlestick should be made in the ceiling of the church. 136 

Voted : that the proprietors of those pews next the pulpit, as it 
lately stood, may remove those in the middle alley as far as the 
others, at their expense. 

April 17, 1764. Winthrop Saltonstall 139 was married by Rev. Mr. 
Learning, to Ann Wanton. 

Easter Monday, April 23, 1764. Samuel Bours chosen eldest 
Church Warden, and John Jenkins the younger. 

The Vestry remained the same, except that John Mawdsley took 



188 In the ceiling, before the church was enlarged, there were two rosettes, 
enriched with boldly carved leaves and bunches of grapes. From the centre 
of each there hung a brass chandelier, fitted for candles, and they have 
hung in the same place since the time when they were given to the church, 
in 172c. One of them bears this inscription: 

"Thos. Drew. Oxon. 1728." 

When the church was lengthened, it was found necessary to increase 
the artificial light for evening service ; hence the above vote. Subse- 
quently, and within the memory of the generation that is now nearly- 
closed, it was found expedient to carry a smoke-pipe in winter, up through 
the ceiling and enter a chimney built there at the time. This pipe was 
made to pass through the centre of the rosette that had been put up in 
1762. The putting in of a furnace did away with the stove-pipe, but the 
rosette was never restored. All traces of the brass chandelier that once 
hung there have been lost. 

m Winthrop Saltonstall was the son of Gov. Gurdon Saltonstall, of New 
London, and was the cousin of his wife, Ann Wanton, daughter and fourth 
child of Gov. Joseph Wanton, of Newport. 



NEWPORT, RHODE TSLAND. 131 

the place of Capt. John Brown. 14 " The other officers were re- 
tained. 

June 9, 17(14. The Vestry voted t<> write to the Society, desiring 
them to send out a school-master. 

September [6, [764. George Scott 14 ' was married to Mary 
Ayrault. 

October 2S, 1 764. Major Fairchild 142 was married to Catharine 
Malbone. 

December [6, [764. John Bell 14 '' was married to Mary lleatly. 

[February 17, 1765. Rev. Mr. Fayerweather preached at New- 
port, and baptized three children, one of Governor Wanton; all with 
their proper sponsors.] 141 

Easter Monday, April 15, 1765. Joseph Jenkins was chosen 
eldest Church Warden, and John Bours the younger. 



/S son of 



son of Capt. John Brown, 
active member of the 
had died January 2, 
1764. He was a merchant 
engaged in commercial pur- 
suits, and with Godfrey Malbone and George Wanton fitted out privateers 
in the second Spanish war. December 26, 1717, he was married bj Rev. 
Mr. Honyman to Jane Lucas, born in 1769, and daughter of Augustus 
Lucas. She died at Newport, October 13, 1775. 

141 George Scott followed the seas, and after his death \V\> widow mar- 
ried Jahleel Brenton. Mary Ayrault. his wife, was the daughter of Stephen 
Ayrault. She was born in 1742, and died March 13, 1816. 

142 "Major" was Fairchild's Christian name, and not a title. Catha- 
rine Malbone, his wife, born October 21, 1 737, was a daughter of Godfrey 
Malbone. 

The Major Fairchild, who married Bathsheba Palmer. March 12, 1729, 
was probably the father of the above. 

" John Bell was a Major in the British army. He went to Fngland 
with his family, and died at Islington, County of Middlesex, May, 1779. 
Mrs. Bell, whose maiden name was Mary Grant, daughter of Sueton Grant, 
was the widow of Andrew Heath. She died in England in 1781. 

144 History oj the Narragansett Church. 



132 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

The Vestry and other officers were continued. The sexton's 
salary was raised to ,£140 per annum. 

January 8, 1765. Henry Marchant 145 was married to Rebecca 
Cooke. 

Easter Monday, April 15, 1765. Joseph Jenkins was chosen 
eldest Church Warden, and John Bours the younger. 

The Vestry and other officers were continued. The sexton's 
salary was raised to .£140 per annum. 

Voted : that the Church Wardens hire a room for Markadore, for- 
merly a slave of Nathaniel Kay, Esq., deceased, set him free and pay 
his rent for one year. 

Voted : that James Honyman, Esq., be desired to inquire of the 
Town Council respecting the affair of John Barzee. 140 

[The following, from the " Abstracts of the Proceedings of the 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts," should 
have a place here :] 

" The Rev. Marmaduke Browne, the Society's missionary at New- 
port, in the Colony of Rhode Island, in his letter dated February 



Uo Henry Marchant was born at Martha's Vineyard in 1 741, and died at 
Newport, August 30, 1796. He became eminent at the Bar. After quali- 
fying himself in the law office of Judge Trowbridge, at Cambridge, he 
commenced the practice of the law in Newport. In 1770 he was elected 
Attorney-General of the Colony, which office he held till 1777, when he 
was chosen a delegate to the Continental Congress. In the interval he 
had been sent, 1771, to England to adjust claims against the British gov- 
ernment. When the war broke out he retired to Narragansett, but in 
1784 he returned to Newport, was sent to the General Assembly as a Rep- 
resentative, and was a member of the Convention that adopted the Federal 
Constitution. Following the adoption of the Constitution, he was ap- 
pointed District Judge, which office he filled up to the time of his death. 
He was highly esteemed. 

140 There is no reference to the affairs of John Barzee in the records of 
the Town Council of that date. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, 133 

29, T764, writes, that notwithstanding the great enlargement of 
Trinity Church, there is still room wanting to accommodate all who 
would willingly attend. In this Colony, he observes, a good har- 
mony subsists between Churchmen and dissenters. The Quakers, 
in particular, express their regard for the Church from the experi- 
ence they have had of the mildness and lenity of its administration. 
And his parishioners are constant and decent in their attendance on 
public worship, and unblamable in their lives. In his letter, dab d 
September 19th, Mr. Browne gives a particular account of the rents 
of the lands and houses left by Mr. Kay for the use of a grammar- 
master at Newport, which, from the 1st of April, 1765, will amount 
to the sum of £64. $s sterling, from which deducting i~io to keep 
the house in repair, the estate will produce near £54 sterling per 
annum. The Society are desired to recommend a grammar-master 
for this school, as soon as a proper person can be procured. Mr. 
Browne has baptized in the preceding year forty-five infants, two 
white and one black adult, and has from 112 to 120 communi- 
cants." 

Easter Monday, March 31, [766. John Bours was chosen eldest 
Church Warden, and Simon Pease the younger. 

The Vestry and other officers continue the same as last year. 

July 31, 1766. Voted: that the house rented to Mr. Robert 
Crooke be immediately repaired, under the inspection of the Church 
Wardens; the gentlemen appointed having reported that .£500, O. T. 
will put it into tenantable repair ; but if more be needed, the Wardens 
are not limited. 

January 4, 1767. Dr. John Halliburton 147 was married to Susannah 
Brenton. 



•^ I fi d/ /f/? / k-/ & * )r ' Halliburton was emi- 

yJ K ■ Jj ' CWMiAruJUJHs^ry^ nent as a physi< ian, and 

socially his standing was equally high. When the Revolution broke out 
his leaning was to the Crown. He was suspected of holding treasonable 
correspondence with the enemy, escaped to New York, and from there 



i 3 4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Easter Monday, April 20, 1767. Simon Pease, Jr. and Christo- 
pher Champlin' 4 * were chosen Church Wardens. 

Vestrymen : Godfrey Malbone, Joseph Wanton, Edward Scott, 
James Honyman, Wm. Mumford, William Paul, Thos. Wickham, 
Evan Malbone, Philip Wilkinson, Joseph Wanton, Jr., Charles Wick- 
ham, Thomas Cranston, Stephen Ayrault, John Mawdsley, Jahleel 
Brenton and Andrew Hunter. 

William Paul, Clerk of the Vestry, John Grelea, Clerk of the 
Church, Richard Durfee sexton during his good behavior. 

Voted : that ^4000, old tenor, should be raised by a tax on the 
pews, for repairing the steeple, and that the Church Wardens, with 



I5I<">. 

y* fourth of th 
// • ^y 6^ was born at 

£fiSKS C^T^^ 2 /^^^ town R J ' 



removed to Nova Scotia, where he died in 1807. His wife died there 
in 181S. 

fourth of the name, 
at Charles- 
February 
X 7, 1 731, and died in 

ir* f?" y Newport, April 25, 

1805. He took up his 
residence in Newport prior to 1753, for at that time he was a member of the 
Artillery Company. He joined the expedition against Crown Point, and 
was commissioned, May 10, 1755, a Major in the regiment raised by Col. 
Harris. The following year he was made Lt. Colonel. On his return to 
Newport he entered into business, chiefly commercial, and with other 
leading men, had much to do with fitting out privateers. 

In 1763 a number of British men-of-war under Lord Colville, Rear 
Admiral of the White, were stationed at Newport, to enforce the revenue 
laws. For several years there was seldom a day when there was not one 
or more such vessels in the harbor. The Victualling Agent of the Navy 
was Sir Alexander Grant, in London, who had his agents in America, 
Mr. Champlin was his Newport agent ; but when the war came on he 
removed to Narragansett till the return of peace. After the war he again 
took up his residence in Newport. He was elected an Alderman when 
the city government was organized, in 1784, and had other appointments 
of trust. 



NEWPORT, RHOPR ISLAND. 

John Mawdsley, be a committer to tax the pews for raising the 
aforesaid sum, and t hat Evan Malbone, Capt. John Mawdsley and 
Andrew Hunter be a committee to hire and agree with proper per- 
sons for finishing s' 1 work, and to oversee and inspect the same till 
it is finished. 

Voted : that the gallery pews be taxed twelve shillings per annum. 

[At the June session of the General Assembly, [767, a lottery was 
granted, to raise twenty-five hundred dollars for putting a new 
steeple upon Trinity Church, the old one being much decayed.] 148 

November 16, 1767. Voted: that the Church Wardens should 
hire the sum of £$0 sterling, at lawful interest, to pay the Rev. Mr. 
Risset's passage, and his salary to the First of September last ; for 
the payment of which, principal and interest, the Vestrymen them- 
selves are bound. 

December 3, 1767. Whereas the Church Wardens have reported 
to the Vestry, that they are not able to hire the money for the pur- 
pose of the aforesaid vote of the 16 th of November, unless they give 
8 per cent, interest for it, whereupon it was voted that the Church 
Wardens hire said money at said last mentioned rate, and the Vestry 
oblige themselves to see the same repaid. 

Easter Monday, April 4, 1768. Francis Brinley and Francis 
Malbone chosen Church Wardens. 

Vestrymen: Joseph Wanton, Edward Scott, James Honyman, 

W ,n Mumford, Thomas Wickham, Evan Malbone, Philip Wilkinson, 

Joseph Wanton, Jr., Charles Wickham, Thomas Cranston, Stephen 

Vyrault, John Mawdsley, Jahleel Brenton, Andrew Hunter, Simon 

Pease, Jr., and John Bours. 

The other officers were continued. 

April 7, 176S. Voted: that the old tower of the Church, which 



Arnold's History of Rhode Island. 



r 3 6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

is reported by a survey of carpenters to be very defective, be pulled 
down, and a new one, of wood, be erected in its place. 

April to, 1768. At a meeting of the congregation, Voted : that 
Capt. Evan Malbone, Capt. Charles Wickham, and Mr. John Bours, 
be a committee to agree with Messrs. Charles Spooner, Jethro 
Spooner, and James Tew, Jr., to pull down the old tower, and 
build a new one, of wood, eighteen feet square, and sixty feet high, 
and make a report to the congregation on Wednesday next. 

April 13, 1768. Messrs. Evan Malbone, Charles Wickham, and 
John Bours, made report to the congregation, met by adjournment, 
that they had covenanted with Charles Spooner, Jethro Spooner, 
and James Tew, Jr., to pull down the old tower, and build a new 
one, of wood, upon the following terms, viz. : That the said Charles 
Spooner, Jethro Spooner, and James Tew, Jr., will engage to pull 
down the old tower and build a new one, of wood, eighteen feet 
square, and sixty feet high, they finding all and every the materials 
necessary for completing the said tower, excepting what mason's 
work may be wanting, the lead and leading, glass, and rigging 
wanted at raising, together with the heavy iron work ; the Church 
paying them for the same the sum of .£9000, old tenor, or eleven 
hundred and twenty-five Spanish milled dollars ; they to have the 
old tower for their trouble in pulling it down, and some new timber 
belonging to the Church. 

Voted : that the report made by Evan Malbone, Charles Wick- 
ham, and John Bours be accepted, and that the said three persons, 
with Mr. Stephen Ayrault, George Gibbs, and Archimedes George, 
be a committee to oversee the said works, and enter into articles of 
agreement with the said persons for carrying out the same imme- 
diately. 

June 7, 1768. Voted : that the Church Wardens hire the sum of 
,£100 to pay the Rev. Mr. Bisset what salary may be due him, and 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 137 

that they be empowered to give 8 pel - tit. interest, per annum, for 
the same, provided it cannot be obtained at a lower interest. 

Voted : that the persons indebted to the estate of Mr. Kay, for 
rents, be immediately sued for the same by the Church Wardens. 

September 1.9, [768. Edward Wanton 150 was married to Frances 
Ayrault. 

January 9, 1769. Voted: that Mr. Francis Malbone and Mr. 
Simon Pease, jr., be a committee to hire a sum of money sufficient 
to pay the balance due from the Church to the carpenters for build- 
ing the steeple, &c, and some other debts due from said Church, and 
that the Vestry and congregation give to them a counter security for 
the payment of the said money. 

Voted: that Thomas Cranston, Esq., John Mawdsley, Esq., and 
Mr. Evan Malbone be a committee to go to Providence, to attend 
the General Assembly, to sit there the 27th inst, and endeavor to 
obtain the granting of a petition for incorporating the Church, and 
the said gentlemen were requested to attend the same. 

February 26, 1769. In consequence of the vote of the Church 
Wardens and Vestry, on the inst. [ult.] to hire a sum of money suf- 
ficient to pay the carpenters the balance due to them for building 
the steeple, &c, SIOOO were hired of Capt. Charles Handy for the 
term of one year, at the rate of 8 per cent, interest per annum, and 
$500 of John Tillinghast, Esq., at the rate of 6 per cent, per annum, 
for the same time. 

Easter Monday, March 27, 1769. Mr. Francis Malbone and Mr. 
Peter Cooke were chosen Church Wardens. 

Francis Brinley chosen one of the Vestry in the room of Edward 



150 Edward Wanton was one of the three sons of Gov. Gideon Wanton ; 
and Frances Ayrault, his wife, was the daughter of Stephen Ayrault. After 
the death of Wanton she married John Piper, of the Parish of Colyton, 
County of Devon, England, and with him resided there. 

in 



13S ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Scott, deceased ; John Bours, Clerk of the Vestry ; John Grelea, 
Clerk of the Church; John E. Knotchell, organist; and Richard 
Durfee, sexton, on good behavior. 

Voted : that the sexton's salary be augmented to ^20 per annum, 
and that he employ some person to ring the bell on Sundays, 
which shall be done for the future from the second story of the 
belfry. 

April 3, 1769. Meeting of the congregation. Voted: that James 
Honyman, Evan Malbone, Charles Wickham, Stephen Ayrault and 
John Bours be a committee to draw up a set of rules and regula- 
tions for the Church, agreeably to the charter 1 ' 1 lately granted by the 
Colon}-. 

Voted: that the Clerk's salary be raised to ,£30 per annum. 

May 29, 1769. The congregation voted : that a tax of $800 be 
assessed on the pews, towards paying the money lately hired by the 
Church, of Job Tillinghast and Charles Handy, for paying the debts 
of the Church, owed for building the steeple, &c, that the pews be 
rated equally, according to their bigness ; that the gallery pews be 
rated one-third of the pews below, and that the Church Wardens 
collect the same. 

The Rev. Mr. Browne having informed the congregation, that he 
is under necessity to go to Europe, and that he has obtained leave 
of absence from the Society for that purpose ; voted : that he have 
liberty- from the congregation also, and that his salary go on during 
his absence. 

June 1 2, 1769. At a meeting of the congregation, voted: that 
the Rev. Mr. Browne, and John Mawdsley. Esq., be requested to 
procure in London, a new stop for the organ, in the room of that 
which is wanting ; either the voi humane, or any other stop that 



1S1 This was the first charter granted to any religious society in Rhode 
Island. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 139 

may be thought most suitable, and that the congregation will pay 
th( < xpense of the same. 152 

October 9, 1769. Voted: by the congregation, that the salary of 
Mr. Knotchell, organist of the Church, lately deceased, be continued 
and paid to his widow until the first day of January next ensue 
and that the widow and family of the said Mr. Knotchell live in the 
house in the school-house yard, belonging to the Church, until 
Raster next, rent free. 

Henry Hull, Esq., came into Church and agreed that the pew 
belonging to him, should be disposed of to ('apt. Samuel Wickham, 

m The following imperfect draught of a letter, found in a package of 
old papers, without signature, will throw light on the subject. From it 
we also gather the name of the builder of the organ : 

•'Newport. Rhode Island, October, 1755. 
' Mr. Richard bridge. 

In the year 1733 you made an organ for the Rev. Doctor Berkeley, 
late Bishop of Cloyne, in which were the following whole stops (which 
he presented to Trinity Church.) 

Stop Diapason, Principal Flute, 15"' & Human Voice. 
y 2 stops ; Comet. \ 
Trumpet. Treble. 

( >pen Diapason. ) 
Echo Trumpet, stop Diapason. Open Diapason— all half stops. 
"We have sent abox to the care of Mr. Rii hard Mollineau, Iron Monger, 
in London, all the box H. pipes, which were never of any use here, as no 
organist could ever make some of them speak, and others when tuned 
would not stand half an hour. Now, Sir, what we desire is, that if you 
i an 50 alter them as to make them answer their design, pray do: if not. 
we are of opinion that if we had a trumpet bass and the treble vox humane, 
it would be a good addition to the loudness of our organ. We waited so 
long in hopes an organ maker might accidentally come here, but as there is 
no one expected now, we hope for the credit of your organ, you'll repair 

this to your satisfaction, as well as to that of, Sir, 

" p. S. — If neither of those ways above mentioned < an be made use of, 
if von think proper, make a 12th in lieu thereof, and Mr. R. M. will pay 
you." 



140 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

for Si 20, out of which sum the money due on said pew to the 
Church should belong ; reserving a seat for himself in said pew 
during his life. 

October 16, 1769. Voted: by the congregation, that the tax of 
twenty-three shillings, sterling, on the pews in the lower part of the 
church, and twenty shillings sterling on the pews in the gallery, be 
continued for the present tax, in order to defray the incidental 
charges of the Church. 

Voted : that Capt. Charles Bardin officiate as organist of the 
Church until Easter next, and that he be paid at the rate of £$2 per 
annum. 

f" Yesterday, in the afternoon, we hear there was a very handsome 
collection at the Church of England in this Town, for the relief of 
Mr. Thomas Allen, of Providence, in this Colony, a very poor man, 
whose circumstances are really deplorable ; having a wife, who, by 
much sickness, has been a long time blind, and 1 1 children, 7 of 
whom were born blind." — Newport Mercury, January 20, 1770.] 

February 26, 1 770. At a meeting of the congregation, a letter 
from the Rev. Mr. Bisset to the Church Wardens, acquainting them 
•that he had received an invitation to settle in Boston, as an assistant 
to Dr. Caner, at the Chapel there, and informing them that unless 
the Church would give him an additional salary of $100 per annum, 
and repair the house annexed to the school-house, in a decent man- 
ner, immediately, so that he might live in it, he should leave them ; 
was laid before the meeting. Whereupon a vote was put, whether 
the Church would comply with Mr. Bisset's proposal, which was 
passed in the negative. 

Voted : that Joseph Wanton, Esq., and Mr. John Hours be a com- 
mittee to write to the Rev. Arthur Browne, at Portsmouth [N. H.], 
and inform him that the Rev. Mr. Bisset is about leaving the Church 
and school, and request his assistance in supplying the Church with 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. [41 

a minister, until the return of his son, the Rev. Marmaduke Browne, 
either by coming up to Newport himself, or sending up the Rev. Mr. 

Badger. 

Voted : that the above gentlemen be also requested to write to the 
Rev. Dr. Miles Cooper, of King's College, in New York, and to the 
Rev. Dr. Smith, Provost of the Academy at Philadelphia, and enclose 
a paragraph of Mr. Kay's will respecting a school-master and 
assistant, and request those gentlemen to make inquiry for a suit- 
able young man to go to England for orders, to supply Mr. Bisset's 
place. 

March 8, I//O. Abraham Redwood, Jr., 153 was married to 
Susannah Honyman. 

Easter Monday, April 23, 1770. Mr. Peter Cooke and Mr. 
Thomas Wickham, Jr., chosen Church Wardens. John Grelea, 
Clerk; Charles Bardin, Organist; and Richard Durfee, Sexton, 
during his good behavior. 

Voted : that the Church Wardens be requested to sue imme- 
diately all persons who are delinquent in paying the pew tax, and 
money due to the Church by subscription. 

Voted : that the house in the school-house yard be put in tenant- 
able repairs, and delivered to the Rev. Mr. Bisset for his use, and 
that he keep the same in repair. 

April 30, 1770. Mr. Thomas Wickham, Jr., having refused to 
accept of the office of Church Warden, Mr. John Bours was unani- 
mously requested by the congregation to accept of the office of 
Senior Warden, which, to oblige the Church, he agreed to; Air. 
Peter Cooke agreeing to act as Junior Warden under him for the 
year ensuing. 

153 Abraham Redwood, Jr.. was the eldest son of Abraham Redwood, the 
founder of the Redwood Library ; born January 8, 1 728, and died in 1 788. 
Susannah Honyman was the daughter of James Honyman, and grand- 
daughter of Rev. James Honyman. 



1 42 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that the Wardens pay to the Rev. Mr. Bisset £8 sterling 
per annum for the hire of the house in the school-house yard, which, 
it is the opinion of the congregation, he is entitled to, and that the 
Church Wardens warn Mrs. Knotchell to leave the same imme- 
diately, and that they hire it out on the best terms they can. 

Voted: that the Rev. Mr. Bisset's 154 demand of £& per annum 
sterling, for the hire of the house in the school-house yard, for two 
and a half years past, be deferred to the consideration of the con- 
gregation at the next meeting. 

June 25, 1770. At a meeting of the Church Wardens and Vestry, 
specially called. Present, James Honyman, Esq., Thomas Cran- 
ston, Esq., Mr. Charles Wickham, Col. Joseph Wanton, Mr. Stephen 
Ayrault, Mr. William Mumford, Mr. Frank Brinley, Mr. Thomas 
Wickham, Mr. Philip Wilkinson, Mr. Evan Malbone, John Mawds- 
ley, Esq., and John Hours and Peter Cooke, Wardens. 

Voted : that the house belonging to the Church, part of the estate 
of Nath 1 Kay, 155 Esq., be disposed of for $3000, and the first offer be 
given to Mr. Brinley. 

July 9, 1770. The congregation voted: that Dr. Edward 
Evans 156 be chosen organist of the Church, at the annual salary of 
.£30, sterling, to commence on his return from England to Newport, 



m Rev. Mr. Bisset was a bachelor, and not wanting a house, the one in 
the school-house yard, the use of which he was entitled to as school-master, 
was rented for his benefit ; but he claimed that he should receive a rental for 
it from the time that he entered upon his duties. Mrs. Knotchell, widow of 
the organist, had been living in it rent free. How his claim was met by the 
< ongregation does not appear. 

' "' This was the Kay house. The ground for this action is only con- 
jectural — that the expense of keeping it in repair, and the difficulty ex 
perienced at times in finding a good tenant, led to the- wish to convert it 
into money, which could be put out to interest. Later, as will be seen, 
the Vestry thought better of this. 

156 Dr. Edward Evans never returned from England. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 143 

and that he be requested to purchase in London the vox-humane 
stop and other necessary additions for the organ, for which the 
Church will be accountable to him at his return. 

\ oted : that a vote passed by the Vestry at their last meeting, 
respecting the selling the house Mr. Brinley lives in, be reconsidered 
and that the said house, together with all the estate belonging to 
Nath 1 Kay, Esq., the house in the school-house yard included.be 
leased to Mr. Francis Brinley for tin term of seven years, at the 
rate of ^62, sterling, per annum, and that he be obliged to lay out 
SiOO in repairing the house he lives in, and that lie keep the said 
estate always in good repair, at his own charge, and that the said 
house be painted at the expense of the Church, as soon as oil and 
colors can be procured. 

October 29, 1770. The congregation voted: that the Church 
Wardens be desired to employ proper person- to take down the 
spindle and scroll-work from the top of the spire, which was broken 
off in the great storm on Saturday last, and that they inquire at the 
same time whether it is practicable to have the same repaired this 
fall, and make report to the congregation at a future meeting. 

November 5, 1 770. The Church Wardens reporting to the con- 
gregation that they had employed persons to take down the scroll- 
work, &c, from the top of the mast of the steeple, and had con- 
sulted about repairing the same this fall, voted : that the spar w hich 
is now fixed within the tower for doing the above-mentioned work, 
remain, and that the necessary repairs be put off until the next 
spring, for more suitable weather to do the same. 15 ' 

Monday, March 18, 1 77 1 . At a meeting of the Vestry at the 
parsonage house, the Rev. Mr. Browne having departed this lift on 



157 In a severe blow from the north-east, the spindle broke off just below 
the upper ball, and was only prevented from falling by the lightning-rod. 



j 44 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Saturday morning last, the 16 th inst., it was voted unanimously: 
that he be buried in a decent manner, at the expense of the Church, 
and every mark of respect in their power shewed to his memory ; 
and the Church Wardens were requested to wait upon the Rev. Mr. 
Bisset, and desire him to preach a funeral sermon on the day he is 
buried, and to officiate till after Easter. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 14. 



CHAPTER IX. 

i 771-1 780. 

" On Thursday the 21 st of March, 1771, Mr. Fayerweather being 
invited by a letter from the Church Wardens of Trinity Church, New 
port, he attended as a pall-bearer the funeral of the Rev. Marmaduke 
Browne, 157 ' pastor of said Church, when a sermon was preached by 



,57a Rev. Marmaduke Browne was a native of Ireland. In 1730 he was 
sent to America, as missionary, and was settled at Providence for a time. 
From there he removed to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where his father, 
also a missionary, had a parish. In 1760, on the withdrawal of Rev. Mr. 
Pollen, as already stated, he was elected minister of Trinity Church. His 
wife died in 1767, of which event the following minutes was made in the 
records of St. Paul's, Narragansett, under date of January 9, 1767 : 

" Mr. F. [Fayerweather] was sent for to attend the funeral of Mrs. Browne, 
the consort of the Rev. Mr. Browne, over whom he performed the funeral 
service in Trinity Church, Newport. An exceedingly large concourse o\ 
people attended, but no sermon, as both the lady herself, and her hus- 
band, too, had an utter aversion to pomp and show on those occasions, 
and utterly against all parading." 

Rev. Mr. Browne left a son, Arthur Browne, who became a distinguished 
man of letters. Immediately following his father's death, then a lad, he 
wrote to Mr. John Bours, Senior Warden of the Church : 

•' Portsmouth, May i6 tL , 1 7 7 1 . 
" Dear Mr. Bours : 

It seems to me most proper to write to you ( oncerning the follow- 
ing affair, both as Church Warden, and as being one of my best friend-. 
My Grandfather declines drawing upon the Society, and thinks it 
would be best for the gentlemen who are Church Wardens, not to 
draw, but to write to the Society, informing them of my father's death, 
of his leaving me wholly unprovided for, by which means there was a 
great chance of ra\ losing a liberal education at home, whither my father 



146 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

the Rev. Mr. Bisset, colleague of the Rev. Mr. Browne, to a very- 
numerous and weeping congregation." — Records of the Narragansett 
Church^ 

Easter Monday, April i, 177 1 . John Bours and Isaac Lawton 
were elected Church Wardens, John Grelea, Clerk, and Charles 
Bardin, organist, until the arrival of Dr. Evans from England. Geo. 
English elected sexton. 

Vestrymen : Joseph Wanton, James Honyman, William Mum- 
ford, Thomas Wickham, Evan Malbone, Philip Wilkinson, Stephen 

designed to send me. He says I may be pretty sure, if those gentlemen 
would be so kind as to write [obliterated] of the Society's doing something 
handsome for me, especially if they would represent me in as favorable a 
light as they think proper, as a lad of some merit, who, if properly en- 
couraged, might turn out something. 

These are his words, not mine ; for not all the vanity natural to man 
should induce me to write thus of myself, were it not his direction. I 
know your friendship will excuse this trouble, which, notwithstanding 
after having troubled you so often, I am to give you, and I hope poor 
Peter was recovered before you got home. My love to Mrs. Bours. 

I receiv'd Mr. Sam Bours' kind letter, and found that I must chuse a 
guardian as he says. 1 hope poor Mrs. Bours has had no more ill turns. 
My compliments to all friends. My Grandfather and all the family join 
with me in love to you and Mrs. Bours, and believe me always, your 
affectionate, 

hum b Servant, 



C&l/nt*?y^Ul 



The above Arthur Browne was sent to Ireland, where he was educated 
and attained to a distinguished position. He was a man of marked charac- 
ter and high attainments, was made Fellow and Senior Proctor of Trinity 
College, a Doctor of Civil Law, King's Professor of Greek, &c. In his 
"Miscellaneous Essays and Dissertations," long out o\ print, he gives an 
entertaining account of society and manners in Rhode Island, and makes 
mention of many of the prominent men of that day. He also wrote a 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. .47 

Ayrault, John Mawdsley, Jahleel Brenton, Andrew Hunter, Simon 
Pease, John Hours and Francis Brinley. 

Voted: that a letter be written to the Society, informing them of 
the death of our worth)' minister, the late Mr. Browne, and solicit- 
ing a continuation of the mission, and that the Rev. Mr. Bisset be 
particularly recommended as a suitable person to succeed Mr. 
Browne, and that Mr. Honyman, with the Church Wardens, draft 
the said letter. 

Voted: that the Rev. Mr. Bisset be requested to officiate as 
Minister of the Church, and that he be paid £50, sterling, per 
annum by the congregation, the sum that was paid to the Rev. Mr. 
Browne, and that lu- have likewise the use of the parsonage-house 
until we hear from the Society ; and that Mr. Dudley, with the 
Church Wardens, be desired to acquaint Mr. Bisset with these 
resolutions of the Church. 

work on Civil Law, which is still valued by the profession. He died in 
1805. In 1795 ne caused a mural tablet, bearing a likeness of his father, 
in relief and the family coat of arms, with the following inscription, to be 
placed by the side of the Chancel in the Church : 

To the memory of the Rev. 

MARMADUKE BROWNE, 
A man eminent for talents, learning, and religion, who departed this life 
on the 19 th of March, 1771, and of ANN, his wife, a lady of uncommon 
piety and suavity of manners, who died the 6 ,b of January, 1 767. This mon- 
ument was erected by their son, ARTHUR BROWNE, Esq., now senior 
fellow of Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, and representative in Parlia- 
ment for the same: In token of his gratitude and affection to the best and 
tenderest of parents, and of his respect and Love for a Congregation 
among whom, and for the place where, he spent the earliest and happiest 
of his days. 

Heu ! Quanto minus est, 

Cum aliis Versari, 

Quam tui Memisse, 

M. D. CCXCV. 



1 48 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that the gentlemen who draft the letter to the Society, 
be requested to mention to them, in the same, the sending of a suit- 
able person for a school-master and assistant, provided they should 
appoint Mr. Bisset our minister. 

Voted : that Capt. Mawdsley, 1 '* Capt. Charles Wickham and Capt. 
Keith be a committee to repair the steeple, by having the spindle 
and vane put up again, in such manner as they shall judge best, as 
soon as the weather will permit. 

Voted: that an account exhibited to the Church for attendance 
and medicine for negro Markadore in his last illness, by Dr. Thomas 
Eyres, be paid by the Church Wardens. 

April 8, 1 77 1. Mr. Stephen Ayrault and James Honyman, Esq., 
were appointed a committee to visit Mr. Bisset's school from time 
to time, as often as they judge necessary, in order to see that the 
number of charity boys be always complete; and if there be any va- 
cancy at any time, they are requested to look out a proper boy to 
fill it. 

Voted : that the Church Wardens have the house Mr. Brinley 
lives in painted, agreeably to a former vote of the Vestry, in the best 
and cheapest manner they can, and the expense of the same be paid 
out of the money due to the Church. 

Voted : that the Rev. Mr. Browne's salary be paid up to Easter. 

[June 3, 1771. the Rev. Mr. Bisset preached a funeral sermon on 
the death of Mrs. Abigail Wanton, wife of Gov. Joseph Wanton, to 
whom she was married January _>6, 1756. j 15y 

15e John Mawdsley at one time had a large capital, which he employed 
in navigation. In 1776 he was one of a committee oi safety, but taking 
sides with the crown, his property was confiscated. His first wife was 
Sarah Clarke, to whom he was married April 20, 174O. She dying, he 
married Mary Bardin, August 3, 1766. He died February 21, 1795, aged 
71 years. 

159 "A sermon preached in Trinity Church, Newport, Rhode Island, 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 149 

June 25, 1 77 1. Voted by the congregation : that Mr. William S. 
Morgan be chosen organist of the Church for three months, provided 
Doct r Evans should not arrive from England within that time: Bui 
whereas Capt. Charles Bardin was chosen at Easter last, to officiate 
as organist until the return of said Dr. Evans from England, it is 
voted that said Bardin be paid one dollar per Sunday, out of the 
salary of .£30 per annum, formerly voted by the congregation for 
the support of the organist, until Easter next, and that said Morgan 
be paid at the rate of ^30 sterling per annum, after deducting said 
sum of one dollar per Sunday. 

Jul)- 1, 1771. Voted : that a tax of $1000 be immediately assessed 
on the pews, in order to discharge so much due from the Church 
on bond: being for money borrowed tor the repairs of the Church, 
and building the steeple ; and that those persons who are unable to 
pay the said tax be excused paying it, and the deficiency be made 
up by a subscription ; and that Mr. Simon Pease, Mr. James Keith, 
Mr. Thos. Wickham, Jr., and Mr. Samuel Freebody be a committee 
to apportion said tax, to judge what persons ought to be excused, 
and make a report to the congregation on Monday next. 

July 8, 1 77 1. The report made by the committee was received, 
and it was voted: that Messrs. Stephen Ayrault, Thomas Wickham, 
fr., and Capt. Isaac Lawton be requested to collect the tax, and that 
they have discretionary power to excuse, either in whole or in part, 
those persons whom the}' judge unable to pay the same. 

Mr. Andrew Hunter, in consequence of the infirmities of age, 



June 3, 1 771, at the Funeral of Mrs. Abigail Wanton, late consort of the 
Hon. Joseph Wanton, Jun., Esq., who died in the 36th year of her age. 
By George Bisset, A.M. Printed by Solomon Southwick." 

Ir is not clear who this Joseph Wanton, Jr., was. Bartlett, in his paper 
on ''The Wanton Family," thinks it was the Joseph who was Lieutenant- 
Governor from 1764 to 1767. 



150 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

asked to be excused from longer serving as a vestryman ; when it 
was voted unanimously that the thanks of the Church be given to 
Mr. Hunter for his past good services to the Church, and that the 
Wardens signify the same to him. 

Mr. Francis Malbone was chosen a Vestryman in the room of Mr. 
Andrew Hunter. 

October 14, 177 j. Mr. William S. Morgan was continued organist 
of the Church until Easter next, upon the same salary as was voted 
him when first chosen. 

October 16, 1 77 1 . Resolved: that James Honyman, Esq., be re- 
quested to draft a letter, to be signed by the Rev. Mr. Bisset, the 
Wardens and Vestry, to the Rev. Dr. Burton, Secretary of the 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, acquaint- 
ing him that the Rev. Willard Wheeler has offered to accept the 
school, provided there should be a vacancy, and to desire the So- 
ciety, if they have not already fixed upon a person to supply that 
place, not to give themselves any further trouble in the affair, as they 
would, in that case, accept of Mr. Wheeler. 

October 28, 1771. Meeting of the congregation. Whereas: the 
venerable Society for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts, in 
answer to a letter wrote them in April last, to inform them of the 
death of the Rev. Mr. Browne, and to solicit a continuation of the 
mission, entirely refuse to comply with our request to give any 
further salary to our minister; Resolved, unanimously: that a letter 
be wrote by the Rev. Mr. Bisset 160 and the Church Wardens, to the 

«t / (TY*/! (K Ot flJ Rev. George Bisset during the time 

n Yl *JdU®Ztr* that he had been connected with the 

U U C/ Church, as school-master and assist- 

tant minister, had won the esteem of the people. His election as minis- 
ter opened the way for him to marry, and he made choice of Penelope 
Honyman, daughter of James Honyman, Esq., for a wife, and they were 
married April 23, 1773. H' s ministry was successful till the war broke 



A / II PORT, RHODl TSL \ND. 151 

Society, to return them their thanks for their past favors conferred 
upon the Church. 

Resolved, unanimously : that the Rev. Mr. Bisset he our Minister, 
and that lie be allowed and paid the same salary that was ^iven to 
Mr. Browne, viz., ^133.6.8 lawful money of this Colony ; said salary 
to commence on Raster day next, April 19, 1772, anil that the same 
be collected by the Church Wardens and paid to him half-yearly; 

up the congregation : but he remained at his post, and when the British 
took possession of the town, it was not displeasing to him, tor he was a 
I oyalist. The services of the Church were continued, and the pews thai 
had once keen filled by those who formerly worshipped there, were now 
occupied by British troops. A sermon that he was to preach on the Sun- 
dav before the evacuation, had for its theme, •' Honesty the best policy in 
the worst of times. " It had for its text St. Luke, xviii, vs. 30, 31, and 32; 
but there was too much confusion preparatory to a hurried departure, to 
give heed to the Sabbath, and the sermon was put aside ; for Mr. Bisset, 
too. was among those who were about leaving. He went without his 
wife and little ones, who were left in the tender care of those who re- 
mained in the place. His furniture was seized by the State authorities, 
but was subsequently given up to his wife, who was allowed to go to New 
York by act of the General Assembly, June, 1780, under the direction of 
the Continental troops, where she joined her husband. While in New 
York Rev. Mr. Bisset preached the above sermon in St. Paul's, and also 
in St. George's. From New York he went to Fngland, where, in 17S4. 
the sermon was printed in Condon. 

Two of Mr. Bisset's sermons preached 111 Newport, were published: 

'• A Sermon preai hed in Trinity Church, Newport, R. I., June 3. 1771, 
at the Funeral of Mrs. Abigail Wanton, late consort of the Hon. Joseph 
Wanton, Jr., Esq., who died in the 7,6' h year of her age." 

"The Trial of a False Apostle. A Sermon preached in Trinit) Church, 
Newport, R. I., on Sunday, October 24, 177;,. By George Bisset, .A.M., 
Rector of said Church and Fellow of Rhode Island (oil. 

Rev. Mr. Bisset resided in London till 17S6, when he removed to St. 
John's, New Brunswick, where he. became Rectoi of St. John's. There 
he died, March 3, 1788. Mrs. Bisset died at Frederichton, N. B.. August 
2. 1816, in her 70th year. 

The Newport Herald, of April 24, 1788, in announcing the death of 



152 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

and that he enjoy the donation of Mr. Kay, with the ,£50 sterling 
voted him at Easter last, until said time, and that he also have the 
parsonage-house to live in. 

Voted : that the annual tax on the pews on the lower floor be 
raised to nine pence, lawful money, for every Sunday in the year; 
or, thirty-nine shillings lawful money for the whole year ; and that 
the pews in the gallery be at half said sum, viz. : four pence half 
pence lawful money ; in order to defray the expenses of the Church, 
said tax to commence at Easter next, to be paid half yearly. 

December 19, 177 1. Samuel Whitehorne was married to Ruth 
Gibbs. [She was the youngest child of George Gibbs, and was 
born in 1748.] 

[In Advent Mr. Fayerweather preached for the Rev. Mr. Bisset 
in Newport, by earnest request. On the 25 th day of December, 
1 77 1, it being Christmas, attended Trinity Church again, and ad- 
ministered communion at the altar, above two hundred members 
present. — History of the Narragansett Church. 

January 8, 1 772. Rev. Alexander Keith, Jr., died, and was buried 
in the church-yard. 

[Rev. Mr. Fayerweather, made the following entry in the records 
of St. Paul's, Narragansett: 

"January 9, 1772. Received a letter from the Church Wardens 
of Newport to attend as pall-bearer to the Rev. Mr. Keith, 161 my old 



Rev. Mr. Bisset, said of him : " The style of his composition was remark- 
ably elegant, and his reasoning seldom failed to force conviction on the 
minds of his hearers. As a divine he was equally distinguished for the 
sanctity of his manners, and the liberality of his sentiments. As a scholar 
he was free from pedantry, and as a gentleman he possessed the social vir- 
tues in an eminent degree, and never once lost sight of his sacred functions." 
" ;| Rev. Alexander Keith, Jr., born in Aberdeen, Scotland, was edu- 
cated at King's College. After his ordination he officiated for ten years 



NR}\rORl\ RHODE ISLAND. 



53 



friend, and once my predecessor in Georgetown, South Carolina, 
and to preach a funeral sermon on the occasion, which I did on tin- 
very day after the interment, in Trinity Church, to a full auditory." 

February 18, 1772. At a meeting of the congregation, voted : 
that the Church Wardens be directed to make out a list of all those 
persons who are delinquent in paying, and whom they judge able 
to pay a tax of six and one-half dollars, assessed on each pew, July, 
1 77 1, and that they deliver the said list to William Brooks Simp- 
son, Esq., attorney-at-law, and desire him to put the same in suit 
immediately, unless paid ; the former to a Justice Court, and the 
latter to the Court to be holden in May next. 

February 18. At an adjourned meeting of the congregation, 
voted : that John Brown, son of the late Peleg Brown, who is heir 
to .1 part of pew No. 89, which belonged to his s a father, have 
and enjoy the said \ part of said pew, and also \ part of said pew 
more, given him by Mrs. Elizabeth Gidley, said Brown paying \ 
parts of all rates, and taxes unpaid on said pew. 

February 29, 1772. Agreeable to a vote of the congregation, at 
their last meeting, the Church Wardens have hired of Messrs. 
William Vernon 162 and Benj. Mason, the sum of $769, silver Spanish 



in St. Paul's Chapel, Aberdeen, and when he came to America, he was 
plated in charge of the Church at Georgetown,' S. C. over which he 
presided during a period of twenty-five years. 

was born January 17, 1 719, 
and died December 22, 1806. 
His wife, Judith Harwood, 
daughter of Philip Harwood 
and great-granddaughter of 
Gov. Walter Clarke and Gov. 
Cranston, died August 29, 
1762, aged 38 years. Mr. 
Vernon was a distinguished merchant, a public-spirited citizen and a 

11 




i 5 4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

milled dollars, at 6 per cent, interest, in order to pay Capt. Charles 
Handy his bond : and the over-plus, with what is collected of the 
taxes, be appropriated towards discharging Capt. John Tillinghast's 
bond. 

April 9, 1772. Pew No. 22, belonging to Mrs. Frances Town 
send, widow of Solomon Townsend, by consent of the Wardens and 
Vestry, was disposed of to Mr. George Rome," a the arrearage hav- 
ing been first paid to the Church. 

Easter Monday, April 19, 1772. John Bours and Isaac Lawton 
were elected Church Wardens. John Grelea, clerk, and George 
English, sexton. 

Vestrymen : Joseph Wanton, Jr., Jas. Honyman, William Mum- 



patriot. He was an original member of the Artillery Company, 1741, 
and on the death of Abraham Redwood he was elected the second Presi- 
dent of the Redwood Library. In 1773 he was appointed by the General 
Assembly one of a committee of three to prepare a letter on a bill pend- 
ing in the House of Commons on the fisheries prosecuted by the mer- 
chants of Rhode Island, in and near the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The fol- 
lowing year he was one of a committee of correspondence of the Town of 
Newport with Boston, and in 1775 ne was engaged with others (William 
Ellery being one of the committee) in collecting statistics of the losses 
sustained by Rhode Island at the hands of the British. As President of 
the Continental Naval Board (elected by Congress, May 6, 1777,) he 
rendered able service to the country. The war over, he returned to New- 
port, and here passed the remainder of his days. 

163 George Rome came from England to Rhode Island in 1761, as agent 
of Hayley & Hopkins, a large commercial house in London. He divided 
his time between Newport and Narragansett, where he entertained his 
friends with great hospitality. In the trouble between the Colonies and 
England, he sided with the Crown, aroused the indignation of the people 
by his course, and was at length compelled to find shelter on board a man- 
of-war in the harbor. His property was seized by order of the General 
Assembly, and when sold the proceeds were turned into the General 
Treasurv. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 155 

ford, Thomas Wickham, Evan Malbone, 1 " Philip Wilkinson, 
Joseph Wanton, Jr., Charles Wickham, Thomas Cranston, Stephen 
Ayrault, John Mawdsley, Jahleel Brenton, Simon Pease, John 
Bours, Francis Brinley and Francis Malbone. 

Voted: that an alteration be made in the galleries, by removing 
the negroes to the west end of the Church, provided it be agreeable 
to the proprietors of the pews behind the organ to exchange their 
pews for those to be built at the south side of the gallery, where the 
negroes now sit, and the negroes can be as well accommodated as 
they are at present. 

Voted: that for the future, a person leaving the Church with his 
family, shall be at liberty to sell his pew without consent first ob- 
tained from the Wardens and Vestry. 

May 1 1, 1772. The Rev. Mr. Willard Wheeler was chosen As- 
sistant and School-master, on Mr. Kay's foundation ; his salary to 
commence from the first of last April. 

[From the Town Records : Whereas ye Church bell rings at 9 
of y 9 clock at night without any charge to y e Town, that for y' 
future John Simms, who rings Dr Stile's bell, and had nine dollars 
a year for y e same, be not allowed anything for ringing y* same.] 

Under date of 1772, in the Abstracts of the Proceedings of the 
Society, there is this entry: 

"Advice has been received of the death of the Rev. Mr. Marma- 
duke Browne, the Society's worthy missionary at Newport, in Rhode 
Island. The people have chosen Mr. Bisset, who used to assist the 
missionary, and kept the school founded by Mr. Kay. But the 
flourishing state and opulent circumstances of that parish having 



,,i4 Evan Malbone died at the village of Long Island, March 30, 1830, 
aged i>$ years. For many years he was a member of the Legislature of 
Connecticut. 



156 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 

been fully represented, the Society do not think it consistent with 
their trust to give any longer a salary from hence, as it would pre- 
vent their bounty where it is more wanted, to other Churches, which 
cannot be supported without their assistance." 

[Rev. Mr. Page, Chaplain to the Right. Hon. Countess of 

Huntingdon, arrived here March I, 1773, and preached in Trinity- 
Church on the following Sunday. — Nezvport Mercury '.] 

Easter Monday, April 12, 1773. John Bours and Isaac Lawton 
were elected Church Wardens, and the clerk and sexton were re- 
elected. No change was made in the Vestry. 

Voted: that the Church Wardens be requested to write to some 
proper person in London, to desire his assistance in procuring an 
organist as soon as may be, and that they represent the encourage- 
ment that will be given by the Church to a suitable person for that 
office ; and that Mr. Charles Bardin officiate as organist in the mean- 
time ; and that he be allowed and paid for his services at the rate of 
sixty Spanish milled dollars per annum. 

Voted : that the Wardens have the parsonage-house newly shingled 
if they find it absolutely wants it. 

John Freebody 165 died, in his 67th year. 

May 26, 1773. Mrs. Mary Lightfoot, consort of Robert Light- 
foot, 166 Esq., died. 



165 u j j in Freebody was a gentleman of great integrity and unblemished 
morals, and in all his various connections, both in public and private life, 
he discharged his duties with that faithfulness and affection which are the 
true characteristics of a mind that delighted with the practice of virtue." 
— Newport Mercury. 

166 Robert Lightfoot had many friends in Newport. At the time that he 
held the office of Judge of Vice Admiralty in the Southern District of the 
United States, he came here in enfeebled health, and finding the place so 
attractive, he gave up his office and settled here, dividing his time between 
Newport and Narragansett. His daughter Frances, who died in 1800, lies 
buried in the church -yard. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 157 

June 3, 1773. Charles Bardin died. 

September 12, 1773. Christopher Mardenbrough 167 was married 
to Rhoda Fryers. 

December 20, 1773. Meeting of the congregation. Whereas, 
Mr. William Selby 1 " is arrived in town from London, in consequence 
of an application made to him by the Wardens of the Church, and 
now offers himself as an organist, and the congregation having heard 
him officiate, and think him a suitable person to sustain said office, 
it is therefore voted: that he be received as organist of the Church, 
and that he be paid at the rate of £30 sterling per annum, to com- 
mence from the first day of October last ; and that the Wardens be 
requested to collect by subscription, ten guineas or more, for him, 
towards paying his passage to America. 

Easter Monday, April 4, 1774. The officers of the previou 5 year, 
were re-elected, with the addition of William Selby. as organist. 

Voted: that Mr. Peter Cooke have the improvement of the lot of 
land adjoining the distil-house lot, and bounded upon the harbor, 
part of Mr. Kay's estate, at the annual rental of twenty shillings, 
sterling, and that the Church Wardens give him a lease of the same 
for the term of twenty-one years from this time ; Mr. Cooke to build 
a stone wall before the same, to keep it from washing into the sea. 
Voted : that a tax of twenty-eight shillings, lawful money, be 
assessed on the single pews below, and fourteen shillings on the 
gallery pews in order to pay off part of the bond due to Messrs. 
Vernon and Mason. 



"~ Christopher Mardenbrough came from the Island of St. Christo- 
phers and settled in Newport. He died October 25, 1806. 

Ifii William Selby advertised in January, 1774. that he had just arrived 
from London, and would "teach the violin, flute, harpsicord and other 
instruments in use," and that he intended to open a dancing school. 

August 1, 1774. Selby gave a concert of instrumental and vocal music 
at the Court House. 



i 5 8 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that Mr. Simon Pease be requested to write to his 
friend in London, for a new stop for the organ, agreeably to Mr. 
Selby's direction. 

May 23, 1774. James Bisset, 169 son of Rev. George Bisset, and 
Penelope, his wife, was baptized by his father. 

December 27, 1774. Brenton Halliburton was baptized. 

January 22, 1775. Joseph Wanton, Jr., was married to Miss 
[Sarah] Brenton, daughter of the late Jahleel Brenton. 

Easter Monday, April 17, 1775. The officers of the previous year 
were re-elected. 

May 1, 1775. Lieut. James Conway 17 " died, and was buried in 
the church-yard, aged 45 years. 

Easter Monday, April 8, 1776. No change was made in the 
officers of the Church. 

April 15, 1776. Voted: that Mr. Francis Malbone and Mr. 
Simon Pease be added to the Church Wardens, as a committee to 
wait upon the Rev. Mr. Wheeler, and acquaint him that the Vestry 
and congregation are greatly disappointed and dissatisfied with re- 
gard to his school, and that, as many difficulties arise from the un- 
happy situation of public affairs, in collecting the rents and taxes of 
the Church, to support the officers, they would have no objection to 
Mr. Wheeler's 171 being removed to another more advantageous 
living. 

Easter Monday, March 31, T777. The Wardens and Vestry were 
re-elected. James Gibbs was elected clerk in place of John Grelea. 



lfi;( The child was ]>robably named after his grandfather, James Hony- 
man. 

,7n Lieut. Conway was a Lieutenant of Marines, and was attached to the 
man-of-war, Rose, then stationed in this Bay. 

171 This probably closed the connection with Mr. Wheeler, for no fur- 
ther reference is made to him in the records. 



VEWPORT, RHODF ISLAND. 159 

February i, 1778, Major John Breese 172 was married to Elizabeth 
Malbone. 

Easter Monday, April 20, 1778. John Hours and Isaac Lawton 
were elected Church Wardens : James Gibbs, clerk ; Thomas Law- 
ton, clerk of the Vestry; George English, sexton. 

Vestrymen: Joseph Wanton, Evan Malbone, Philip Wilkinson, 
Joseph Wanton, Jr., Charles Wickham, Thomas Cranston, Stephen 
Ayrault, John Mawdsley, Jahleel Brenton, John Hours, Francis 
Rrinley, Francis Malbone, Isaac Lawton, Thomas Wickham, Wil 
liam Wanton, and James Keith. 

March 29,1779.' Henry Goldsmith was married to Mary Mason.' 7 * 

Easter Monday, April 5, 1779. No change was made in the 
officers of the Church. 

April 27, 1780. At a meeting of the congregation, April 27, 
1780. Voted: that Messrs. George Gibbs, Christopher Champlin, 
Thomas Freebody and John Bours be a committee to lease out all 
the estates belonging to the Church, upon the best terms they can, 
and that they make what repairs they judge necessary on the parson- 
age-house, the church and fence around the yard ; and that they 



,7 '-' Major John Breese was an officer in the British Army, 54th regiment. 
When the British retired from the Island, he left the army and settled in 
Newport. In 1796 he was appointed British Viee Consul for Rhode Isl- 
and, and died here April 23, 1799. Mrs. Breese, who was the daughter 
of Francis and Margaret (Saunders) Malbone, died May 22, 1832. 

'" This was the last marriage ceremony performed by the Rev. Mr. 
Bisset before he took his hurried departure with the British troops. 

Henry Goldsmith was born in the County of Wcstmeath, Ireland, July 
4, 1755. His wife, Mary Mason, daughter of Benj. Mason and grand- 
daughter of Daniel Ayrault, was born November 9, 1759. Mr. Gold- 
smith adhered to the Crown. After the birth of his first child he removed 
to St. Andrews, N. S., from there to Annapolis Royal, then to Halifax, 
and. finally in 1800, to England, where he and his wife died. They had 
fourteen children born to them. 



160 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

make some allowance, at their discretion, to Mr. George English 
for his past services as sexton. 

Voted, also : that the said committee make inquiry relative to the 
estate of William Tate, which was left by will to the Church after 
the death of his wife, who had lately deceased : and that they make 
report to the Church. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 161 



CHAPTER X. 

T 780-I 785. 

May 5, 1780- The committee appointed by the Church, at their 
meeting on the 27th of April last, to lease out all the estates belonging 
to the Church, have this clay agreed with Mr. Francis Brinlev that 
he should pay ninety silver dollars for the rent of the house and lot 
he now improves, for the present year. That Mr. George Scott have 
a lease of the lot of about eight acres, he improves, for the present 
year, for forty-five silver dollars, and that Mr. Jabez Champlin live 
in the parsonage-house this year, at forty-five dollars per annum 
rent. Agreed also, that a rough fence be put around the church- 
yard, and that two carpenters be consulted upon the cost, and that 
if it should not exceed $25, silver, it be done immediately. 171 



174 The town of Newport was at this time in a deplorable condition ; its 
trade was gone, some hundreds of dwellings, store-houses and barns had 
been destroyed by the British, its people were scattered, and those who 
had been forced to remain at home were so impoverished that they could 
only secure in scanty measure means for the support of their families. To 
do much for the Church was out of the question ; but the will was there 
and, step by step, they gradually brought it up to its former standard ; 
though it was not till 1786, that they could command the services of a 
settled pastor. In the meantime the pulpit was filled as opportunity 
offered; and when a clergyman could not be obtained, tine congregation 
were drawn together, to listen to a lay reader. For some time, beginning 
in 1780, while his own church was being repaired, the Rev. Gardiner 
Thurston, Pastor of the Second Baptist Society, occupied the pulpit and 
his own people were invited to worship there. The services of the Church 
were also condueted by Rev. John Graves, then residing in Providence 
without a parish, Rev. Moses Badger, who was at Newport at the time 



1 62 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

July 22, 1780. M. de Vilernaas, 175 First-Lieut, of the French 
frigate Hermione, was buried in the church-yard. 

August 29, 1780. Mr. James Keith 17fi died and was buried in the 
church-yard. 

Easter Monday, April 16, 1781. John Bours and Francis Mal- 
bone were elected Church Wardens, James Gibbs, Clerk, and Geo. 
English, sexton. 

Vestrymen : Philip Wilkinson, Charles Wickham, Thomas Crans- 
ton, Stephen Ayrault, John Bours, Francis Brinley, Francis Mal- 
bone, James Keith, Charles Handy, Christopher Champlin, George 
Gibbs, Henry Hunter, Thomas Freebody, Samuel Freebody, Silas 
Cooke and John Malbone. 

Voted : that Messrs. George Gibbs, Christopher Champlin, 
Thomas Freebody, and John Bours be a committee to lease the 
estates of the Church upon the best terms they can ; and that they 
inquire about a lot of land at Narraganselt, left by will towards the 
support of the Minister of the Church for the time being, by Na- 
thaniel Norton. 

July 27, 1 78 1. Heithcote Murison,' 77 of Fairfield, Ct., died, and 
was buried in the church-yard. 



that he was called to St. John's, Providence, in 1786, and Rev. Samuel 
Parker, of Boston, when he could arrange to fill the pulpit. 

175 M. de Valernaas died of wounds received in the action between the 
Hermione and the British frigate Iris, and was interred with military 
honors. The Hermione, commanded by the Chevalier de la Touch, had 
reached Newport, June 19, 1780. 

IW James Keith was a relative of the Rev. Alexander Keith, Jr., by whose 
side his remains were placed. He was born at Aberdeen, Scotland, had 
resided in America nearly forty years, and had attained to his 70th year. 
"As he lived beloved he died lamented." 

177 Heithcote Murison died of wounds received in the excursion of out- 
allies to Long Island. He was of a very respectable family on Long Island, 
very attractive in his manners, and full of zeal for the cause, which latter 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 163 

September 29, 1781. Francis Malbone 178 was married to Kather- 
ine Pease, by Rev. Samuel Parker, of Boston. 

Easter Monday, April 1, 17X2. No change was made in the 
officers of the Church, save that Capt. James Arnold was added to 
the Vestry, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Capt. James 
Keith. 

Voted: that the Wardens make an allowance to the clerk and 
sexton out of the money collected at Church on the first Sunday of 
every month, to begin in May. 

May 23, 1782. Mr. William Tweedy 1 ™ died, and was buried in 
the church-yard. 

Easter Monday, April 21,1 7S3. The officers of the Church were 
re-elected, with Samuel Rrenton as Vestryman, in place of Philip 
Wilkinson, deceased. 

July 20, 1783. Mr. John Meunscher was employed as organist, 
at the rate of one dollar per Sunday. 

August 17, 1783. Henry Edwin Stanhope 180 was married to 
Peggie Malbone by Rev. Mr. Fogg. 



quality led him to become a volunteer in an enterprise which cost him his 
life. His remains, followed by the gentlemen of the town, and a great 
number of French officers, with a detachment of troops, were interred 
with military honors. He was 26 years of age. — Newport Mercury. 

178 Francis Malbone died in 1785. His widow died in Boston in 1817. 
and her remains were brought here for interment. 

179 "The Sunday following the death of Mr. Tweedy, his remains, at- 
tended by his connections and numerous friends, were carried to Trinity 
Church, where the ceremony and an excellent sermon, well adapted to th< 
solemnity of the occasion, were performed by a particular friend of the de- 
ceased, after which they were interred in the church-yard." — Newport 
Mercury. 

'"" Henry Edwin Stanhope, vice-admiral of the blue, was the only son 
of the Hon. Edwin Francis Stanhope, cousin to the Earl of Chesterfield, 
and the Rt. Hon. Lady Catherine, daughter of John, Marquis of Caer- 
navon, eldest son of James, Duke of Chandos. Peggie Malbone was the 



1 64 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

October 5, 1783. Gilbert Eames 151 died, and was buried in the 
church-yard. 

October io, 1783. Richard Chilcot was married to Elizabeth 
Thurston by Rev. Gardiner Thurston. 

November 20, 1783. Thomas Russell 182 was married to Ann 

Handy- 

November 24, 1783. Voted by the congregation : that the Church 
Wardens and Vestry be requested to petition the General Assembly 
for liberty to dispose of the lot of land left to the Church by Na- 
thaniel Norton, deceased, late of Newport, lying in North King- 
ston, the same being of no use to the Church, and that the money 
arising from the sale thereof be invested in real estate in New- 
port. 

December 28, 1783. William R. Robinson 183 was married to Ann 
Scott by Rev. Mr. Badger. 

Easter Monday, April n, 1784. John Bours and Francis Mal- 
bone were chosen Church Wardens ; James Gibbs, Clerk ; John 
Meunscher, organist; Daniel Vernon, sexton. 



daughter of Francis and Margaret Malbone. She died in England, in 
August, 1809. 

1R1 Gilbert Fames was for many years one of the Honorable Council of 
the Island of Granada, prior to its reduction by the French in 1779. He 
was born in the County of Limerick, Ireland, and was in his 54th year at 
the time of his death. 

182 Major Thomas Russell, son of Thomas, was born September 28, 
1758, and died in Newport, February 19, 180 1. When but eighteen years 
of age he was commissioned a lieutenant in Col. Henry Sherburne's regi- 
ment, and subsequently was appointed Aid-de-camp to Brig. -Gen. Starke. 
In 1 781 he retired from the service and devoted himself to business. His 
wife was the daughter of Capt. Charles Handy. 

ls:1 William R. Robinson was the son of Rowland Robinson, and grand- 
son of Lieutenant-Governor William Robinson. He died without issue. 
His wife was the daughter of George Scott. After his death she married 
Dr. |ohn Preston Mann, and died October 10, 1841, aged 77 years. 



NEW PORT. RHODE ISLAND. 165 

Voted: that the Wardens dispose of the lot of land given to the 
Church by the late Nathaniel Norton, agreeably to an aet of the 
Genera] Assembly, for the most they can obtain for it ; and that the 
amount of the same be laid out in a lot of land in Newport, 
the annual rent of said lot to be appropriated for the use afore- 
said. 

Voted: that Mr. Charles Handy and Mr. George Gibbs be a 
committee to view the lot of seven acres of land, part of Mr. Kay's 
donation, and that they take into consideration a proposal made by 
Mr. George Scott to the Church for exchanging the said lot for the 
same quantity of land adjoining the house now improved by Mr. 
Brinley, and make report at the next meeting. 

Voted: that Mr. Handy, Mr. Gibbs and Mr. Champlin, with Mr. 
Brinley, be a committee to draw up a plan for settling a minister, 
and for fixing on ways and means for his maintenance ; and that they 
propose to Mr. Bours his taking orders and becoming our minister; 
and that the congregation be notified to meet here again on Mon- 
day, the 19th, to receive their report. 

Vestrymen elected : Charles Wickham, Stephen Ayrault, John 
Bours, Francis Brinley, Francis Malbone, 1 *' Charles Handy, Chris- 
Col. Frani is Mal- 
bone, bom March 
20, 1 759, was the 
son of Francis 
Malbone, of Vir- 
ginia. He was in 

business in Newport, first with his brother, Evan Malbone, who died in 
August, 1784, and then with Daniel Mason, who died in September, 1797. 
Col. Malbone was one of the most popular men of his day. He left New- 
port, February 20, 1809, to take his seat in Congress, and while ascend- 
ing the steps of the Capitol the following June, to attend divine service, 
fell and immediately expired. The Senate, of which body he was a mem- 
ber, voted to attend his funeral, and to erect a monument, in Washington, 




Wo^fo^^ 



1 66 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

topher Champlin, George Gibbs, Henry Hunter, Thomas Freebody, 
Samuel Freebody, John Mawdsley, Thomas Wickham, John Mai- 
bone, Samuel Brenton, Joshua Arnold. 

April 19, 1784. Adjourned meeting of the congregation. 

Voted: that Mr. Charles Handy and Mr. George Gibbs be con- 
tinued a committee to make an exchange of land with Mr. George 
Scott, provided his first proposal be adhered to by him, of giving 
acre for acre, and if an exchange be made, that the same gentlemen 
endeavor to obtain a passage to it through land belonging to the 
Jews by making an exchange also with them. 

Voted : that the rent of the house Mr. Brinley improves be 
affixed at the same sum that Gen. Greene gave for the hire of the 
estate of the late John Tillinghast, to which Mr. Brinley con- 
sented. 

Voted : that Col. Malbone, Mr. Sam 1 Brenton, Mr. Fran Mal- 
bone and Capt. John Northam be a committee to apply to every 
proprietor of a pew in the Church, with the report now made to, 
and accepted by, the congregation, assembled by adjournment, to 
receive the same, by Mr. Chas. Handy, Mr. Brinley, Mr. Samuel 
Freebody, and Mr. George Gibbs, relating to settling a minister, 
and that the said proprietors be requested to signify their approba- 
tion of the same, by affixing their names thereto. 

" We whose names are hereunto annexed, being proprietors of 
pews in Trinity Church, do manifest our approbation of the plan for 
settling a minister, contained in a report made by the above gentle- 
men, and accepted by the congregation, assembled at the Church, 
on Monday, the 12 th day of April, 1784. 

to his memory. Mrs. Malbone was the daughter of William and Catha- 
rine Tweedy. She died in 1829, at the age of 66 years. Her daughter, 
Freelove Sophia Malbone, became the wife of Dr. Edmund T. Waring. 
Mrs. Malbone was the widow of Simon Pease at the time of her marriage 
to Col. Malbone, in September, 1782. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 167 

"Susannah Mumford, Abigail Redwood, John Cranston, Steph" 
Deblois, John Handy, Sam 1 Brenton, Tho" Greene, Abigail Cogge- 
shall, Godfrey Wenwood, 185 Benj. Mumford, John Northam, Cha 3 
Wickham, Ab b Wilkinson, Henry Hunter, Mary Overing, N. Bird, 
Mary Dupuy, Gid. Sisson, Deb 1 Hunter, Phebe Champlin, Francis 
Mumford, Jabez Champlin, Francis Malbone, John Malbone, I-1.1 
Brinley, Maj r Fairchild, Sam 1 Whitehorn, William Shaw, Steph" 
Ayrault, Thomas Arnold, Sam 1 Freebody, Benj. Gardner, John 
Mawdsley, Sarah Wanton, Eliz. Scott, Abraham All, Catharine 
Tweed)-, Esther Morris, Thos. Halpin, Peter Mumford, David Mel- 
ville, Josiah Arnold, John Banister, Cha 8 Handy, James Duncan, 
Richard Bourke, George Gibbs, Peleg Wood, Dan 1 Mason, Rob 1 
Stoddard, Mary Thurston, Mary Coddington, John Miller, Eliza- 
beth Lechmere, Mary Paul, Sam 1 Sweet, Benj. Fry, Thos. Webber, 
Adam Ferguson, Amy Goldthwait, Fra 8 Malbone, Jr. 

May 7, 1784. Voted: that an exchange of land be made with 
Mr. Scott, acre for acre, and that Mr. Christopher Champlin and 
Mr. Peter Mumford be requested to view both the lots and allow Mr. 
Scott what they shall think just, for what fencing Mr. Scott's lot has 
more on it than the Church lot; that the said gentlemen apply to 
the General Assembly to ratify the exchange, and that they give 
the offer to Gen. Greene, of the lot exchanged. 

Voted : that Capt. John Northam be requested to act as assistant 
Warden, under Mr. Bours. 

The report of the committee to consider and draw up a plan for 



u " 5 Godfrey Wainwood died October 2, 1S16, aged 77 years. He was 

married to Mary Campbell. May 19, 1775. He was a baker, on Ban- 
nester's wharf, and claimed to have, been instrumental in bringing to 
light Dr. Church's treasonable correspondence with the enemy, in the 
early stages of the Revolution. Gen. Washington gave the particulars of 
the discovery, in a letter to the President of Congress, under date of 
October 5, 1775. 



1 68 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

settling" and supporting a minister, was made and accepted, and is 
as follows : 

" We, the subscribers, having been chosen a committee by the 
congregation of Trinity Church, at said Church assembled, April 
12, 1784, to consider on some plan to settle and support a minister, 
do report : that we have taken the situation of said Church under 
consideration and are of the opinion that it is able to support a 
minister, and would recommend the following plan for that purpose, 
viz. : 

"That the late Mr. Kay's donation to said Church be improved 
by the Minister, for the present, he keeping the same in good re- 
pair, and instructing ten poor boys, agreeable to Mr. Kay's will ; 
and that a tax of twenty-eight shillings, lawful money, per annum, 
to be paid half yearly, be assessed on each pew below, and twelve 
shillings per annum, in the galleries, and that ^"93.6.8, per annum, 
be paid our Minister, half yearly, out of the money so collected by 
the tax, to make up a comfortable support for him, in addition to 
what he may receive from Mr. Kay's donation. 

" And whereas, it appears to be the unanimous wish of the 
congregation, at their meeting on Easter Monday, that Mr. Bours, 
who has officiated in the Church as a lay reader, to their entire 
satisfaction, for upwards of two years, would enter into holy orders 
and become their minister, would recommend an offer being made 
to Mr. Bours to that purpose; allowing him a reasonable time to re- 
solve whether he will accept ; and that he be requested, in the 
meantime, to proceed as he has done, and that he be allowed ,£30 
per annum, and the use of the parsonage-house, for his services. 

" We would further recommend that these proceedings be made 
known to every proprietor of pews in said Church, that their minds 
thereon may be known, as we are satisfied the prosperity of the 
Church depends on our choice of a minister. 

Chas. Handy, 
Fran. Brinley, 
Sam l Freebody, 
Geo. Gibbs." 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 169 

July 11, 1784. Capt. John Grimes'"' 1 was married to Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Christan. 

September 10, 1784. Voted: that Mr. Bours be requested to 
proceed in officiating in the Church, as heretofore, notwithstanding 
his letter of decline. H7 

•Voted : that Mr. Hours invite the Rev. Mr. Badger to officiate 
occasionally for a few Sundays. 

Voted that Mr. Christopher Champlin and Mr. P. Mumford be 
requested to proceed in the exchange of land with Mr. George 



John Grimes was a patriot, and was active in annoying the enemy 
in Narragansett Hay, in the Revolution. At one time he commanded a 
privateer. He died in the West Indies. His wife's maiden name was 
Cowley, daughter of Joseph Cowley. Crimes was her third husband. 
After his death she was married for the fourth time, and became the wife 
of Thomas Tromp Tyrrell, who died January 28, 1806. Mrs. Tyrrell 
died August 19, 1830, in her 77th year. 

Newport, July 26, 17X4. 
Gentlemen : 

Impressed with the most grateful sense of the honor conferred on 
me. at your meeting on Raster Monday last, by your unanimous vote and 
proposal to me to enter into holy orders, and to become your minister. I 
now feel myself obliged in conscience, as well as duty to the Church, to 
defer my answer no longer, but to inform you, that after the most mature 
deliberation, I am fearful that sacred office would be incompatible with 
my present circumstances, and therefore must, tho' reluctantly, decline 
the offer. 

\> you cannot be insensible of my having the welfare and prosperity 
of the Church near my heart, so you will not doubt my readiness, at all 
times, to co-operate with you in any eligible plan for settling a minister. 
In the meanwhile, if it is your desire, I will continue to keep the congrega- 
tion together in the way we are in. May heaven direct us to the best. 
With every sentiment of love and affection, I remain, Gentlemen. 

Your most obe.t, Hum 1 '' Serv't, 

J. Bours. 
The Wardens, Vestry and Congregation of Trinity Church. 

12 



i yo ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Scott, and settle the dispute relative to the fencing the same, in the 
best manner they can. 

October 24, 1784. John Meunscher 188 was married to Johanna 
Sophia Knotchell. December 13, 1784. William Atherton, 1 - 9 of 
Jamaica, was married to Mrs. Sarah Wanton. 

The ceremony in both instances was performed by the Rev Moses 
Badger. 

March 10, 1785. W T illiam Littlefield 190 was married to Elizabeth 
Brinley by Rev. Moses Badger. 

Easter Monday, March 2J, 1785. No change made in the offi- 
cers of the Church. 

Voted : that a tax of twenty-eight shillings, lawful money, be 
assessed on the pews below, and of fourteen shillings in the gal- 
leries. 

188 Knotchell, the organist, had died July 20, 1783, and his widow mar- 
ried Meunscher, the new organist. 

189 Mrs. Atherton, who was the daughter of Jahleel Brenton, and the 
widow of Joseph Wanton, Jr. (to whom she was married January 2, 1775, ) 
died July 19, 1787, aged 35 years. Immediately after her death Mr. Ather- 
ton disposed of his household goods and went to England, where he had a 
tablet prepared, bearing the following inscription, which he sent to 
America, and had it set up in the Church, in November, 1788 : 

" Sacred may this marble long remain (the just tribute of a husband's 
affections) to the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Atherton. wife of William 
Atherton, of Jamaica, Esq., and daughter of Jahleel Brenton, Esq., and 
Mary his wife, of Newport, who was translated from this to a happier 
State, on the 19th of June, 1787, aged 35 years; while her Ashes rest 
entombed in the Clifton burying-ground in this Town. 

" If an assemblage of all the Virtues which adorn and dignify the Soul, 
united to Elegance of Person and Refinement of manners could have 
rescued her from Death, she still had lived." 

190 Capt. William Littlefield was born on Block Island. He entered the 
army in the Revolution, and was on the staff of Maj.-Gen. Greene, who 
married his sister. His son William, for a number of years, was Collector 
of the Port of Newport. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAXD. i 7 i 

Voted : that Mr. Bours be requested to officiate in the Church, as 
he has done, for the year ensuing, and that he be paid for his services 
^30, lawful money, and have the improvement of the parsonage- 
house and lot, as the last year. 

Voted: that Col. Christopher Champlin, Mr. George Gibbs. Mr. 
Samuel Freebody and Capt Charles Handy be a committee to call 
upon Mr. Brinley, Mr. George Scott and others, who are indebted 
to the Church on account of the Kay estate, and receive of them the 
money due, and pay the same to Mr. William Vernon, in part of the 
bond due from the Church to the heirs of Peter Dorden, deceased; 
and that said committee be clothed with power to lease out for one 
or more, but not to exceed seven, years, all the said estate, upon the 
best terms they can ; that ten poor boys, whose parents belong to 
the Church, have their schooling paid by the Wardens out of the 
rents ; and the remainder, after the necessary repairs are deducted, 
be appropriated towards paying the said bond. 

May 2, 1785. The committee made report of their proceedings 
with regard to the negotiation with Mr. Brinley and Mr. Scott, and 
the deed of the land is agreed to be signed by the Wardens and 
Vestry, and the exchange completed with Mr. George Scott. 



172 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 




CHAPTER XI. 

i 785-1789. 

May 29, 1785. Henry Sherburne 191 was married to Catharine 
Tweedy, by Rev. Moses Badger. 

June 26, 1785. Thomas Grosvenor, of Connecticut, was married 
to Ann Mumford, by the Right Reverend Bishop Seabury. 192 

The Wardens and Vestry of Trinity Church received aletterfrom 



Col. Henry 
Sherburne was 
tt/l^UZ^S* Revolution- 
ary officer. His 
first commis- 
sion, dated July 1, 1775, was signed by John Hancock; and, as Major, 
he was attached to the regiment commanded by Col. Church. Dur- 
ing the war he lost all his property, and needing some employment 
after the return of peace, he was appointed commissioner to adjust the 
accounts between Rhode Island and the United States. From October 
1 792 to 1808 he was General Treasurer of the State of Rhode Island, and 
he held other offices ; but the one that gave him the most satisfaction was 
a mission to the Choctaws and Chickasaw Indians, in which he was so 
successful as to call forth a vote of thanks from Congress. He died May 
31, 1824, aged 77 years. Mrs. Sherburne was the widow of William 
Tweedy, and the daughter of James Honyman, Esq. 

192 Rt. Rev. Bishop Seabury, on his return from England, landed at 
Halifax; from there he came to Newport, reaching here June 25th, on his 
way to New London. The following day he performed the marriage 
ceremony. This was probably the first couple that he married in America 
after he was raised to the Episcopate. He also preached in the Church, 
from Hebrews xii., 1 and 2, and this was his first sermon after his 
return. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 173 

Rev. Samuel Parker, under date of August 1, 1 7 S 5 , calling their 
attention to a vote at a convention of Episcopal clergymen of Mas- 
sachusetts and Rhode Island, held at Boston, September 8, 17X4, 
appointing the Rev. Edward Bass, Rev. Nathaniel Fisher and Rex- 
Samuel Parker, a committee, with power to call a convention of the 
Episcopal Churches in Massachusetts and the neighboring States, 
" at such time and place as they might deem most necessary and 
convenient." Notice was given in this letter that there would be 
such a convention in Boston on the 7th of the following September 
" to deliberate upon some plan of maintaining uniformity in divine 
worship, and adopt such other measures as may tend to the pros- 
perity and union of the Episcopal Church in the American States." 
Trinity Church was asked to send one or more delegates to the 
convention. 

The Wardens replied, August 9th, that it was their purpose to 
lay the matter before the congregation ; but that before doing so, 
" several of the gentlemen of the Vestry have signified a desire to 
know what was the result of the convention of the Clergy, held the 
last week at Middletown," adding : "As we have the interest of the 
Episcopal Church in America greatly at heart, we shall think our- 
selves happy in promoting any measures that may tend to forward 
the same." 

To this letter Rev. Mr. Parker replied : 

roN, August 15, 17S5. 
Messrs. Bours and Malbone, 

Wardens, &c, 
Gents: In answer to your favor by Mr. Mumford, I have to in- 
form you that the Clergy of Connecticut, in convention assembled, 
agreed to recognise, accept and receive Dr. Seabury as their Bishop, 
and promised to render him that respect, duty and submission which, 
as they understand, were given by the Presbyters to their Bishops 
in the primitive Church when unconnected with, and uncontrolled 



174 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

by, secular power. After which a convention assembled, a com- 
mittee was chosen to attend the Bishop and wish him to propose 
such alterations in the liturgy as sh'd be thought expedient for the 
present, to be laid before the convention at New Haven next month ; 
which alterations I am requested to propose to the Churches in this 
and your State, to see if they will unite with the Churches in Con- 
necticut in promoting a uniformity of worship. The grand object 
of the proposed convention will be, to see if we shall join with Con- 
necticut and receive their Bishop ; or, whether we shall choose a 
deputy or deputies to attend the general convention at Philadelphia 
in September, or adopt any other measure to continue as one com- 
munion. To this end the convention is called, and it is hoped you 
will send one or more of your members to promote the design. 

I am, Gents, with respect and esteem, your most ob't and very 
humble Serv't, 




vr* 



August 22, 1785. Meeting of the congregation : 
The Wardens laid before the congregation two letters, of the 1 st 
and 15 th instant, from the Rev a Samuel Parker, of Boston, advising 
them, that pursuant to a vote passed at a meeting of the Episcopal 
Clergy of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, held at Boston on the 
8 th day of September last, he, with the Rev d Edw. Bass and Nathan- 
iel Fisher, were appointed a committee to call a convention of the 
Episcopal Churches, in that and the neighboring States, to meet at 
such time and place, as they should judge most necessary and con- 
venient ; and requesting the said Wardens to propose to the Church 



193 Rev. Samuel Parker, D.D., was born in 1744, graduated at Harvard 
College, was ordained by the Bishop of London in 1774, became Rector 
of Trinity Church, Boston, in 1784, was made Bishop of the Eastern Dio- 
cese, September 16, 1804, and died on the 6th of the following Decem- 
ber before he had discharged a single duty of the Episcopal office. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 175 

to chose one or more, of their members, to meet in convention, at 
Boston, Wednesday, the ""' day of September next ; then and there- 
to deliberate upon a plan for maintaining uniformity in divine wor 
ship, and adopting such other measures as may tend to the union 
and prosperity of the Episcopal Churches in the American States. 

The congregation having taken the said letter into consideration, 
and duly weighed the contents of the same, do vote and resolve : that 
they will comply with the request of the said Committee, by sending 
a member to represent this Church ; and do hereby nominate and 
appoint Mr. Bours, and unanimously request him to proceed to 
Boston, and meet in the said convention, with full power and 
authority to join in and agree to, in behalf of this Church, any plan, 
or plans, that maybe adopted at the said convention, or at any other 
that may be judged necessary by the said convention, to be holden 
at a future day, for promoting the interest of the Episcopal Church 
in the United States of America ; reserving to the members of this 
Church the liberty of approving, or disapproving, of any alteration 
that may be made in the form of prayer. 

Voted : that Mr. Bours be paid the expenses of his journey to 
Boston. 

August 28, 1785. Martin Benson 194 was married to Jane Cod- 
dington. 

September 12, 1785. Mr. Bours having reported to the congre- 
gation the proceedings of the convention of clergy and lay depu- 

194 Martin Benson, born at Newport, October 2, 1741, was the son of 
John Benson and Anna Collins (probably a daughter of William Collins), 
his wife. He was engaged in the African trade for many years, and was 
familiarly known as the " Governor of Goree," on which island he resided 
for some time. Having acquired a handsome property, he returned to 
Newport. Subsequently he sailed on another voyage to Africa, and died 
at Goree, December 24, 1811. His wife, who was twenty years younger. 
was the daughter of Capt. John Coddington, and the granddaughter of 
Gov. Joseph Wanton. She died at Newport, December 6, 1836. 



i 7 6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

ties from the several Episcopal churches in the States of Massachu- 
setts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, at Boston, on the 7th day 
of this month, and they having heard read, and duly weighed the 
same, do vote and resolve, that they fully approve of said proceed- 
ings, and do agree to adopt the alterations made in the Liturgy, 
agreeable to the plan proposed. 

Voted : that Mr. Bours be requested to attend the convention, at 
their adjournment, on the 26th day of October, with full power, as 
before, to represent this Church, 

The committee who were appointed at Easter last to lease out the 
estate belonging to the Church, late Mr. Kay's, reported that they 
had agreed with Dr. John Baker, of Philadelphia, to give him a lease 
of the house now improved by Mr. Brinley, with the garden and 
buildings thereon, together with the lot'of land, containing upwards 
of seven acres, lately had of Mr. George Scott, in exchange for the 
same quantity of land, part of said estate, for the term of six years 
from the first day of January next, 1786, and to conclude and end 
on the first day of January, 1792, upon condition that the said Dr. 
Baker pay to the Wardens and Vestry of the Church two hundred 
silver Spanish milled dollars, per annum, for the rent of the same; 
three years' rent being advanced and paid down, and the remainder 
as it becomes due, yearly or half yearly ; the said Baker to return 
and surrender up the said estate to the Church, at the expiration of 
the lease, in as good repair as he received the same. 

The said report is accepted, and the Wardens are desired to give 
a lease accordingly to Doc 1 Baker. 

Decembers, 1785. Robert Nichol Auchmuty 19 ' was married to 
Henrietta Bruce, by Rev. Mr. Badger. 




born in 1758, was the eldest 



J Ci^^\son of Rev. Dr. Auchmuty, of 

pyl/?3*Al7Rfo)^\\ York. He graduated at 

jT Vp<~.]nmhiQ College, and in the 
^"^ Revolution served as a volun- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 177 

In July of this year, 1785, a marble monument 196 was erected to 
the memory of Admiral de Ternay, who, while in command of the 
French fleet in these waters, had died here after a brief illness, De- 
cember 15, 1780, and was buried in the churchyard, with great 
pomp and ceremony. 

Faster Monday, April [6, 1786. Samuel Freebody and Francis 
Malbone, elected Wardens, John Bours, clerk of Vestry; James 
Gibbs, clerk; John Meunscher, organist; Daniel Vernon, sexton. 

teer in the British army. After the death of his first wife, he married 
Henrietta Overing, his first cousin, daughter of John Henry Overing, of 
Newport. He died January 28, 1813. 

Arthur Gates Auchmuty, probably a brother of the elder Judge Am h- 
muty, was buried in Trinity Churchyard, but no stone marks the spot. He 
was married to Ann Dickinson, by Rev. Dr. McSparran, September 3, 1 734. 

196 The monument sent out by order of the French King, was intended 
for the interior of the Church, but as no wall space could be found for it, 
it was set against the exterior wall, in the church-yard, where it was 
gradually falling to decay, when the Marquis de Noailles, then the French 
Minister to the United States, had it repaired, and the Vestry found a 
place for it in the vestibule of the Church, where it is well cared for. it 
was placed there in 1872. It bears the following inscription: 

d. o. M. 

Carolus Ludovicus D'Arsac De Ternay. 

Ordinis S" Hierosolymitani Eques. non dura vota professus, 

a vetere et nobili genere, apud Armoricos (Jriundus. 

unus e Regiarum Classium prcefectis, 

Civis, Miles, Imperator. 

de Rege suo, et Patria, per 42 annos bene meritus, hoc sub marmore 

Jacet. 

KELlCiTfcR AUDAX, 

naves regias, post Croisiacam Cladem, per invios Vicenonle fluvii 

anfractus disjectas, e ccecis voraginibus, improbo labore, 

• anuis 1760, 1 761. 

inter tela postium, 

detrusit, avellit, et stationibus suis restituit incolumes, 

Anno 1762, Terram NovAi\i in America invasit. 

Anno 1772, renunciatus Pra/Etor. 



178 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Vestrymen : Charles Wickham, Stephen Ayrault, John Bours, 
Francis Brinley, Charles Handy, Christopher Champlin, George 
Gibbs, Henry Hunter, Thomas Freebody, Samuel Freebody, John 
Mawdsley, Thomas Wickham, John Malbone, Francis Malbone, 
Benjamin Gardiner, Benjamin Brenton. 

Voted : that the house given by the late William Tate to the poor 
of the Church be inspected. 

Voted : that Mr. Bours be requested to write the chairman of the 



ad regendas Borbonian et Francis Insulas, in Galdias commoda, et 

Colonorum felicitatem perannos Septem, totus incubuit. 

Fcederatis ordinibus, pro libertate dimicautibus. 

A Rege Christianissimo missus subsidio Anno 1780. 

Rhodum Insulam occupavit ; 

Dura ad nova Se accingebat pericula, 

IN HAC URBE. 

inter commilitonum planctess, inter Foederatorum Ordinum lamenta et 

desideria. 

Mortem obiit, gravem bonis omnibus, et luctuosam Suis. 

die 15 a x bri \ M DCC, LXXX, 

natus annos 58. 

Rex Christianissimus Severissimus virtutis judex. 

ut clarissimi Viri memoria posteritati consecretur 

hoc monumentum ponendum jussit. 

M. DCC, LXXX. 

This done, the Marquis de Noailles caused a heavy slab of granite, 
bearing the following inscription, to be placed over the Admiral's grave 
in the churchyard : 

Hoc Sub Lapide 

Anno MDCCCLXXIII Posito Jacet 

Carolos Lvdovicos D'ARSAC DE TERNAY 

AnnoM.DCCLXXX 

Decessos 

Sub Proximo Templi Porticvm Restavratvm Et Protectvm Translatvm 

Est. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. i 79 

convention, to be holden the 26th inst., at Boston, and obtain a copv 
of their proceeding s. 

Voted: that a tax of one guinea on the lower, and half a guinea 
on the gallery pews, be continued for the ensuing year. 

Voted: that Mr. Bonis, Mr. Brinley and Capt. Handy, with the 
Wardens, be a committee to write Bishop Seabury upon the subject 
of obtaining a minister. 

Voted : that the thanks of the congregation be returned to Mr. 
Bours for his past services, and that he be requested to keep them 
together, as he has done, and that he receive at the rate of £30 per 
annum, with the improvement of the parsonage-house, as before. 

Pew No. 13, the property of Thomas Cranston, was sold by him 
to Mr. Christopher Champlin, with the approbation of the Wardens, 
June 29, 1786. 

Meeting of the congregation, July 31, 1786. 

A letter from Bishop Seabury, 197 in answer to one wrote to him 



New London, July 17, 1786. 
Gentlemen : 

It has not been in my power to give an earlier answer to \ our letter 

of April 21". The Convention of the Clergy at Stratford did not break 

up till June 1 2 th and my duties required my absence from home for a 

fortnight after. I had no sooner returned than I was again obliged to 

go to New Haven. And. indeed, it was in this last journey, that I got 

such intelligence as enables me now to write to you with any degree of 

certainty. 

I am much obliged to you, Gentlemen, and to the whole congregation 

of the Church at Newport, for the favorable opinion you entertain of me, 

manifested by your wishing to have me reside with you, and take charge 

ot your Church. However agreeable such an event might be to me, the 

state of Connecticut does not seem to permit it. Since you turned your 

attention towards me, we have lost five clergymen, and I believe shall lose 

the sixth. This makes it a matter of more consequence that I stay with 

them, and endeavor to remedy the inconvenience that must arise on this 

occasion. And. indeed, should I accept your kind invitation, my neces- 



180 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

by the committee appointed for that purpose, on Easter Monday- 
last, being laid before the congregation, it was voted : that the same 
committee be requested to write to the Bishop again, and to the 
Rev d Mr. James Say re, of Fairfield, whom he has recommended as a 
proper person for our minister, and invite Mr. Sayre to come to 
Newport, and officiate in our Church a few Sundays, that the con- 



sary absence from you, would leave your Church unsupplied more fre- 
quently than it ought to be. 

I am, however, very sensible of the necessity there is, that you should 
have a prudent and acceptable clergyman settled among you, that divine 
service may be duly celebrated, and the holy sacraments administered. In 
the present scarcity of clergymen, no great choice can be had ; but there 
is one in this State who is not under any present engagement, and whom 
I think a worthy and prudent man. He has a good understanding, and 
appears to be well acquainted with and fully grounded in the principles 
of our holy religion ; and is firmly attached to our Church in doctrine and 
discipline. I never heard him preach ; but he is esteemed a very good 
preacher by his brethren, and the people to whom he has officiated. He 
reads prayers much to my satisfaction. His voice is strong and, I believe, 
equal to your church, and not disagreeable. His character is irreproach- 
able, and his piety and discretion may be depended on. He is a middle- 
aged man ; is married, and has, I think, three small children, and a most 
amiable woman to his wife. The gentlemen is the Rev. Mr. James Sayre. 
He is at present at Fairfield. I have conversed with him on the subject, 
and, it appears to me, he would be pleased with a settlement at Newport, 
but he has some backwardness in offering himself, or going upon trial. 

I should be perfectly satisfied to have him for my parish minister, and 
I persuade myself, your congregation would be happy in him. It you 
think proper to make any application to him, I shall be happy to promote 
it ; or to assist your endeavors to procure a minister in any other way that 
shall be more agreeable to you. He. as well as I, would be glad to hear 
from you as soon as the importance of the subject will permit, as we 
have a number of vacancies here, and cannot afford to have him long 
idle. I could say nothing to him of the living at Newport, but only that 
I presumed it would be a decent one. 

I ought to inform you that there are three young gentlemen, who, we 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 1S1 

--relation may have an opportunity of hearing him, and if they 
approve of him, to treat upon terms of settlement. 

Mr. Bours having reported to the congregation the resolution of 
the clergy and lay delegates, met in convention on the 2l rt inst. at 
Boston, by adjournment, voted : that the same be approved and 
adopted by our Church. 

August 8, 1/86. Dr. Sylvester Gardiner 19 ' died in his 8oth year, 
and was buried under the Church. 

Sunday, August :;. [786. At a meeting of the congregation 
after divine service, voted: that the Rev. James Sayre, who hath 
performed the services of the Church this day, be accepted and 
settled as our Minister, and that he be paid as a salary £100 ster- 
ling money, per annum, to commence upon his arriving at Newport 



expect, will go into Deacons' orders in September, one only of whom i> 
engaged; but I should imagine that quite a young man would not suil 
you so well. 

Commending yon and your Church to the blessing and protection of 
Almighty God, I beg leave to subscribe myself. Gentlemen, with great 
regard, your most affectionate 

and very humble serv't, 




Messrs. John Bours, Samuel Freebody, Francis Malbone, Fra's Brinley 

and Charles Handy, the Committee of the Congregation of Trinity 
Church, Newport. 

''" Dr. Gardiner was born in South Kingston. He was educated in 
Europe. When he returned to America he settled in Boston, where he 
became eminent as a surgeon, and amassed a fortune. At the opening 
of the Revolution he went to England, where he remained till peace was 
declared. Returning to America, he took up his residence at Newport. 
The funeral was solemnized at the Church, at which time a sermon was 
preached at his own request. Many marks of respect were shown to his 
memory on the dav of the funeral. 



1 82 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

with his family ; that he improve the parsonage-house and lot, and 
be also paid the expenses of his present journey to Newport, and of 
the removal of his family; and that Col. Malbone, Mr. Champlin, 
Mr. Gibbs and Mr. Brinley, with the Wardens, 199 be a committee to 
wait upon Mr. Sayre, and inform him of the resolution of the con- 
gregation, and report his answer. 

Voted : that Mr. Bours be requested to officiate until the arrival 
of Mr. Sayre. 

October i, 1786. Whereas, the Rev. Mr. Sayre hath this day 
arrived from Fairfield, with his family, and taken charge of our 
Church, voted: that a sum sufficient to defray the expenses of his 



199 Newport, August 2d, 1786. 

Rev. Sir: 

The Right Rev. Bishop Seabury, having, in consequence of an applica- 
tion made to him by the congregation of Trinity Church, in this city, to 
become their Rector himself, or to recommend a proper person to them, 
mentioned you as well qualified in all respects to undertake the impor- 
tant charge. At a meeting of the Church on Monday last, a unanimous 
vote was passed empowering and requesting us to write you upon the sub- 
ject, and to propose to you the taking a ride to Newport and officiating a 
few Sundays, that the congregation may have an opportunity of hearing 
you and making proposals for a settlement. 

We would just observe that we gave our late Minister, the Rev. Mr. 
Bisset, ^100 sterling, per annum, and the improvement of a house and 
garden. We cannot promise more than that sum at this time, when this 
city is laboring under some peculiar difficulties, but so far we may possibly 
go again with proper exertions. 

We shall be glad to hear from, or see you, as soon as convenient, and 
are very respectfully, 

Rev d . Sir, 

Your most Obed Servts, 

Rev. Mr. James Sayre. 

The above is from an unsigned copy of the letter, in the hand-writing 
of John Bours. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 183 

removal, together with his late journey to Newport, be collected by 
subscription, and paid him by the Wardens. 

Voted: that Mr. Say re be requested to notify the congregation 
to meet after divine worship on Sunday next, that they may be de- 
sired to pay the taxes of the pews by the possessors of them ; by 
putting the same into the box on the Sunday, marked with the name 
of the proprietor, or occupier, or number of the pew, so that the War- 
dens may give credit for the same. 

Voted : that the lease given to Dr. Baker be for eight year-. 

October 8, 1786. The congregation, having a grateful sense of 
the services rendered to the Church by Mr. Bours, in his officiating 
for them for the last five years, as a lay reader, do unanimously vote 
him their sincere thanks. 

Entered by order of the congregation, 

Fras Malbone, Warden. 200 

Easter Monday. April 9, 1787. Samuel Freebody and Francis 
Malbone were elected Church Wardens ; John Bours, clerk of the 
Vestry ; James Gibbs, clerk ; John Meunscher, organist ; Daniel 
Vernon, sexton. 

Voted : that the sexton's salary be augmented to thirty dollars 
per annum. 

Whereas, the shutting up of the aisles, at the west end of the 
Church, is found to be very inconvenient to several of the congrega- 
tion, voted ; that the same be laid open, and that the proprietors of 
the four pews built therein be accommodated with pews by the 
Church, whenever they apply for that purpose. 

Voted : that the thanks of the congregation be presented by the 



'"" Mr. Bours, who kept the records of the Church, was naturally disin- 
clined to make this tntry himself, and the duty was assigned to the 
Warden. 



1 84 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Wardens to Mrs. Jonas Redwood, 201 for her present of a large 
prayer-book to the Church. 

September 4, 1787. Voted: that the Rev. Mr. Sayre 202 be re- 
quested to give notice to the congregation, that as provision is made 
by the Vestry, for the schooling of ten poor boys, upon Mr. Kay's 
donation, they are desired to make return to him of such names as 

m Tt does not appear whether this was the wife of Jonas Langford Red- 
wood, second son of Abraham, or of his son of the same name. The first 
married Abigail Godfrey, of Newport, and the latter married a Miss Hol- 
man, of Virginia. 
202 v* This was the last meeting of the Vestry 

/Qts9yiJ& *MZaJ4~& at wmcn ^ ev - ^ r - Sayre was present, 
^/ /j I and the marriage ceremonies, from this 

U date to the close of Mr. Sayre's connec- 

tion with the Church, were performed by Rev. William Smith, of St. 
Paul's, Narragansett, to which place persons wishing to be united went for 
that purpose. There was trouble in the Church, and the breach between 
the minister and the congregation was not closed till the Rev. Mr. Sayre's 
connection with the Church was severed. While he was cordially received 
at the outset, there seems to have been a want of harmony in the Church 
soon after his entering upon his duties. There was probably blame on both 
sides. Mr. Sayre was far from conciliatory (was often arbitrary), and the 
congregation, frustrated in some of their designs, particularly in their wish 
to enter into cordial relations with some of the churches of the neighboring 
States, were severe in their remarks against him. They charged him with 
' ' refusing to put a vote in the Vestry which he had previously agreed to do.' ' 
They apprehended, from conversation had with him, " that he would never 
be brought to conform to any form which might be agreed upon for the 
establishment of union in the Episcopal Church of America, and which was 
then supposed to be in agitation, if it differed in any manner from the forms 
of England, excepting the prayer for the King." That on being asked " if 
the Church in Pennsylvania had been consecrated, he replied that there 
were no churchmen there," etc. 

To make matters worse, the controversy got into print, and letter fol- 
lowed letter in the newspapers of the day. Then a pamphlet was put into 
circulation by Mr. Sayre, and was answered by Mr. Bours (who was the 
leader of the opposition), as he had answered some of his letters. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 1S5 

are proper objects of that charity, to be laid before the Vestry at 
their next meeting. 

Voted : that the Vestry meet on the first Monday of every month, 
at 10 o'clock, A.M., at the parsonage. 



It was represented to Mr. Bours at this stage that if he would retire from 
his offices, as Vestryman and Clerk of the Vestry, peace would probably be 
restored. To bring about this result, Mr. Bours sent in the following 

letter: 

Newport, April 10, iySq. 

Gentlemen : Having been informed that an objection is raised by some 
persons unfriendly to me, that my holding the office of Clerk, and being a 
member of the Vestry, is an obstacle to the re-establishment of p< are and 
harmony in the congregation, and having the true interest of the Church at 
heart, I had long since determined that every consideration, on my part, 
should give way to any object so desirable, and therefore beg leave to assure 
you that I do, with the greatest cheerfulness, resign both these offices, sin- 
cerely wishing that it may answer the end proposed, and am, with senti- 
ments of regard, 

Gentlemen, your most obed* Servant, 

J. Bours. 
The Gentlemen, Wardens and Vestry and Congregation of Trinity 
Church, Newport, 

But the breach was now far too wide to be closed easily, and the congre- 
gation, in a letter to Mr. Sayre, thus addressed him : 

" Reverend Sir : The two last meetings of the Vestry, having ended only 
in an adjournment, and the disagreeable consequences that must attend 
the continuance of the present division in our Church have induced a free 
conversation among us, the result of which we beg leave, briefly, to com- 
municate to you. 

" It was once the hope and expectation of us all, that under your minis- 
try we should be happy and united ; but being unfortunately disappointed 
in that hope, and seeing no prospect of the wished for happiness, either to 
you or us, and flattering ourselves that your sentiments and the religion 
you profess, will not permit you to obstruct our happiness, especially 
where you cannot yourself, in our opinion, expect to enjoy any by remain- 
ing longer our minister, we also wishing to continue on the same friendly 

13 



1 86 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

October I, 1787. Voted by the congregation, that Mr. Stephen 
De Blois be a vestryman in the room of Mr. Charles Wickham, 
deceased. 

Voted : that .£10 sterling be added to the Rev. Mr. Sayre's salary 
for the year ensuing. 

Voted : that the Wardens have a floor laid over the ceiling of the 
new part of the Church as soon as possible. 



and neighborly terms we have been on with each other ; for these con- 
siderations, and others unnecessary to mention, we are induced to wish 
that you could so far join in opinion with us, as to be willing to fix a time 
for putting an end to your ministry here. And as we do not desire that 
you should suffer any inconvenience by a sudden removal, if it should be 
more agreeable to you to remain till Easter next, we shall freely agree to 
it, and shall be happy, if every disagreeable circumstance that has lately 
taken place among us, may be buried in oblivion, if that is as much your 
wish as ours." 

The above is from a draft of a letter, and is without date ; if answered, the 
answer has been lost . 

The appeal to Rev. Mr. Sayre not meeting with a favorable response, a 
letter was addressed to Bishop Seabury, as appears by a draft, also with- 
out date. 

" As the Reverend Mr. Sayre was introduced here, and cordially received 
as Minister of Trinity Church, on your recommendation, he then being 
an entire stranger, and, as we believe, that many parts of his character 
were then unknown to you ; ' though few of us have the honor of a per- 
sonal acquaintance with you, yet from the circumstances just mentioned, 
and from our knowledge of your rank in the Church, and of the character 
you sustain, we beg leave to lay before you the enclosed state of the dis- 
pute at present subsisting between Mr. Sayre and a part of the congregation, 
and of our firm purpose in consequence of it, omitting the breach between 
him and Mr. Bours, of which we suppose you are already perfectly 
informed. 

" We declare to you, Sir, that we have used all the means in our power, 
to prevail on Mr. Sayre to leave us, without coming to an open rupture ; 
in confirmation of which we take the liberty also, to enclose a copy of an 
address, which was delivered to him after he refused to put a vote to the 



XEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 1S7 

November 5, [787. Voted : that the sexton be directed by the 
Wardens to go to all the owners and occupiers of pews, and inform 
them that they are earnestly requested to put the tax on their pews 
into the box, on the Sunday, to prevent great and unnecessary 
trouble to the Wardens. 

Easter Monday, March 31, 17XS. Samuel Freebody and John 
Hand)- were elected Church Wardens; John Hours, Clerk of the 
Vestry; James Gibbs, Clerk; John Meunscher, organist; Daniel 
Vernon, sexton. 

Voted, by the Vestry : that the necessary fencing be made by the 
Wardens on the lot improved by the organist, late the estate of Wil- 
liam Tate, deceased. 

August 6, 1788. Edward Mumford was chosen one of the Vestry, 
in the room of George Wright, deceased. 

Easter Monday, April 13, 1789. John Handy and Robert N, 
Auchmuty were chosen Church Wardens ; Robert N. Auchmuty, 
Clerk of the Vestry ; James Gibbs, Clerk ; and John Meunscher, 
organist, with the same salary that he had last year ; Daniel Vernon, 
sexton. Peter Mumford was elected a Vestryman in place of John 
Bours. 

Voted : that no records of the proceedings of the congregation 
shall be shown, or copies of them be given to any person, without 
the consent of the Wardens and Vestry. 

Voted: that the new form of worship recommended by the con- 



Vestry, which he had previously engaged to do ; to which he has not 
condescended to return an answer. 

'• Respect to you, Sir, and to your recommendation, and the hope that, 
after perusal of the enclosed papers, you will be convinced that it will be 
for the peace and quiet of the Church, as well as of society, that Mr. 
Sayre should retire, are the causes of this address ; and we shall suspend 
the publication until an opportunity offers of hearing from you, and shall 
be very happy to be enabled by your mediation to suppress it ; as an appeal 
to the public, on this occasion, has ever been disagreeable to us." 



1 88 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

vention at Boston, and adopted by the congregation the 31st of July, 
1786, be discontinued, and that the service be performed in the 
manner that it was prior to that vote. 

A separation was probably brought about through the mediation 
of Bishop Seabury, and Mr. Sayre was found a parish at Stratford, 
Ct. There he published : 

" A Candid Narrative of certain matters relating to Trinity 
Church in Newport, In the State of Rhode Island, By James Sayre, 
A.M., late Minister of said Church ; With a view of correcting the 
egregious misrepresentations of Mr. John Bours, contained in a let- 
ter addressed to the Author, in the Newport Herald of October 9 th , 
1788. Fairfield. Printed by Forgue & Bulkeley, 1788. Audi et 
Alteram Partem." 

He also furnished for the press the copy of 

" An Address Presented to the Rev. James Sayre, A.M., Minister 

» 
of Trinity Church, Newport, Previous to his leaving this Town ; 

together with his Answer, After his Arrival at Fairfield, in Con- 
necticut. Published by Request of a Number of Subscribers to the 
Address. Newport (R. I.) Printed by Henry Barber, 1789." 203 

Voted : that Messrs. Charles Handy, Mr. Wickham, Mr. Mum- 
ford and Mr. Auchmuty be a committee to converse with Mr. 



' The " address " was printed by Peter Edes, at the office of the New- 
port Herald, and bore this title : 

" An Appeal to the Public ; in which the Misrepresentations and 
Calumnies contained in a Pamphlet entitled ' A Narrative on Certain 
Matters Relative to Trinity Church, in Newport, in the State of Rhode 
Island,' by a very extraordinary man, the Rev. James Sayre, A.M. , late 
Minister of said Church, arc pointed out and his very strange conduct 
during the time of his ministration at Newport, faithfully related. By 
John Bours, Merchant, and one of the Vestry of said Church." 

"Iluiiiu and shame from no condition rise. 

Act well your part, there all the honor lies," 
" Worth makes the man, and want of it his fellow, 

The rest is all but leather 01 Prunella." — (Tope.) 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 189 

Smith, and learn if he has any objection to conforming to the cus- 
toms and service of our Church. 

April 2j, 1789. Meeting of the congregation. The report of the 
committee appointed at the last meeting to wait on the Rev. Mr. 
Smith, being received, it was voted : that the same committee be 
continued and requested to converse further with Mr. Smith on the 
same subject. 

The exact date of the retirement of Rev. Mr. Sayre cannot now be 
fixed, but it occurred some time in the winter of 1 788-89. In April, 1 789, 
the congregation had under consideration the calling of Rev. William 
Smith, then settled in Narragansett, as Rector of the Church. Of the 
subsequent career of Rev. Mr. Sayre we have a brief outline in Hitch- 
cock's History of the Church in Woodbury \ 

"At the convocation assembled at Litchfield, June 2 d , 1790, a vote 
was taken on the adoption, or, rather, approval, of the General Conven 
tion at Philadelphia, October > d , 1789. It was decided in the affirmative, 
everyone of the fifteen clergymen present voting in favor of it, but the Rev. 
James Sayre, who entered his protest against the proceedings, and desired 
that it be recorded. The next day he withdrew from the convocation. 
He accompanied his opposition to the new prayer-book, and the General 
Constitution, with bitterness of feeling and personal abuse — the traiti of 
character which he had shown at Newport, Rhode Island, where the dis- 
pleasure of a divided parish fell upon him before he came to Connecticut. 
Speed} efforts weie made by the Bishop and Clergy to neutralize his in- 
fluence, and bring the people under his care into harmonious action with 
the Diocese. 

"At a Convocation in East Haddarn, February 15, 1792, this per- 
emptory vote was passed: That unless the Wardens and Vestrymen in 
Christ Church, in Stratford, shall transmit to the Rt. Rev., the Bishop of 
Connecticut, within fourteen days after Easter Monday next, a notifica- 
tion that the congregation of said Church have adopted the Constitution 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church, as settled by the General Convention, 
at Philadelphia, in October, 1789, they (the congregation; will be con- 
sidered as having totally separated themselves from the Church in Con- 
necticut. The controversy was bitter and Mr. Sayre finally withdrew from 
his parish at Stratford, and took charge of a church at Woodbury, but 
with no happier results. His mind was diseased, a fact hitherto unknown, 
and actual insanity terminated his life, in 1798." 



i 9 o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



CHAPTER XII. 
1789-1 790. 

May 25, 1789. Voted, at a meeting of the congregation: that 
Mr. Christopher Champlin and the Wardens be a committee to write 
to the Rev. Mr. Smith, and request him to visit us every other week 
tor the present ; and likewise to write to the Wardens, Vestry and 
congregation of St. Paul's Church, Narragansett, to know if they 
have any objection to his conforming to our desire. 2 " 4 

Voted : that the same committee provide decent lodgings for Mr. 
Smith, should he accept our invitation. 

Voted : that the Wardens, Mr. Champlin, Mr. Handy, Mr. Gibbs, 
Mr. Wickham, Mr. Gardiner and Mr. Peter Mumford, be a com- 
mittee to inquire after and endeavor to find out a clergyman that 
may be agreeable to the congregation. 

Voted : that a notification be put in each pew requesting the con- 
gregation to contribute every Sunday, as much as their situation 
will permit, for the payment of Mr. Smith, the other officers, and 
unavoidable expenses of the Church. 

June 15, 1789. The committee appointed to write to the Rev. Mr. 
Smith, and the congregation of St. Paul's Church, Narragansett, 
having reported that the Rev. Mr. Smith, and the congregation at 
Narragansett, had consented to comply with their request, it was 



204 Rev. Mr. Smith had, for some time, been in the habit of occasionally 
visiting the Church and preaching. In March, 1789, Mrs. Ann Baker, wife 
of John Baker, of this town, died, and was buried under the Church, at 
which time a sermon was preached by Mr. Smith. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 191 

voted : that the same committee write to the congregation at Nar- 
ragansett, and return them thanks for their kindness. 

September 10, 1789. A notification having been received from 
the Rev. Mr. Parker, of Boston, that the convention lately held at 
the city of Philadelphia, and adjourned to the 29th of this month, 
had expressed a desire that this Church should be there represented, 
it was thereupon ordered, that the'Wardens request the Rev. Mr. 
Smith to notify a meeting of the congregation, at the Church, imme- 
diately after divine service, next Sunday, in the afternoon. 

Voted: that the Wardens, Mr. F. Brinley, Mr. C. Handy and Mr. 
D. Wickham, be a committee to draw up such papers as they may 
think necessary to lay before the congregation. 

September 13, 1789. At a meeting of the Wardens, Vestry and 
congregation of Trinity Church, in Newport, in the State of Rhode 
Island, immediately after divine service, it was voted unanimousK ; 
that this congregation will, for the future, abide by and maintain 
such rules and orders, respecting both the doctrine and discipline of 
our Church as has been determined upon by the General "Conven- 
tion, held in the city of Philadelphia, from the 28th of Jul)' to the 8th 
ot August last, or which may be determined upon by the conven- 
tion which is to be held by adjournment, in Philadelphia, the 29th 
of the present month ; and that we will apply to some gentleman to 
represent us in the said convention. 

Voted: that the Rev. Samuel Parker, D.D., be requested to rep- 
resent us in the said convention, and that the Wardens, Messrs. 
Brinley, Wickham and DeBlois, be a committee to write to him on 
the subjec 1 



206 The committee immediately wrote to Rev. Dr. Parker: 
" Rev d Sir. The extract of the letter from the committee of the conven- 
tion to the clergy of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, which you fav'ored 
us with, was immediately laid before the Wardens and Vestry of our Church, 
and as it was of great moment, the congregation was summoned to meet in 



1 9 2 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

December 26, 1789. Voted : that the congregation be desired to 
meet in the Church, on Sunday next, immediately after divine ser- 
vice, for the express purpose of choosing a Minister. 

December 28, 1789. Voted: that every person who regularly 
pays his pew tax shall have a right to vote in the choice of a 
Minister. 

Voted : that the Wardens, Mr. Brinley, Mr. Champlin, Mr. Gibbs, 
Mr. Wickham, and Mr. De Blois, be a committee to wait on the 
Rev. Mr. William Smith, 206 inform him that we have this day chosen 

the Church after divine service, last Sunday, in the afternoon, to take it into 
consideration. Having likewise read the Journal of the convention and 
duly considered the canons and general constitution, we were appointed a 
committee, not only to thank you for your communication, but to request 
of you, as we, unhappily, are at present without a Rector, to represent 
our Church at the adjourned convention, which is to be held in the city 
of Philadelphia the 29 th of this month ; and we likewise enclose you a 
vote of the congregation, which we hope will be sufficient to convince that 
respectable body of our determination to abide by any rules or orders that 
may be formed by them, respecting both the doctrine and discipline of 
the Episcopal Church in the United States. 

We are sorry that from the shortness of time we have not been able to 
consult our sister churches in this State, and form a convention ; but as 
by the fifth article of the General Constitution every church may be 
represented that shall accede to it, we flatter ourselves that your 
appearing in our behalf at the adjournment of the Convention will be 
sufficient. 

Although we do not presume to dictate, yet we are desired to express 
a hope that the alterations [in the prayer-book] may be as few as possible. 

If we were not fully sensible of your zeal for the Church in general, we 
should think it necessary to apologize to you for the trouble we give you. 

" W V^"// J? ' ./<* ^" tv " William Smith was born in 

^/c/tC^Oyr^ x^fiy^s/X— vj C otland, where he was educated, 
studied for the university, and was ordained. He came to America. 
His first parish was in Maryland, but he did not remain there long, for 
in July, 1787, he was in charge of St. Paul's, Narragansett, where he was 
settled at the time that he was called to Trinity Church, and remained here 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 193 

him for our Minister, and request his acceptance of the office, and 
that the said committee offer him such a salary as they may think, 
from the present situation of our Church, we may be able to 
punctually pay. 

February 25, 1790. At a meeting of the congregation, voted : 
that provision be made for schooling ten poor children, agreeable 
to Mr. Kay's will, as soon as possible. 

Voted : that Mr. Gibbs, Mr. Brinley and Mr. Wickham be a com 
mittee to seek for some person, qualified as the will directs, to edu- 
cate them. 

Voted: that the Rev. Mr. Smith be appointed and requested to 
undertake the education of the said children for the present ; and 
that public notice be given next Sunday for all persons who have 
children entitled to the benefit of the said donation, to send in their 
names and ages to the Rector, prior to Easter next, that the Vestry 
may select those that are proper objects of charity. 

Easter Monday, April 5, 1790. The officers of the Church then 
holding office were all re-elected. 

October 10, 1790. Voted: that notice be given to the congrega- 
tion to meet next Sunday, after divine service in the Church, to take 



till April 12, 1797. He was a man of learning, and was gifted in many ways; 
but, unfortunately, he had an infirmity of temper, which frequently brought 
him into trouble. Rev. Salmon Wheaton, D.D., is quoted in Ross's 
Century Sermon, as saying: "Had Mr. Smith's prudence been equal to 
his talents and learning, he might, with the Divine blessing, have been in- 
strumental in healing the unhappy divisions among his people and restor- 
ing the Church to its former prosperity." And the Rev. Mr. Beardsley 
said of him, in an historical discourse: " He possessed a singular ver- 
satility of talents, and was both a theologian and a scholar, a composer 
of church music, and a constructor of church organs ; and but for the 
peculiarity of his temperament, and the infirmity of his constitution, he 
might have been more useful in his day and generation." He died in 
New York, April 6, 1 821, in his 69th year. 



i 9 4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

into consideration the proceedings of the late General Convention, 
to consider of the propriety of writing to our sister churches in this 
State, for the purpose of meeting in a State Convention, and for 
such other matters as shall then be thought proper to lay before 
them. 

October 17, 1790. Meeting of the congregation. Voted: that 
the congregation write to the sister churches in this State, request- 
ing them to meet us in Convention at this place, as soon as conve- 
niently may be, agreeable to the resolve of the last General Conven- 
tion, held in Philadelphia, September 29, 1790. 

Voted : that the Rev. Mr. Smith and the Wardens be a commit- 
tee to write to our sister churches, and to represent us in Conven- 
tion. 

Voted: that the Revised Book of Common Prayer be used by 
this congregation as soon as the)- can be procured ; previous notice 
of one Sunday being given. 

. November 21, 1790. The delegates appointed on the 17th of 
October, to represent us in Convention, having reported that they 
had met the churches of Providence and Bristol in Convention, and 
having furnished the Vestry with a copy of their proceedings, it was 
voted : that the Rev. Mr. Smith be requested to give notice next 
Sunday forenoon, in church, that the congregation are desired to 
remain in the church in the afternoon, after divine service, to take 
the same into consideration. 

November 23, 1790. At a meeting of the congregation it was 
unanimously resolved, that the thanks of this congregation be given 
to the Rev. Mr. Smith, John Handy and R. N. Auchmuty, our del- 
egates to the late Convention ; and the Clerk of the Vestry is de- 
sired to insert the whole of the proceedings on the records of this 
Church, as a testimony of our approbation. 

"At a Convention held in Newport, November 18, 1790, 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 195 

"The Churches of Newport, Providence and Bristol in represen- 
tation : 

"Newport: represented by the Rev. William Smith, Rector of 
Trinity Church. 

" Lay delegates: John Handy"' 7 and Robt. N. Auchmut) . 

"Providence : The Rev. Moses Badger, Rector of King's Church 

" Lay delegates: Jera F. Jenkins, John Mumford. 

" Bristol : John Usher, Lay delegate from St. Michael's. 

" After authoritative testimonials from the different representatives 
and approved of, the Rev. Moses Badger was chosen President, and 
Robt. N. Auchmuty, Secretary. 

" After having read and duly considered the seventeen canons 
adopted by the General Convention, held in the city of Philadelphia, 
from the 29th of September to the 1 6th of October, 1789, it was 
unanimously 

" Voted: that this Convention will adhere to and obey the above 
mentioned canons, and recommend to their Standing Committee 
the strict observance of them. 

" Voted : that the following be added as an addition to the sixth 
canon, to be observed in this State : 

"' That no person shall be received by the Standing Committee of 
the Church in this State, as a candidate for Holy Orders, unless he 
shall produce testimonials that he hath been a regular communi- 



Major John Handy was one 
of many patriots in the Rev- 
olution, who sacrificed pri- 
vate interest to the public- 
good. In the effort to drive 
the British from Rhode isl- 
and, he served under Sullivan and Spencer. On the Fourth of July, 
1776, he read the Declaration of Independence from the steps of the 
Court House in Newport ; and fifty years from that day he read it again, 
July 4, ic'26, from the same place. Major Hand), who was the eldest 
son of Captain Charles Hands, died March 2, 1828, aged 72 years. His 
widow, who was Frances Stewart, of New London, attained to the age of 
92 years, and died March 8, 1854. 




i 9 6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

cant for the two years last past, certified by two clergymen, with 
one or both of whom he has communicated; or, by three or more 
other communicants, in case of the vacancy of the Church or 
Churches of which the candidate is a member.' 

" Voted : that this Convention approve of and will recommend to 
their respective Churches the use of the revised Book of Common 
Prayer, adopted by the late General Convention. 

"Voted: by this Convention, that the Churches in this State be 
immediately united under a bishop. 

" Voted : that the Right Rev. Father in God, Samuel Seabury, 
D.D., Bishop of the Church in Connecticut, be, and he is hereby 
declared the Bishop of the Church in this State. That the Rev. 
Moses Badger and William Smith be requested to write to and 
address him on the subject, and that the letter of recognition and 
Episcopal acceptance, be entered upon the journals of this Conven- 
tion ; and, further, that copies of the said letters be transmitted to 
the respective Churches of this State, to be entered on their records. 

" Voted : that the Rev. Mr. Badger, the Rev. Mr. Smith, and Mr. 
John Usher, be the Standing Committee of this Convention. 

" Voted : that the Rev. Mr. Smith 208 be requested to write to the 

306 The following is a copy of the letter addressed to Bishop Seabury : 

Right Honored Father in God. 

Appointed by an Ecclesiastical Convention, held in this place, 
the 1 8 th ult., wherein Trinity Church, in Newport, King's Church, in 
Providence, and St. Michael's Church, in Bristol, were duly represented, 
as from minutes of the Convention, herewith transmitted, will appear, we 
take the earliest opportunity of addressing your Reverence. 

Confiding in your moderation and prudence, and beholding the decency 
and propriety with which you conduct your Episcopal administration in 
your diocese of Connecticut, as also esteeming you an able defender, as 
well an avowed patron and propagator of Apostolic faith and practice, the 
aforesaid Convention has nominated and unanimously voted your Rev- 
erence, the Bishop and Ecclesiastical Superior of the Churches so repre- 
sented ; and of such others in this State as may in future accede to and 
become parts of the established Episcopacy of the United States ; and in 
consideration of the many advantages which will naturally result from 
your supenntendance, as well as to manifest our desire to promote and 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 1^7 

Churches of Bristol and Narragansett, representing to them the dis- 
advantages resulting from the want of a regular ordained minister. 

" Voted : that the thanks of this Convention be given to the Rev. 
Mr. Smith, for his excellent discourse, delivered this day. and that 
he be requested to furnish us with a copy for the press. ?w 

"The Convention adjourned sine die." 



strengthen the unit) of Christ's Apostolic Church, as far as in us lieth, 

the aforesaid Chun lies promise to pay to your Reverence all due and 
Christian respect and canonical obedience. 

And our prayers to God are, that the most perfect unity may pervade all 
the Churches in those States, that the God and Father of our Lord 
Tesus Christ, who brought again from the dead that great Shepherd of the 
sheep, the Supreme Bishop of our souls, and head of his Church, may 
shed abroad more and more of his divine light and love upon our Episco- 
pacy and Priesthood, and on all the Churches of our communion ; that 
every one in his several vocations and ministry, may by a life of Faith 
upon, and obedience to, the Son of God, glorify him in " time, and be 
numbered with the Saints of the most High," when time shall be no 
more. 

With the most affectionate regard for your person and family, and 
praying with all fervency that the pleasure of the Lord may prosper in your 
hands : 

We have the honor and felicity to be. 

Right Reverend Father in God. 

vour Reverence's 
Most Obedient and Very Hum ble Serv* 
Will. Smith. 
Rec* of Trinity Ch., Newport. 
M. Badger. 
Rector of King's Church, Providence. 
Newport, 2o tb Nov., 1790. 

The Right Rev d Father in God, Samuel, by Divine Providence Bishop of 
the Church in Connecticut. 

209 The sermon was printed, with the following title : 

\ Discourse at the Opening of the Convention of Clerical and Lay 
Delegates of the Church, in the State of Rhode Island, delivered in Trinity 
Church, Newport, Thursday, the 18 th of November, 1790. Psalm exxii., 
7-9. By William Smith, A.M., Rector of Trinity Church, Newport." 



198 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



CHAPTER XIII. 

1790-1797. 

At a meeting of the congregation of Trinity Church, on Sunday, 
December 9, 1790, a letter from the Right Rev d Samuel Seabury, 
in answer to the letter of the convention, being received and read, 
was ordered first to be copied on the records, and then filed among- 
the papers of the Church. 

New London, Decb. 1, 1790, 
Reverend Gentlemen : 

Your letter of the 20 th of November came to me in due time. 
I feel myself much obliged by the confidence the Ecclesiastical 
Convention held at Newport, the 1 8 th of the last month, have placed 
in me ; and by the manner you, gentlemen, have notified me that 
that convention had " nominated and unanimously voted " me the 
Bishop and Ecclesiastical Superior of Trinity Church, in Newport, 
of King's Church, in Providence, and of St. Michael's Church, in 
Bristol and of such other churches in the State of Rhode Island 
" as may in future accede to and become parts of the established 
Episcopacy of the United States." 

Had I a high opinion of my own abilities, it is probable I should 
accept this instance of the good opinion your convention are pleased 
to entertain of me, with more confidence ; next, however, to doing 
as well as we wish, is to do as well as we can. 

Confiding then in the assistance and protection of Almighty God, 
and hoping, gentlemen, for your advice and support, and for the 
support of all good men, I do, in the fear of God, and under a sense 
of duty to the great Redeemer and Head of the Church, accept the 
charge your convention have thought proper to commit to me ; 
and will exert my best efforts that their expectations from me may 
not be entirely disappointed. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 199 

By the divine permission I will visit your churches as soon as the 
spring season shall permit, and hope then for a happy opportunity 
of personally settling with you such matters as may be thought 
necessary or useful to their general interest. 

I most heartily join in your devout prayers for the unity a\m\ 
prosperity of the church in the United States. May it ever continue 
a sound and flourishing part of the Catholic Church of Christ. 

Commending you and your Churches to the blessing and protec- 
tion of Almighty Cod ; requesting your prayers for me to the same 
all-sufficient Being, by whose power the weakest abilities are some- 
times made the instrument of his glory, and of prosperity to His 
Church, I remain, Reverend Gentlemen, your affectionate Brother 
and very humble servant, 

Samuel Bp., Connect. 

February 4, t 79 1 . Voted: that the Rector is desired to request 
the attendance of the congregation in the Church on Sunday next, 
after Divine Service, to consider of the expediency of applying to 
the Hon'ble General Assembly, for liberty to raise a sum of money 
by lottery, sufficient to pay the debts and to repair the Church ; 
which proposition was unanimously agreed to by the congregation 
the following Sunday, and the Wardens, with Messrs. Gibbs, Wick- 
ham, Mumford, and Crooke as managers.-"' 

Easter Monday, April 5, 1791. The officers of the Church were 
re-elected. 

[June 27, 1 79 1, St. John's day. A discourse was delivered in the 



10 The right to have such a lottery was granted, and Man h 12th the 
scheme was offered to the public. Five thousand tickets were put upon 
the market, at two dollars each. The prizes, 1701 in all, ran from one of 
$Tooo,down to 1598 at four dollars each, subject to a deduction of fifteen 
per cent. 

In a note appended to the printed scheme, the managers stated that 
" from the encouragement they have already met with, they are determined 
to draw the lottery by the last of May." (See page 200.) 



2oo ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Newport: Trinity Church LOTTERY. 

THE General AfTembly, at their laft Sefljons, having 
granted Permiffion to the Congregation of Trinity 
Church, in Newport, to raife by Lottery, the Sum of Fif- 
teen Hundred Dollars, to difcharge the Debts they unavoid- 
ably contracted during the War, and to repair the Church 
and Lane, commonly called Church Lane, the Subfcribers 
(who have given Bond to the General Treafurer) beg Leave 
to prefent the following Scheme for the Patronage of the 
Public. 



s 


c 




H 


E 




M 




E. 


N O 1 T W 





B 


L A N K 


s 


T 





A 


PRIZE. 


Prizes 






Del/nrj 










VtUars 


l 


of 




1000 






IS 




1000 


1 






500 










500 


a 






200 










400 


5 






1 bo 










qoo 


7 
4 






50 

3° 
20 










15° 

1 10 

soo 


»5 

20 

*55>8 






10 

8 
6 

4 










'5° 
160 

228 
6392 


1701 Prizes. 
3299 Blanks. 
















10000 



5000 Tickets at s Dollars. 

Subjcfl to a Dedufiion of Fifteen per Cent. 

*,,* Tickets may be had of the Managers, who will pay 
the Prizes on Demand, and who, from the Encouragement 
they have already met with, are determined to draw the Lot- 
tery by the lafl of May. 

GEORGE GIBBS, 
THOMAS W1CKHAM, 
EDWARD MUMFORD, 
JOHN HANDY, 
ROBERT N. AUCHMl'TY, 
WILLIAM CROOKE, 
NEWPORT. March >5, 1791. 



• Managers, 



NEWPORT, RHODF. TSLAXD. 201 

Church before the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of 
the State of Rhode Island, by the Rector, Rev. William Smith, from 
tin text : " He who built all things is God." Christopher Champlin 
was that year installed First Grand Master. The same day George 
Gibbs, Benjamin Bourne and Robert N. Auchmuty were appointed 
a committee of the Grand Lodge to wait on the Rev. Mr. Smith, 
with the thanks of the fraternity for his discourse, and ask for a copy 
for the press. 

The discourse was printed in Providence by Bennett Wheeler.] 

February 2, 1792. Voted: that Mr. Champlin and Mr. Brinley 
be a committee to view the school-house lot, and the lot proposed 
for an exchange by Mr. Channing, and to report on the expediency 
thereof. 

February 6, 1792. Voted: that Mr. Christopher Champlin and 
Mr. Wickham be a committee to converse with Mr. Tilley respect- 
ing the sum he will give annually for the lot on which his [rope] 
walk stands, and that the Wardens be authorized to grant him a 
lease for a term of years, not exceeding seven, on such terms as said 
committee shall agree with him." 11 

Voted: that Mr. Champlin and Mr. Wickham be a committee to 
consult with Mr. Meunscher respecting the repairs that are wanting 
in the house he occupies ; that they inquire into the grievances he 
complains of, and that they inform themselves what Mr. Carr will 
demand for a passage-way to the well of water, and report to the 
next meeting." 12 



211 The rope-walk stood on land acquired of George Scott in exchange 
for some of the Kay land : which negotiation is referred to under date of 
May 2, 1785. It had its eastern bounds 011 the Jewish cemetery, and made 
a part of what is now Kay Street. The remains of the rope-walk that 
stood there were burnt by some mischievous person during the excitement 
of the Dorr rebellion, in 1.842. 

The hou>e occupied by Meunscher was a small story-and-a-half 
gambrel roof building in the rear of the school-house l now the Shiloh Bap- 

14 



202 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

The Wardens, Mr. Wickham, Mr. Malbone and Mr. Edward 
Mumford, were to be a standing committee to adjust the whole busi- 
ness of the Vestry, and that they report their proceedings at each 
monthly meeting. 

Voted : that the Vestry meet the Monday evening after the 
monthly communion Sunday, alternately at each others' houses, 
beginning with Mr. Champlin. 

March 19, 1792. Voted: that the Wardens give Mr. Tilley a 
lease for the land on which his rope-walk now stands, for seven, or 
as many more years as he may choose, at the rate of fifteen dollars 
a year. 

Easter Monday, April 9, 1792. John Handy and Robert N. 
Auchmuty were elected Wardens ; Robert N. Auchmuty, Clerk of 
the Vestry ; John Meunscher, organist ; Daniel Vernon, sexton. 

Vestrymen : Francis Brinley, Charles Handy, Christopher Cham- 
plin, George Gibbs, Henry Hunter, John Mawdsley, Thomas Wick- 
ham, John Malbone, Francis Malbone, Benjamin Brenton, Stephen 
DeBlois, Edward Mumford and Peter Mumford. 

Mr. Stephen Ayrault, from old age and deafness, having resigned 
his place in the Vestry, it was unanimously 

Voted : that the thanks of the congregation be given him for his 
long and faithful services, and that the Clerk of the Vestry furnish 
him with a copy of this vote. 

Voted: that the Wardens, Mr. Thomas Wickham, Mr. Francis 
Malbone, and Mr. Edward Mumford be a standing committee to 
adjust the whole business of the Vestry, and that they report their 
proceedings at each monthly meeting. 



tist Church). There was no well on the premises, and an arrangement 
was made whereby the occupant of the house could have access to the well 
on the premises next west of it. The house was occupied for many years 
by John Springer, into whose possession it finally came, and he died there. 
Old and past repair, it was razed not many years ago. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 203 

August 6, 1792. Voted: that Mr. Francis Malbone be requested 
to represent this Church, as a lay delegate, at the State Convention, 
to be holden in Providence. 

At the Easter meeting, Edward Mumford retired from the Vestry, 
and Henry Sherburne and David Olyphant 213 were elected Vestry- 
men. No other changes were made. 

Easter Monday, April 1, 1794. Joseph Dyer was elected Clerk 
of the Church, and Samuel Whitehorne and John Handy were 
added to the Vestry, Handy still serving as Junior Warden. 

Voted: that the Wardens, with Henry Sherburne and William 
Littlefield, be the Standing Committee of the Church. 

2,4 January 13, 1795. Oliver Hazard, Raymond Henry Jones, 
Sarah Wallace and Matthew James Calbreth, children of Christo- 
pher Raymond Perry and Sarah, his wife, were baptized by Rev. 
Mr. Smith. 

February 21, 1 795. John Mawdsley was buried by Rev. Mr. 
Smith. 



213 Dr. David Olyphant was born in Scotland ; for many years he re- 
sided in Newport, and died here, in the home of his adoption, April 2, 
1805, at an advanced age. Previous to his coming to Newport, he had 
practiced in Charleston, South Carolina. He was eminent in his profes- 
sion, and "lived universally respected and revered." October 23, 1785, 
he was married to Ann Vernon, daughter of Samuel Vernon, by Timothy 
Waterhouse (father of Dr. Benj. Waterhouse), one of the Justices of the 
Court of Common Pleas. Witnesses, Major Daniel Lyman and Mrs. 
Lyman. Trinity Church at that time was without a Rector. 

214 Capt. Christ. Raymond Perrry, then in the merchant service, re- 
sided in Narragansett. In 1798 he received a commission as captain in 
the navy, and his two sous, Oliver and Matthew, both of whom rose to 
the rank of commodore, and became distinguished officers, entered the 
navy as midshipmen. Oliver was born in South Kensington, and Mat- 
thew in Newport. 



2o 4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

March 4, 1795. Died: Governor John Collins, 215 son of Governor 
Samuel Collins, and Hannah his wife, in his 78th year. 

Easter Monday, April 6, 1795. William Crooke and William 
Littlefield were added to the Vestry. Standing Committee, Messrs. 
Sherburne and Littlefield. 

Voted : that the thanks of the congregation be given to Mr. 
Porea, 216 for his kindness in performing on the organ, and that the 
Rector be requested to inform him of this vote. 

June 30, 1795. Mr. Auchmuty informed the Vestry, that Richard 
Harrison, Esq., of New York, had desired him to make the follow- 
ing proposal — " That he would take a lease of the house and grounds 
on the hill [the Kay estate] for nine hundred and ninety-nine years, 
and would pay for the same yearly, and every year during the same 
time, the sum of three hundred dollars ; and that on the execution 
of the lease he would make the Vestry a present of three hundred 
dollars, for the express purpose of new shingling the Church ; where- 
upon, after mature deliberation, it was " voted and resolved, that Mr. 
Harrison's offer be accepted, and that a lease be drafted and for- 
warded to him, for his approbation." 

October 7, 1795. Major Anthony Singleton 217 was buried in the 
church-yard. 

215 Governor John Collins was engaged in business in Newport prior to 
the Revolution. In 1774 he was elected an Assistant. In 1778 he was a 
delegate to the Continental Congress, and in 1786 he was taken up by 
the paper money party, and elected Governor in opposition to Governor 
Greene ; but in 1790, having given offence to his party by casting his vote 
in favor of the Federal Constitution, he was dropped by those who had 
previously supported him. 

21B This is the only mention made of Mr. Porea (of whom nothing more 
is known) and we are left in the dark as to why or when Meunscher, the 
organist, retired. 
*' 217 Major Singleton came to Newport from Richmond, Va., the pre- 
vious August, with his family; but already stricken with disease, he died 
in a few weeks. While here he had won the esteem of many persons. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 205 

October 15, 1795. John Malbone 218 was buried in the church- 
yard. 

October 19, 1795. William Miller, of Turk's Island, died here, 
and was buried in the church-yard. 

February, 1796. Thomas Hadley, late of the Island of Jamaica, 
died here in his 35 th year, and was decently interred in the church- 
yard. 

March 20, 1796. Felix, son of Citizen Arcambal, 219 Vice Consul 
of France, and Elizabeth Charles la Suganier, his wife, was baptized. 

March 29, 1796. 220 Baptized Ann Isabella, daughter of Cleland 
and Harriet Kinlock. 

[Following the death of Bishop Seabury, the Standing Committee 
of Rhode Island addressed this letter to the Standing Committee 
of Connecticut:] 

Newport, March 29, 1796. 
To the Standing Committee of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
in the State of Connecticut : 

Gentlemen: Duly impressed with a grateful sense of the bless- 



' /^i^Xo-^ 



eminent merchant, was 

yL-.igadier-General of the 
State militia at the time oi 
his death. His remains, attended by the Marine Society, of which he 
was an honorary member, were interred in the church-yard. He was the 
father of Edward G. Malbone, the distinguished immature painter. On 
his tombstone there is this inscription : 

"A gentleman whose sense of honor, liberality of sentiment, philan- 
thropy and benevolence, reflected lustre on his character as a merchant. 
citizen and friend, and justly gained him universal esteem." 

219 L. Arcambal succeeded M. Augustus Berhard Monpellier, as Vice 
Consul. M. Monpellier removed to Bristol, and died there. 

220 Cleland Kinlock was from South Carolina. He spent his summers 
here, with his family, for a number of years, and died at his country seal 
at Statesburg, S. C, September 12, 1823, aged 64 years. At one time, 
while residing in Newport, he occupied the Kay estate. 



206 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

ings enjoyed by the Protestant Episcopal Church in Rhode Island, 
in common with those of the State of Connecticut, during the 
Episcopal Regency of our departed Rt. Rev. Diocesan, we conceive 
it our duty at this time to join with you in paying our tribute of 
Regard to the memory of our worthy Bishop, and to call upon you 
for a continuance of our common ecclesiastical interest and 
diocesanal unity. And as it has pleased the adorable Head of the 
Church to call hence our visible centre of unity, we have to request 
you to use your best endeavors and influence with the churches 
which you represent, that they lose no time in making choice of a 
suitable person to watch over the Doctrines, Discipline and Institu- 
tions of our faith and common salvation. 

From the paucity of our congregations, we pretend not to any 
share in your election ; only to be admitted, so far do we request 
as to homologate your choice, and to give an adjunct suffrage and 
recommendation in favor of the elect, whom y e , under the direction 
of Almighty God, may judge worthy of filling the Episcopal chair. 

And may God, of his infinite goodness and love for this Church, 
direct us in all things for the good of the same ; that His Name may 
be glorified, and the number of the faithful daily increased and re- 
joice in the salvation of Jesus. 

We are, Gentlemen, with every sentiment of love and esteem, and 
with prayers for your temporal and eternal happiness, your most 
affectionate and very humble servants, the Standing Committee of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in Rhode Island, 
Wm Smith, Rect. Tr. C, N. Port, 

ROBT. N. AUCHMUTY, 

Abram L. Clarke, Reef St. John's Ch'h, Providence, 
John J. Clarke. 

To the above the following answer was returned. The copy is 
without date or signatures. 

To the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of Rhode Island : 
Gentlemen : 

Your polite and friendly letter of the 29 th of March, last, was 
received by us in due time. The occasion of your address was truly 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 207 

a melancholy one. The sudden departure of our late worth)' dio- 
cesan cast a gloom upon the minds of his numerous acquaintances, 
and especially upon the members of his care. We were happy in 
being favored with so good a man to fill the Episcopal chair ; and 
we sincerely lament the great loss we have sustained. 

The delay in answering your Letter until this time did not arise 
from any inattention to the subject. But we concluded we should be 
better able to comply with your request after the meeting of out- 
Convention than before. At that meeting your letter was read, the 
members unanimously expressing their wish that the union between 
the Churches of Rhode Island and Connecticut, which had taken 
place under the regency of our late Rt. Rev. Diocesan, might still 
be continued. The event of our meeting must, ere this, have been 
made known to you by the Rev. Mr. Smith. We trust that our 
unanimous choice of the Rev. Mr. Bowden will meet the approba- 
tion of our sister Churches of Rhode Island. Mr. Bowden's well- 
known abilities and integrity, if he accepts the appointment, will, we 
trust, in some measure repair the loss we have sustained, and be a 
means of continuing and firmly establishing that Diocesanal unity 
which has been so happily begun between us. That God would 
preserve, bless and direct his Church in all things, and finally receive 
us into everlasting glory, is the earnest prayer of 

Your most affectionate and very humble 

Servants. 

April 5, 1796. Mr. Auchmuty having presented to the Vestry 
a lease duly executed by Richard Harrison, Esq., of New York, of 
Mr. Kay's estate, agreeably to a vote passed by tljem, at a meeting 
on the 30th day of June last, it is voted and resolved: that the 
Wardens sign the counter lease, in behalf of the Minister, Wardens 
and Vestry and transmit the same to Mr. Harrison. 

The Wardens informed the Vestry that they had received the 
three hundred dollars, which he had promised to make them a 
present of, in order to shingle the church, and that they had lodged 
the same in the Rhode Island Bank. 



2o8 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Easter Monday, April 3, 1796. John Handy and Robt. N. 
Auchmuty were elected Wardens, and Win. R. Robinson and 
Saunders Malbone were added to the Vestry. 

Messrs. Christ. Champlin, Geo. Gibbs, Francis Malbone and John 
Bours, the Standing Committee, Mr. Auchmuty having declined to 
serve longer as Clerk of the Vestry, Mr. Bours was elected as 
Clerk, to serve through the ensuing year. John Dyer was continued 
as Clerk of the Church, and Daniel Vernon was continued as sexton. 
Mr. Berkenhead having offered to play on the organ, for whatever 
allowance any of the congregation may be pleased to make him, his 
proposal was accepted. 

April 7th, 1796. The vote and resolve following, after a very full 
and particular deliberation, passed unanimously : 

Whereas, the estate in the Town of Newport, late belonging to 
Nathaniel Kay, Esq., and bequeathed by him, in his last will and 
testament, in trust, to the Minister, Wardens and Vestry for the 
time being, of Trinity Church, for ever, for the support and main- 
tenance of a school-master, Episcopally ordained, to instruct ten 
poor boys in grammar and the mathematics gratis, and to assist 
the Minister of said Church ; hath been found from long experience 
to produce but a small and inadequate income for the benevolent 
purpose designed by the donor, by reason of the buildings and 
fences falling into decay, and from other unavoidable causes, there- 
fore, voted and resolved : that the offer made to us by Richard 
Harrison, Esq., of New York, and accepted, as from the record 
thereof made of "the 30th day of June last on this book of Church 
records, will appear, to take a lease of the mansion house, out- 
houses, garden, and lot of land adjoining, containing about seven 
acres, for the term of nine hundred and ninety-nine years, to com- 
mence from the 25th day of March, one thousand seven hundred 
and ninety-six, at the annual rent of three hundred silver dollars, or 
silver bullion equivalent thereto, be complied with, and that a proper 
lease be accordingly executed by the Wardens to the said Richard 
Harrison. And it is further voted and resolved, that the said an- 
nual rent of three hundred dollars, or silver bullion equivalent 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 209 

thereto, together with the rent of several small lots of land, situated 
and lying at the south part of the town, belonging to and being part 
of the aforesaid estate, bequeathed by said Nathaniel Kay, be re- 
ligiously and bona fide applied to answer and fulfil the benevolent 
design of the said Nathaniel Kay ; and that Messrs. Christopher 
Champlin, George Gibbs, John Hours and John Handy, be and 
hereby they are appointed a Standing Committee to carry said will 
into execution, by obtaining a person properly qualified to enjoy 
said living, who, upon his being approved of by the Minister, War- 
dens and Vestry, shall receive the whole amount of the rents of said 
estate, as aforesaid. 

But as some time may elapse before such person can be obtained, 
it is voted and resolved: that the committee aforesaid collect all the 
rents of said Richard Harrison, from time to time, as they become 
due, and put the same to interest, upon the best terms they can, at 
their discretion, and that the principal, with the interest thereon, 
until said school-master and assistant enter upon his living, as 
aforesaid, shall be made use of and appropriated (together with such 
other donations as may be obtained for the purpose) to the building 
of a school-house on the lot of land where the former church school- 
house stood, or on some other lot, in the opinion of the committee, 
more commodiously situated for a school-house. And that the said 
committee may proceed in exact conformity to the aforesaid resolves, 
the Clerk of the Vestry is hereby desired to furnish them an au- 
thenticated copy thereof, having first entered them in the Church 
book of records. 

And whereas, there is a considerable sum of money now due for 
the rent of the several lots of land at the south part of the Town, as 
aforementioned, it is voted and resolved, that said committee be re- 
quested to use their best endeavors to collect the same, together 
with the future rents of said lots, as they become due, and appropri- 
ate the same to the schooling as man)' poor boys belonging to the 
Church, under the direction of the Rev. Mr. Smith, as the money 
collected will allow of. And that the said committee make report 
of their doings to the Minister, Wardens and Vestry, on Easter 
Monday, annually, or oftener, if judged necessary. 
Attest, J. Bours, 

Clerk of Vestry. 



210 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

In consequence of permission obtained from the General Assembly 
of the State, to dispose of a lot of land in North Kingston, be- 
queathed some years past, by Nathaniel Norton, of Newport, to 
this Church, directing that the yearly rent obtained therefor should 
be enjoyed by the Rector of the said Church for the time being ; 
and it having been found from experience that said lot, from a variety 
of causes, had yielded but a trifling sum, it was, therefore, resolved, 
that the said lot should be disposed of by the Wardens, and the 
money received for the same, appropriated to purchase a lot of land 
adjoining, Westerly, the Church burial ground, of Thomas Wick- 
ham, agent for the heirs of the late James Honyman ; and that the 
Rector of the Church for the time being, shall be entitled to have 
the use and improvement of said lot, and shall be entitled also to a 
fee for every corpse interred within the same. 

August 28th, 1796. Whereas, a marble monument, to the memory 
of the late worthy Rector of this Church, the Rev. Marmaduke 
Browne and Ann his wife, sent from Ireland by their son, the Hon 131 " 
Arthur Browne, of said Kingdom, hath been received and erected 
in the Church by Mr. Bours, agreeable to permission heretofore 
granted for that purpose ; it is voted and resolved, by the congrega- 
tion, that we are highly gratified by having so elegant an ornament 
added to Trinity Church, to perpetuate the remembrance of two 
persons, deservedly esteemed while living, and recollected with 
pleasure by an affectionate congregation ; and that Mr. Bours be re- 
quested to signify the same to Mr. Browne. 

April 12th, 1797. The Rev. Mr. Smith, having informed the con- 
gregation that he had accepted a call to the congregation at Nor- 
walk, Connecticut, this day embarked with his family, to enter upon 
his new charge, after having been paid by the Wardens the balance 
due to him for his salary. 



NEWPORT, RHODE: ISLAND. 



CHAPTER XIV. 

i 797-1800. 

Easter Monday, April 17, 1797. William Crooke and William 
R. Robinson, chosen Wardens. 

Vestrymen: Francis Brinley, Christopher Champlin, George Gibbs, 
Henry Hunter, John Bours, Thomas Wickham, Francis Malbone, 
Benjamin Brenton, 221 Stephen Deblois, Henry Sherburne, John 
Handy, William Crooke, William Littlefield, Robert N. Auchmuty, 
William R. Robinson, Saunders Malbone. John Bours, Clerk of 
Vestry; Joseph Dyer, Clerk of Church ; Daniel Vernon, sexton. 

Voted : that Messrs. Bours, Handy and Auchmuty be the dele- 
gates from this Church at the next annual convention. 

Voted : that Messrs. David Olyphant, Francis Brinley, Christo- 
pher Champlin, John Bours and Robert N. Auchmuty, with the 
Wardens, be a committee to consult upon a plan for settling and sup- 
porting a minister. 

May 14, 1797. The committee appointed on Easter Monday last 
to consult upon a plan for settling and supporting a minister, 
having now reported the same, voted : that it be accepted, and that 
the Wardens use their endeavors to complete the same. 

Voted : that Mr. Bours and the Wardens be a committee to write 

221 Benjamin Brenton was a direct descendant of William Brenton. In 
1758 he was an officer in the Provincial regiment sent to the support of 
the troops then before Louisburg. In 1 796 he was in business in Newport 
in a small way, and subsequently was taking boarders in the Lopez House, 
on Thames Street. In 1810 his wife, Rachel Cooke, daughter of Silas 
Cooke, purchased the small house on Church Street that afterwards passed 
into the hands of Mrs. Mary S. Hunter, and was recently razed. There 
he resided with his family till he died, February 23, 1830, at the age of 

93 y ears - 



212 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

to the Rev. John S. J. Gardiner, at Boston, and request the favor of 
him to come to Newport, and spend a few Sundays with us. 

Resolved: that the fee for the burial of any person in the new 
burial-ground be, for the future, twelve dollars — eight of them to go 
to the Rector, and the other four to be applied to keeping the fences 
in repair. 

At a meeting of the congregation on Sunday, August 6, 1797 : 
Whereas, the Rev. John Sylvester J. Gardiner, Assistant Minister of 
Trinity Church in Boston, in consequence of an invitation from the 
committee appointed for that purpose at a meeting of the congrega- 
tion on Sunday afternoon, the 14th day of May last, has come to 
Newport, and hath officiated this and the last Sunday to our entire 
satisfaction, it is therefore voted and resolved {Nomine contradiccnte): 
that the said Rev. John Sylvester J. Gardiner be settled as Rector 
of this Church, and that he be allowed and paid, as a salary, at the 
rate of five hundred dollars per annum, in quarterly payments, to 
commence from the time of his salary ceasing in Boston ; and that 
he have the use and improvement of the parsonage-house and lot, 
together with all the perquisites to which our former Rectors were 
entitled; and that Mr. Bours, with the Wardens, be a committee to 
wait upon Mr. Gardiner, and deliver him a copy of these resolu- 
tions. 

September 17, 1797. Voted by the congregation: that a letter 
received from the Rev. John S. J. Gardiner by the Wardens be 
entered on the book of records of the Church as follows : 

Brookline, September 11, 1797. 
Gentlemen : 

When 1 had last the pleasure of seeing you, 1 was in full expec- 
tation of accepting the rectorship of your Church, to which I was 
the more strongly inclined from the unanimity that prevailed in my 
election; but as I considered that my future happiness would in a 
great measure depend on the event, I thought it prudent to weigh 
all the advantages and disadvantages that might result from my 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 



2I 3 



acceptance or refusal of your proposal, previous to any final deter- 
mination. On the one hand, I reflected that 1 might prove the in- 
strument in the hands of Providence of organizing a scattered 
Church, and of reuniting a divided people; on the other hand, I was 
deterred from the undertaking from a sense of its extreme difficulty, 
and by the fear that my best exertions would prove abortive. I 
thought, also, that the salary you had voted was a very inadequate 
compensation for the greatness of the risk, and that, though it was 
much to you, in your present situation, to give, it was very little for 
me to receive. Whilst I was thus wavering in my mind, two cir- 
cumstances occurred which at length determined me, though with 
great reluctance, to decline your offer. Mrs. Gardiner expressed 
stronger disinclination than I expected, to remove to a strange place, 
where she would have new friendships to form, and new habits to 
acquire ; and the Church, desirous of retaining me, evinced their 
approbation and attachment by raising my present salary to eight 
hundred dollars. From every motive of gratitude and interest I am 
induced therefore to remain where I am, and I doubt not you will 
acquiesce in the reasonableness and propriety of my determination. 
I should have declined your proposal with more regret, were there 
not a very promising young man now ready to accept an advanta- 
geous settlement in the Episcopal Church. The gentleman I allude 
to is a Mr. Dehon, now residing at Cambridge, of irreproachable 
morals, pleasing manners, a good reader and an animated and an in- 
teresting preacher. To these qualities he joins a larger share of 
ancient and modern literature than is commonly met with in so 
young a student. He can be powerfully recommended by Dr. Parker, 
and other respectable characters. Nothing will afford me more 
pleasure to see your Church flourishing in all its former splendor; 
and I know no one more able to effectuate this most desirable event 
than this young gentleman. 

I am, gentlemen, with every sentiment of gratitude and esteem, 
&c, 

Your obliged hum bl * servt, 



&<~ S/-&^$-^<J> 



The Church Wardens and Vestry 
of Trinity Church, Newport. 



2i 4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted and resolved : that Mr. Bours, with the Wardens, be a com- 
mittee to write to Mr. Theodore Dehon, at present residing in Cam- 
bridge, who has been warmly recommended as a young gentleman 
of learning, and of an irreproachable character, and who is a candi- 
date for Holy Orders in the Episcopal Church, and invite him to 
come to Newport and officiate a few Sundays for us, that we may 
have an opportunity of hearing him, and if agreeable to both him 
and the congregation, to make proposals for a settlement. 

Voted : that the thanks of the congregation [be extended] to the 
Rev. Mr. Moscrop, for his kindly officiating for us, a number of 
Sundays past, in our destitute state, and that the Wardens present 
him on the morrow with a copy of this vote. 

Meeting of the congregation, October 8 th , 1797. Whereas Mr. 
Theodore Dehon, in consequence of an invitation given him by the 
committee appointed for that purpose, at a meeting of the congrega- 
tion, on Sunday, the 17 th day of September last, hath come to New- 
port and inform him that it is the unanimous will of the congrega- 
tion, that he would enter into Holy Orders as soon as may be, and 
become our Rector ; that he be allowed and paid, as a salary, at the 
rate of $500 per annum, in quarterly payments, to commence at the 
time of his leaving the Church at Cambridge, and that he have and 
receive all the perquisites to which our former Rectors were entitled, 
together with the use and improvement of the parsonage-house and 
lot, and that the committee assure him the congregation will afford 
every assistance in their power towards his speedily obtaining 
Deacon's and Priest's Orders, and that Mr. Dehon be requested to 
give an answer to these proposals. 

September 24, 1797. Daniel Mason" 2 died and was buried in the 
church-yard. 

2 ^ ft jj second son of the late Benj. Mason and 

^&^S<-sH.(Z4<??tJ Mary ( Ayrault) his wife, was born at New- 
port, in 1755. He was a merchant, at one time engaged in business with 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 215 

Meeting of the congregation, October 29 th , 1797. A letter from 
Mr. Theodore Dehon, of the 21 st , wherein he declines accepting the 
proposals made to him by the congregation, on Sunday, the 8 th 
inst., being laid before them by the committee appointed to deliver 
the same, it is therefore voted and resolved: that Mr. Dehon be 
again appealed to, and that Messrs. Brinley, Champlin, Gibbs, and 
Bours be a committee for that purpose, and that two hundred dol- 
lars more be added to the five hundred voted him as a salary, pro- 
vided that bethought by him a support adequate to induce him to 
accept the rectorship of our Church. 

Meeting of the congregation, November 19, 1797. 

In confirmation and addition to a vote passed on the 29th day of 
October last, it is voted and resolved unanimously : that a vote 
passed by the congregation on the 8th day of October last, inviting 
Mr. Theodore Dehon to enter into Holy Orders, and to take upon 
Him the rectorship of our Church, and offering to pay him a salary 
of $500, be reconsidered; and that we will allow and pay him as a 
salary, at the rate of S700 per annum, in quarterly payments, to 
commence on his taking charge of the Church, together with the 
use and improvement of the parsonage-house and lot, and all the 
other perquisites to which our former Rectors were entitled ; and 
that the Wardens, with Mr. Bours, be continued a committee to in- 
form Mr. Dehon immediately of these proceedings, by enclosing 
him a copy of this vote, and requesting from him an answer as soon 
as may be. 

The aforegoing vote having been communicated by the committee 
to Mr. Dehon, the following letter was received from him in answer 
thereto : 



Col. Francis Malbone, and died a bachelor. His remains were borne to 
the grave in Trinity Church-yard, by the Artillery Company and the 
Marine Society, of both of which organizations he was a member. 



216 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHLRCH, 

To the Congregation of Trinity Church at Newport. 

Gentlemen : 

The convincing proof of your anxiety for my settlement among 
you as your Rector, exhibited in your renewed application, flatters 
and affects me. When I answered your former proposals, the pre- 
dominant objection against a compliance with your wishes was the 
want of a stipend adequate to the situation. But for this, I should 
have been influenced by your unanimity, and felt it my duty to com- 
ply with your request. This objection being silenced by your sec- 
ond resolve, and the same unanimity of proceeding having continued, 
I feel it an obligation to accept, with cheerfulness, the Rectorship 
of your Church; relying for assistance upon that Being who alone 
is capable of blessing men with endowments equal to the offices 
which they are called to sustain. I promise on my part to discharge 
the several duties of that office, which I now accept, as far as I am 
able, and so long as the providence of God shall see fit to continue 
me in the same. 

It will doubtless, gentlemen, be most agreeable to you, and it will 
be most convenient for me, that I receive Holy Orders before I 
meet you at Newport. As a presentation from you will be expected 
by the Bishop, it is necessary that it should be forwarded by the 
earliest opportunity ; I shall endeavor to be with you immediately 
after Orders shall have been obtained, and devoutly wish that we 
may then commence a long series of years of mutual satisfaction, 
comfort and joy. 

Cambridge, November 29, 1797. 

January II, 1798. Voted and resolved, unanimously, that Mr. 
Bours, with the Wardens, wait upon our Rector, the Rev. Mr. De- 
hon, and assure him that we, as well as the congregation at large, 
were greatly gratified by his excellent, well adapted discourse de- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 217 

livered on Sunday morning last, upon commencing the duties of 
his ministry, and request the favor of a copy thereof for the press. 222 ' 

January 16, 1798. Voted and resolved unanimously, that the 
Rector, Clerk and Wardens be a committee to present to the Rev 1 
I >oct r Parker, of Trinity Church, Boston, a tribute of thanks for his 
exertions and kind wishes in behalf of our Church, and to request 
of him a copy of the sermon delivered at the ordination of our 
Rector, for the press. 

Voted : that Mr. Brinley, Mr. Gibbs and Mr. Wickham be a com- 
mittee to make all necessary examination, and report the most 
eligible place and method for erecting a vestry-room. 

Voted : that Mr. Wickham, Mr. Malbone, Mr. Auchmuty, Major 
Handy and Mr. Bours be a standing committee to transact the busi- 
ness of the Church, and report their doings, from time to time, to 
the Rector, Wardens and Vestry. 

Easter Monday, April 9, 1798. William Crooke and William K. 
Robinson elected Wardens. 

The Vestry and other officers of the Church remain the same as 
last year. 

Voted : that a vestry-room 223 be immediately built at the north- 
east corner of the Church, on the outside, and that Messrs. Brinle) , 
Gibbs and Wickham be a committee to have the same done, and thai 
the expense be paid by subscription, provided the money can be 
raised -that way ; if not, that the Wardens and Vestry be authorized 
to dispose of one or more of the pews which have reverted to the 
Church, in order to obtain the money. 

The letter from Rev. James Honyman, under date of December 



222a There is no evidence that this request was complied with. 

m This is the present vestry-room. When first built, and for more than 
forty years, it was without a door from the street, and was only reached 
through the Church. 

15 



2 iS ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

6, 1725, on page 40, had been lost ; it was found by Mr. Christopher 
Champlin, presented to the Vestry April 9, 1798 ; whereupon it was 
voted : that the thanks of the congregation be presented to Mr. 
Champlin for his kind attention to the interest of the Church in pro- 
curing and preserving so essential a document as the afore recorded 
certificate, and also to Mr. Andrew Freebody for his " Book of 
Musick," for the use of the organist of the Church, this day pre- 
sented. 

Voted : that the tax on all the pews below be ten dollars, except 
the double pews, which are to be twenty dollars, and those one and 
a half pews, fifteen dollars, and the gallery pews four dollars, for the 
ensuing year. 

Voted : that the house and lot of land bequeathed by William 
Tate, late of Newport, in his last will and testament, to and for the 
use of the poor of our Church, be, in future, under the immediate 
care and direction of the Wardens, and that the annual rent thereof 
be received by them and paid over to the Rector, first deducting all 
necessary repairs, and by him distributed among the most neces- 
sitous and deserving poor of the Church at his own discretion ; it 
being of the opinion of the Vestry that the rents hitherto received 
amount to the sums expended by the Church, from time to time, 
in repairs on the same. 

Meeting of the congregation, July 9, 1798. Voted: that the con- 
stitution of the churches in this State, transmitted to this Church by 
order of the ' convention 224 for adoption, be adopted, on condition 



m At the Annual Convention of the Church, held that year in 
Trinity Church, July nth, Rt. Rev. 
Bishop of Massachusetts, was elected 
Bishop of Rhode Island. He was 
born at Dorchester, Mass., November 23, 1726. He graduated at Har- 
vard, was ordained in London by Rt. Rev. Bishop Sherlock, Bishop of 



tdvJo^ Kofi 



NEWPORT, RHODE JSLAND. 2T9 

that the convention accede to the amendments proposed in the re- 
turned draft, viz., the alteration of the third article, the erasure 
of the eleventh and thirteenth, and the alteration of the twelfth 
article. 

Voted: that Messrs. Francis Brinley, Christopher Champlin and 
George Gibbs be added to Messrs. hours, J. Handy and Robert \. 
Auchmuty as delegates to represent this Church in the State Con- 
vention, to be held at Newport on Wednesday, the 1 ith instant. 

Voted: that the Wardens and Vestry dispose of one or more of 
the pews below, which have been forfeited to the Church, at their 
discretion, in order to defray the expense of new doors, and Vene- 
tian blinds to the large window in the chancel, and that in the vestry- 
room, and make any necessary repairs in the Church. 

Pew No. S2, late James Clarke's, appearing clearly to have re- 
verted to the Church, was sold to Jacob Smith for the sum of $80, 
and the same appropriated towards building the vestry-room. 

Pew No. 70, lately improved -by Thomas Rogers, was sold to 
Samuel Lawton for $60, and the money appropriated to pay for the 
new doors and Venetian blinds. 

N. B. Pew No. 56, late Thomas T. Taylor, was sold by Nich* G. 
Tillinghast, executor, to Robert N. Auchmuty, with the approbation 
of the Wardens. 

At a meeting of the Rector, Wardens and Vestry, February 5, 
1799. Whereas, it appears from the report of the School Commit- 
tee that they have received the rents of the Kay estate leased to 
Richard Harrison, as the) 1 have become due, agreeably to the lease, 
and that the sum which will become due on the 25th day of Sep- 
tember next being added thereto, there will be a sufficient sum to 



London, and on his return to America was elected Rector of St. Paul's, 
Newburyport, where he resided during the rest of his days. He was con- 
secrated by Bishop White in Philadelphia, May 7, 1797. 



220 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

build a school-house, voted and resolved : that a school-house be 
built as soon as may be on the lot where the old school-house stood, 
and that Mr. Gibbs, Mr. Bours and Mr. William R. Robinson be a 
committee to consult upon a plan to carry the same into effect, and 
this meeting to stand adjourned to Monday evening next, the nth 
inst. 

February II, 1799. Voted and resolved : that a school-house be 
built on the lot where the old house stood ; that it be forty feet long 
and twenty-five feet wide; a tower of eight feet square, rising out of 
the body of the building, at the east end, eight feet above the roof; 
that there be a cellar under the whole ; that a chimney be built at 
the west end, in the centre; that there be two arched windows at 
the west end, of 24 squares of 7 x 9 glass, exclusive of the arch, 
and three such windows on each side, and that the whole be finished 
in a plain, neat manner, agreeably to said plan offered by the com- 
mittee. 224a 

Easter Monday, March 25, 1799. The officers and Vestry were 
re-elected. 

Mr. Gibbs was requested to write to Philadelphia to make in- 
quiry whether a suitable person conld be had from thence for an 
organist. 

Voted : that Messrs. Brinley, Gibbs, Champlin, Auchmuty and 
Handy be delegates to the next annual convention. 

June 28, 1799. The building an addition to the parsonage, for 
the better accommodation of the Rector, was ordered; and in order 
to defray the expense thereof, the Wardens are authorized to hire 
the money bequeathed by Robert Wheatley, in his last will and tes- 
tament, to the poor of the Church, and that they give a bond for the 
same to the trustees appointed by the said Wheatley to dispose of 



22i« -phe building, corner of Mary and School Streets, is now owned and 
occupied by the Shiloh Baptist Society. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 221 

the same ; the congregation to hold themselves accountable for 
whatever sum is paid on account of said legacy, with lawful interest 
thereon. 

August 24, 1799. Grenville Temple, 23 son of Sir Grenville 
Temple and Lady Temple, was baptized. Sponsors : Sir Grenville. 
his Lady and Mr. John Rutledge. 

October 20, 1799. Caleb Gardner 26 was married to Mary Col- 
lins, daughter of Gov. John Collins. 

December 1, 1799. Benjamin Gardiner,' 27 of Middleton, was mar- 
ried to Almy Ann Coggeshall, of Newport. 




Grenville Temple, the father of Sir John Temple, then the British 
Minister at New York, had married in Boston. March, 1797, Mrs. Russell, 
widow of the late Thomas Russell. 

23B ^ ^ < ^ who was born at Newport, 

/ (j J January 24, 1759, attained to 

^Lyu'^^f^ x prominent position. June 3, 
1770, he married Sarah Ann 
Robinson, daughter of Dr. 
James Robinson, by whom he 
had five children. She died in 
1777. and April 17, 1788, he married Sarah, daughter of Samuel Fowler, 
who bore him other five children, and died in 1795. Mary Collins, to 
whom he was married as above, died October 2, 1806, and Mr. Gardner 
died December 24th of the same year. 

During the Revolution Captain Gardner enjoyed the confidence of both 
the American and French forces, and when peace was established he was 
appointed French Consul for this district. At his house, now owned by 
the heirs of the late Dr. Daniel Watson, he entertained the distinguished 
officers of the allied armies. 

Benjamin Gardiner was the son of William Gardiner, and grandson 
of Joseph Gardiner, of Narragansett. He resided on a farm near Para- 
dise rock, and was a useful member of the Church. His first wife was 
Elizabeth Wickes, daughter of Thomas Wi< kes, of Warwick. His second 
wife was the above-named Almy Ann Coggeshall. who died the following 
month, and was buried January 8, 1800. March 5, 1801, he married 
Mary Howland, of Jamestown. 

Mr. Gardiner was a vestryman in 1786. 



222 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

[The news of the death of General Washington reached Newport 
on Sunday morning, December 22, 1799. The bells of the churches 
and the State House were tolled throughout the day, save during 
the hours of divine service, and on the following day there was a 
total suspension of business. The following Sunday the Fraternity 
of Masons assembled at the State House, and marched with muffled 
drums and in suitable mourning, to Trinity Church, where the Rector, 
Rev. Mr. Dehon, preached a funeral sermon, which was published, 
with the following title: 

" A Discourse delivered in Newport, Rhode Island, before the 
Congregation of Trinity Church, The Masonic Society, and the 
Newport Guards, the Sunday following the Intelligence of the Death 
of General George Washington. By Theodore Dehon, A.M., 
Rector of Trinity Church in Newport. Printed by Henry Barber. 
MDCCC." 

The pulpits in Trinity Church and the Congregational Church 
were draped with mourning. 

A funeral service was held on the 6th of January, 1800, under 
direction of Major Daniel Jackson, commandant of this district. 

At daybreak there was a discharge of artillery at Forts Adam and 
Wolcott, and a gun was fired every half hour till sunset. At noon 
the bier was received on the Parade, in front of the State House, 
the troops gathered there presenting arms. The procession was" 
then formed, and moved to Trinity Church in the following order, 
the batteries at the forts firing minute guns till the cortege reached 
the Church : 

Newport Guards. 

Newport Artillery. 

Music. 

(A dead march with muffled drums.) 

Artillerists and Engineers, from Fort Adams. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 223 

Officers of the Army. 

Officers of the Navy. 

Militia Officers. 

Custom-House Officers. 

The Orator of the Day. 

Society of Cincinnati. 

The Clergy. 

The Bier, borne by four Sergeants. 

Pall Bearers : 
Col. Rogers, Wm. Channing, Esq., 

Col. Sheldon, Col. Tew, 

Col. Crary, Col. Sherburne, 

each wearing a white scarf tied with a bow on the left shoulder ; in 
the centre of the bow a rose of black, and the eagle of the Society 
of Cincinnati. 

Masonic Society. 

Marine Society. 

Town Council. 

Mechanics' Association. 

Citizens. 

At the Church, after a prayer was offered by Rev. Mr. Dehon. a 
funeral anthem was sung, and an oration was delivered by Major 
Daniel Lyman, a revolutionary officer. The procession was then 
reformed, and the bier was borne to the place of interment, where 
it was deposited with solemn music and volleys of musketry. A 
vast concourse of people from the neighboring towns attended the 
ceremony, and all business was suspended during the day.] 

March 18, 1800. Voted and resolved : that so far as this Church 
is interested in behalf of the poor belonging thereto, in the one-half 
part of a house and lot in Newport, given and bequeathed to them 



224 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

by Robert Wheatley, 228 of said Newport, in his last will and testa- 
ment, we will join with the heirs of the other half part of said house 
and lot in disposing of the same, and do hereby signify our appro- 
bation that Mr. Bours, Administrator to the estate of Mary Wheat- 
ley, widow of said Robert, execute a deed to Thomas Hudson, in 
conjunction with the said heirs to the other half part of said house 
and lot, for the consideration of eight hundred dollars, the whole 
sum. 

Voted : that Messrs. Bours and Auchmuty be appointed trustees, 
together with the Rev. Mr. Dehon, in conformity to Robert Wheat- 
ley's will, to appropriate the interest money arising annually on four 
hundred dollars, being the one-half part the house and lot of land 
said Wheatley bequeathed to the poor of the Church, was sold for ; 
and the said $400, loaned by the said trustees to the Church for the 
purpose of repairing and enlarging the parsonage-house, agreeably 
to a vote passed by the congregation on the 30th day of June, 1799, 
and that the Wardens give a bond to said trustees for the same ; and 
that they, the said trustees, make report of their doings annually to 



4?X* ^Lojfaf^ 



His will was proved February j , 
1762. His first wife was Mary Young, 
to whom he was married May 4, 
1746. She died, and December 17, 1747, he then married Mary Read. 
She outlived him. In his will he gave his estate to his wife during her 
natural life, or until she married, should she take another husband. Then 
the property was to go to his son William ; but if his son died before his 
wife and without issue, then one-half of the estate was to go to the heirs 
of John Jepson, and the other half to the poor of Trinity Church, " to 
be distributed to such persons as the Minister of said Church, and any 
pious communicants thereto, shall judge the most proper objects." Jepson 
died during the lifetime of Mrs. Wheatley, leaving a daughter, whose 
heirs united with the Church in transferring the estate to Thomas Hudson, 
March 19, 1800, he paying for the same "eight hundred Spanish milled 
dollars." 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 225 

the Vestry, the first distribution to commence on Christmas day 
next. 

Voted and resolved : that the Rev. Mr. Dehon and Mr. Auch- 
muty be a committee to make inquiry for a suitable person to take 
charge of the Church school, qualified agreeably to Mr. Kay's will, 
and that they be authorized to assure him the tuition of forty 
scholars at fifteen shillings per quarter, from his entering upon the 
charge until the 25th day of September next, from which time In 
will be entitled to receive $300 per annum, the amount of rent paid 
bv Richard Harrison, Esq., of New York, for the house and land 
left in trust by the said Mr. Kay, for the support of a school-master 
Episcopally ordained, to the Reetor, Wardens and Vestry, for the 
instruction of ten poor boys, in grammar and the mathematics, and 
assist the Reetor in some part of the service of the Church, as occa- 
sion may require. 

April 14, 1800. Mrs. Mary Brett, 229 widow of Dr. John Rrett, 
was buried. 



m *yyn </2 //L-».was an exceedingly conscientious and good 

// COJ/iJ r\J/\Z/tis woman. Her maiden name was Howland, 

^f a daughter of Rowland Howland, and she 

was married to Dr. Brett February 10, 1739. But little is known of Dr. 
Rrett. other than that he was a native of Germany, and a graduate of the 
University of Levden. He was a scholarly man, and' contributed to the 
collection of books forming the Redwood Library. 

The name of Mrs. Brett is assoeiated with a free school for negroes 
before the Revolution. A society in London, composed of a number of 
benevolent clergymen of the Church of England, had taken up the sub- 
ject, and had offered to furnish means to sustain schools of this kind. 
Each school was to number thirty pupils, negro children, who were to be 
taught reading, writing, sewing, etc Such a school was opened by Mi ;. 
Brett at her residence on High Street, Newport, in March, 1773. At the 
time of her death she was in her S6th year. 



226 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH 



CHAPTER XV. 

1800-1803. 

Easter Monday, April 15, 1800. William Crooke and William 
R. Robinson were elected Wardens. 

Voted : that the number of vestrymen for the future be thirteen. 

Vestrymen: Francis Brinley, Christopher Champlin, George 
Gibbs, John Bours, Francis Malbone, Benjamin Brenton, Henry 
Sherburne, John Handy, William Littlefield, Robert N. Auchmuty, 
William R. Robinson, Saunders Malbone and William Crooke. 
John Bours, Clerk of the Vestry ; Joseph Dyer, Clerk of the Church ; 
Daniel Vernon, Sexton. 

Voted: that the Wardens continue the present organist, Mr. John 
Berkenhead, in his office during good behavior, and that they allow 
him one dollar and twenty-five cents for every Sunday, and other 
holy days, that he officiates. 

August 3, 1800. Voted and resolved: that Mr. Benjamin Bren- 
ton be requested to communicate to the daughters of Capt. Jahleel 
Brenton, at Leith, in Scotland, the thanks of the Rector, Wardens 
and Vestry of this Church for the elegant damask table-cloth, spun 
and presented by them for the altar thereof, and to express to them 
their admiration of this specimen of female industry, piety and 
benevolence. 

August 18, 1800. Whereas, the Rev. Mr. Abraham Brunson, of 
Cheshire, in the State of Connecticut, has undertaken the charge of 
the Church school, on the Kay foundation, voted: that the com- 
mittee who were chosen in March last to make inquiry for a person 



z 



H 



n 




NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 227 

qualified for said office, agreeably to said donation, make the ne- 
cessary arrangements with Mr. Brunson relative to his settlement, 
and make report to the next meeting of the Vestry. 

Voted: that the Vestry meet in future on the evening of the first 
Monday of every month, at each other's houses, alternately, begin- 
ning with Mr. Brinley, as Senior Vestryman, and proceed through 
the whole number, according to their standing. 

September 1, [800. Voted: that the Clerk of the Vestry furnish 
the Rev. Mr. Dehon, our Rector, with the documents necessary for 
him to present to Bishop Bass, upon his application to him for 
Priest's ( )rders, agreeably to the canons of the Church. 

February 2, iXor. Voted: that the Rev. Mr. Dehon, Mr. Bours 
and Mr. A in hmuty be a committee to make inquiry for a suitable 
person to take charge of the Church school, in the room of the Rev. 
Me Brunson, who has signified by a message to the Vestry this 
evening, that he proposes to give up his charge on the first day of 
Jul\- next, provided a successor can be had by that time ; otherwise 
to remain until the fall. 

Whereas, a deed of a gift ol a pew in the Church, being the south 
half part of pew numbered 86, late belonging to Frances Piper, 
wife of John Piper, ofColyston, County of Devonshire, Great Britain, 
to her three children, viz : Stephen Ayrault Wanton, Sarah, wife of 
Joseph Huntington, and Francis, wife of William C. Robinson, has 
been presented to the Vestry. 

Voted : that the same be accepted. 

February 16, 1801. Buried: the Honorable Lucia C. Grattan 

March 16, iSoi. Voted: that Mr. Bours and Mr. Malbone be a 
( ommittee to draw a plan for establishing a fund for the support of 



230 Lady Grattan was the widow of Col. Grattan, < ousin-german to the 
Rt. Hon. Henry Grattan, the Irish orator, ami eldest sister of Lord Vis- 
count Falkland. 



2*8 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

the Rector of the Church, at a future period, and lay the same 
before the congregation on Easter Monday next. 

Voted : that the report of the Trustees who were chosen on the 
1 3th of March last, to receive from the Wardens a bond executed 
by them, in behalf of the congregation, for the sum of $400, given 
by Robert Wheatley, in his will, to the poor of the church, and 
loaned by the congregation, the interest arising thereon to be paid 
said poor on every Christmas day, be received and placed on the 
files of the Church. 

At an adjourned meeting Easter Tuesday, April 7, 1801, William 
C. Robinson and Samuel Whitehorne were chosen Wardens. The 
Vestrymen and other officers of the Church remained unchanged. 

The salary of Mr. Rerkenhead, the organist, was raised to $2 for 
every day that he officiated. 

Voted: that the tax on the pews be continued the same; one- 
third part for the support of the Rector, and two-thirds for the sup- 
port of the other officers and the repairs of the Church. 

Voted : that the committee appointed at Easter last, to consider 
the expediency of disposing of the lot in the Church lane, be con- 
tinued, with the addition of Messrs. Benjamin Gardiner and William 
R. Robinson, and that they sell the same for the most it will fetch, 
and purchase another lot with the money, covenanting, however, 
with the purchaser of the lot in the Church lane, that no school- 
house shall ever be set thereon. 

The subscribers, having been chosen a committee by the Rector, 
Wardens and Vestry, the 16th of March last, to draw a plan for 
establishing a fund for the support of the Rector, at a future period, 
to be laid before the congregation on Easter Monday, do report, 
that we have not, as yet, fully digested a plan, but would beg leave 
to observe, that, in our opinion, nothing would have a greater ten- 
dency to promote and secure the future welfare and prosperity of 
the Church, than such a measure, and would recommend the pre- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 229 

viously taking the sense of the congregation upon the practicability 
thereof; and that a subscription be set on foot to try what sum can 
be collected to lay a foundation for said fund. All which is re- 
spectfully submitted. 

John Bouks, 
Fras. Malbone. 

Newport, April 7, 1801. 



In consequence of the above report, which is accepted, it is voted 
and resolved : that the Clerk of the Vestry and the Wardens be a 
committee to draft a subscription, and endeavor to obtain as many 
signers thereto as they can, and make report of their doings within 
three months, to the Vestry, who will thereupon lay the business, 
if they judge it expedient, before the congregation. 

May 4, 1 80 1. Voted: that thirty feet of the east end of the lot 
in the Church lane, which was ordered by the congregation to be 
sold on Easter Monday last, be added to the burial ground, and the 
remainder only of said lot sold by the committee appointed for that 
purpose. 

Whereas, Bishop Bass has intimated his intention of being at 
Newport, on a visit to our Church, the second Sunday in June next, 
voted: that a collection be made on said day, after divine service, in 
the afternoon, in order to defray the expenses of his journey. 

May 7, 1801. Capt. Evan Malbone, of Pomfret, Connecticut, 
having sold one-half of pew number 79, on the south side of the 
middle aisle, belonging to him, to Mr. Andrew Freebody, owner of 
the other half, for $32.50; this record is made by desire of said 
Freebody. 

[July 4, 1801. The use of the Church was granted for the de- 
livery of an oration before the Society of Cincinnati. The following 
notice of the event is condensed from the Newport Mercury, of the 
ensuing week :] 



2 3° 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



" The procession after passing through the principal streets of 
the Town, was received at Trinity Church with the appropriate 
tune, ' Washington's March.' Rev. Mr. Patten, 281 of the Second 
Congregational Church, opened the exercises with prayer. The 
oration, prepared at the request of the Society of the Cincinnati, 
was delivered by Mr. William Hunter, 232 after which an ode, 23a 




Rev. Dr. Patten, born 
at Halifax, Mass., took 
his degree at Dartmouth 
College, in 1783, and, 
at the suggestion of 
Rev. Dr. Stiles, was 
placed in charge of the 
Second Congregational Church, in Newport, over which he was settled 
in 1786. In 1833 ne retired from the church and removed to Hartford, 
Ct., where he died in 1839, aged 77 years. He was a Fellow of Brown , 
University, which institution conferred upon him the degree of D.D. 
For a list of his published works, see Hammett's " Bibliography of New- 
port." 

son of Dr. William 
""* Hunter, was born at 
Newport, in 1774, and 
died here December 3, 1849. He graduated at Brown University in 
1 79 1, went to England and began the study of medicine under Dr. John 
Hunter, but not liking the profession, he turned to the law, and became 
the pupil of Arthur Murphy. On his return to America, at the age of 
21 years, he was admitted to the bar. His public career commenced in 
1799, when he was elected a Representative to the General Assembly of 
his native State, which office he filled at various times till 181 1, when he 
was elected United States Senator. In 1834 he was appointed Minister 
Plenipotentiary to Brazil, from which position he retired in 1844, and re- 
turned to Newport, where he passed the remainder of his days. 

Mr. Hunter married the beautiful Mary Robinson, of New York. Oi 
their numerous family, but one survives, Mr. Thomas R. Hunter, of New- 
port. 
233 Ode. 

Written by William Ellery, a signer of the Declaration of Independ- 




NEWPORT, RHODE TSLAND. 231 

written by a young gentleman of Newport — a musical address to 
the Cincinnati — was sung to the tune, ' God Save Great Washing- 
ton.' The dinner, served in the Representative Room in the State 



elite, and dedicated to the Rhode Island State Society of Cincinnati, for 
the dinner at Newport, 4th July, 1801 : 

Hark ! Freedom's silver horn, 
Pours on the peerless morn, 

The festive lay ; 
Ye sons of bold emprise. 
From peaceful slumber rise, 
Awake with glad surprise 

To hail the day. 

\e peers of Washington, 

Like him and Rome's best son. 

Be peace your aim ; 
The plough or falchion wield, 
Your native country shield, 
The Senate or the field 

Gives equal fame. 

No tumults here will thrive, 
While hoary vet'rans live 

To guard the State ; 
Their swords, for public law 
And order, they will draw, 
Excite submissive awe 

In Empire great. 

Alas ! Columbia weeps, 
Her Cincinnatus sleeps 

In Vernon's grave ; 
Yet still his spirit guides, 
High o'er our State presides, 
And on the thunder rides 

With power to save. 



2 3 2 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

House, was presided over by Col. Jeremiah Olney, who had that day 
been re-elected President of the Society." 



September 7, 1801. Voted: that the Wardens, with Captain 
Littlefield, be a committee to endeavor to ascertain the true bounds 
of the land whereon the Church stands, to the westward of said 
land, adjoining a lot of land late belonging to the heirs of Samuel 
Rhodes, and now belonging to Miss Searing. 

September — , 1801. Dr. Benjamin Mason 234 was buried in the 
church-yard. 

November 2, 1801. Whereas, no day has been set apart this 
autumn by the civil rulers of the State, as a day of Thanksgiving 
and Prayer to Almighty God, and whereas in the confident expec- 
tation of such an appointment the day has elapsed appropriate for 
that purpose, by the standing order of our Church, in case of no 
such appointment by the civil authorities, therefore voted and re- 
solved unanimously : 

That it be recommended to the congregation of Trinity Church, 
to observe Thursday, the 26th day of thfs month, as a day of thanks- 
giving and praise to the Most High, for the spiritual and temporal, 



^^^f/a 




Dr. Benjamin Mason, eldest son of 
Benjamin Mason and Mary Ayrault 
(of Daniel 2d ), his wife, was born in 
March, 1762. November 8, 1788, 
he was married at Narragansett, by Rev. William Smith, to Margaret 
Champlin, of Christopher. After studying in the office of Dr. Isaac Sen- 
ter, he completed his medical education in London. At the death of Dr. 
Senter, who held the appointment at the time, he was made Director and 
Purveyor-General of the Military Hospital of Rhode Island. He was an 
honorary member of the Massachusetts Medical Society. His career in 
Newport was as short as it was brilliant, for he died at the early age of 
forty years. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, 233 

public and private blessings of the year past, and of devout suppli- 
cation for a continuance of His many and unmerited favors. 

December;, [801. Voted: that the Rev' 1 . Mr. Brunson be re- 
quested to write to Mr. Merriam, at present residing at Brookiine, 
on Long Tsland, who has been recommended to the Vestry as a 
suitable person to succeed him as Assistant Minister and school- 
master, on Mr. Kay's donation, and recommend to him coming on 
to Newport, as soon as convenient to him, that the Vestry may treat 
with him with regard to his undertaking the char; 

March 8, [802. Voted: that Mr. Clement Merriam be invited 
to take charge of the Episcopal school and perform the duties of the 
Assistant Minister in Trinity Church, upon the conditions on which 
the Rev. Mr. Brunson was engaged ; and that the Clerk of the Ves- 
try, with Mr. Brunson, be requested to transmit to him a copy of 
this vote, and explain to him what the said conditions ar< , 

April 6, 1802. Whereas, the committee appointed -it Easter last, 
to dispose of the lot on the Church lane, have reported that they 
have sold said lot to Simeon Martin, 235 for the sum of $400. Voted : 
that William R. Robinson, Senior Warden, be requested to pur- 
chase a lot of four acres of land on the hill, offered for sale by Sam- 
uel Gardiner for $600, provided the said Gardiner will consent to 
receive in payment for the same the S400 paid by said- Martin and a 
note for the remaining £200, to be signed by the Wardens in behalf 



^^/^' -rtw? S '"~~ wasa merchant - In 

y jLS ■ 6&&2--ej~7'Z- TTYaT^ — N the Revolution 
tered the of the Stat< , was appointed a captain in Col. Lippett's 

regiment, and was in the battle at Trenton. Aftei the wai he was ap- 
pointed adjutant-general and major-general oi the State militia, and re- 
peatedly represented the Town in the General Assembly. In 1811 he 
lected Lieutenant-Governor, and held the office till 1 1.6, when he 
declined a re-election. In 1817 he removed to Seekonk, where he died 

September 30, 1819. 

16 



234 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

of the congregation, payable at some distant period, say four or six 
months, with interest thereon. 

At the Annual Meeting, Easter Monday, April 19, 1802, the 
officers and vestry of the Church were re-elected. 

Voted : That Simeon Martin be added to the number of delegates 
to represent the Church at the next State Convention, and to the 
committee for ascertaining the bounds of the land between the 
Church and Miss Searing. 

The Rev. Mr. Brunson having been paid his salary to the 25th 
day of April, and given up his charge, as Assistant Minister and 
School-master, the Rev. Mr. Clement Merriam is admitted in his 
room, and his salary of $300, to commence from said 25th day of 
April, 1802. 

[June 21, 1802 : St. John's Day, the annual meeting of the Grand 
Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons was held at the State House ; 
after which the members marched to Trinity Church, where divine 
service was conducted by Rev. Mr. Merriam, followed by an oration 
delivered by Hon. William Hunter.] 

July 4, 1802. Richard Kidder Randolph 236 was married to Ann 
Maria Lyman. 

August 12, 1802. Whereas, the Rev. Mr. Merriam hath signified 
to the Vestry, by his note of July 20th, that it is his intention to 
resign his charge of the school and office of Assistant Minister of 
our Church, at the expiration of six months from the date thereof. 
Voted: that the Clerk of the Vestry, with the Wardens, be a com- 



286 Mr. Randolph was born in Virginia, October 19, 1781, and was 
the <ow of Payton and Lucy Randolph. He graduated at Harvard, and 
took up his residence in Newport in lSio. lie had a scat in the General 
Assembly, as Representative from Newport, for several years, and died in 
Newport, in March. [849. Mrs. Randolph was the daughter of Major 
Daniel Lyman, and was distinguished for her beauty. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 235 

mittee to inform Mr. Merriam, in reply thereto, that they received 
with concern his so sudden and unexpected notice of a determina- 
tion to leave us, at a time when our Rector was providentially 
absent ; and to inform him also that it is impracticable for the 
Church to comply with the terms since personally proposed by 
him for continuing with us, and therefore, however reluctantly, 
must accept of his resignation, leaving it entirely to himself to per- 
form whatever part of the service of the Church he may think 
propei, until his departure, or the return of our Rector. 

October 4, 1802. Voted: that Mr. Bours, with the Wardens, be 
a committee to endeavor to obtain an Assistant and School-master, 
in the room of Mr. Merriam, by such means as they may judge 
most advisable. 

October 11, 1802. Whereas, the Rev. Mr. Merriam hath again 
signified to the Vestry, that in consequence of ill health he is unable 
to attend to the duties of the Church and the care also of his s< hool, 
during the absence of our Rector, and is desirous of having an 
assistant in his school; it is therefore voted: that an allowance be 
made of S25.no per month, to any proper per, on he may procure 
as an assistant, or usher, during; the remaining part of the term 
he has consented to remain with us, agreeably to his note of the 
20th of July last. 

Meeting of the congregation, December 14, 1802. Whereas, the 
Rev. Mr. Dehon, our Rector, who has been long indisposed, hath 
signified to the congregation now assembled for the purpose, bv his 
note ol yesterday's date, " that the progress towards a confirmed 
state of health is so slow and unsteady as to afford but little hope 
oi his performing public service during the cold weather, and being 
advised by all the medical gentlemen who he has consulted, to try 
the efficacy of a warmer climate, and is therefore induced, with 
great reluctance, and after much hesitation, to ask have of absence 
during the winter season." 



236 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

It is voted and resolved : that the so reasonable request of our 
Rector be granted in its fullest extent, and that his salary be con- 
tinued and paid as tho' he was present, during his absence, most 
earnestly praying Almighty God to preserve his life, and to restore 
him again, in his own good time, in perfect health to his anxious 
flock. 

December 26, 1802. Whereas, the office of School-master and 
Assistant Minister will become vacant after the 25th day of January 
next, by the resignation of the Rev. Mr. Merriam, voted: that Mr. 
Bours be requested to write, by the first opportunity, to Mr. John 
Reed, Preceptor in the Academy in Plainfield, Connecticut, informing 
him of the nature of this office, and inviting him to enter on the 
discharge of its duties immediately after the said 25th day of Janu- 
ary, with the view to settlement in said office, provided it shall be 
found agreeable to both parties ; the terms of contract to be settled 
after conferring with Mr. Reed, and arranging matters relative to his 
receiving Holy Orders. 

Meeting of the congregation, February 1, 1803. Whereas, the 
time for which the Rev. Mr. Merriam contracted with the Rector, 
Wardens and Vestry to execute the office of School-master and 
Assistant Minister expired the 25th ult.,and the Church is now des- 
titute of both Rector and Assistant, the Rev. Mr. Dehon, in conse- 
quence of ill health, having obtained leave of absence from the con- 
gregation and gone on a voyage to the southward ; and whereas we 
conceive it would prove greatly injurious to the welfare and interest 
of the Church to be deprived altogether of a pastor ; therefore voted 
and resolved: that the Wardens wait upon Mr. Merriam, and invite 
him to remain with us three months longer, in order to keep the 
congregation together (independent of the school) by reading the 
Prayers and performing the other duties o( his office, as Deacon, and 
in a way the most easy and agreeable to himself; ,im\ that he be 
allowed and paid for his services the sum of one hundred and 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 237 

twenty-five dollars, at the expiration of said term of three months; 
and the Clerk of the Vest rj be desired to furnish the Wardens with 
a copy of this vote, to be delivered t<> Mr. Merriam. 

February 2, 1803. The following answei was this day received 
from the Rev. Mr. Merriam: 

To the Vestry and Wardens of Trinity Church. 
Gentlemen. 
The resolution of the congregation, whom 3 ou represent, was re- 
ceived with mingled emotions of gratitude and respect — of gratitude 
for their indulgence towards my past services, and kind invitation 
to continue longer with them in a more eligible capacity; of regret 
that their present embarrassment will not permit them to do justice 
to their feelings in offering a greater pecuniar)- satisfaction ; for I 
have a higher opinion of their generosity than to suppose they deem 
the sum which they have offend me an equivalent for discharging 
the duties of my profession. Impressed with these sentiments, and 
conceiving with them that it would prove greatly injurious to the 
welfare and interest of the Church to be deprived altogether of a 
Pastor, I cheerfully accept the terms proposed: lamenting not that 
my recompence is small, if it can be paid with the same pleasure 
with which my duties shall be performed. 

I am gent 1 " with the greatest respect, 

Your Most devoted Serv\ 



Gt£*^^i^^&y2^&>**i~. 



2i 3 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



CHAPTER XVI. 

1803-1806. 

Easter Monday, April 11, 1803. Samuel Whitehorne and Wil- 
liam Littlefield were chosen Wardens. The Vestrymen were the 
same, with the addition of Simeon Martin. 

Messrs. Champlin, Brinley, Gibbs, Auchmuty, Handy, Bours, 
Gardiner and Martin be continued delegates to the next State Con- 
vention. 

Voted : that the Wardens be requested to wait upon the Rev. 
Mr. Merriam and invite him to officiate for us for two months 
longer, on the terms allowed him by the congregation on the 1st of 
February last. 

May I, 1803. William R. Robinson and W m Crooke were chosen 
Wardens, in place of Messrs. Whitehorne and Littlefield, who de 
clined serving. 

June 27, 1803. Voted; that the Wardens be requested to settle 
with the Rev. Mr. Merriam, he having notified the congregation 
that he should leave them this week, and that the money be raised 
by subscription. Eighty dollars were paid Mr. Merriam, to pay 
Mr. Jabez Whitaker, as an assistant three months. 

Meeting of the congregation, August 7, 1803. Whereas, Daniel 
Vernon, sexton of the Church, hath resigned said office, voted : that 
Uriah Gorton be sexton for the remaining part of the year, to Easter 
Monday, and that he receive the same salary and all other privileges 
allowed to said Vernon. 

September 27, 1803. Voted: that a lot of land, of two acres. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 

situated on the Hill, in New port, and which is now offered for -5ale 
to the Church for S460, be purchased with the money for which the 
lot in the Church lane was sold to Simeon Martin ; the balance of 
S60 to be made up l>\ subscription, and that the rents and profits be 
appropriated to the sole use and benefit of the Rector for the time 
being, agreeably to the will of Nathaniel Norton. 

October 19, 1805. Rev. ('lenient Merriam was married to Eli 
beth Hastie. 

November 2, 1803. He it remembered that whereas the lot of 
land of two acres, purchased by Mr. Francis Brinley at public 
auction, has been generously given up to the Church for the same 
money he paid for it, in order to accommodate them ; it is to be 
understood, and it is the intent and meaning of the Vestry, that no 
buildings may be erected on said lot, whereby his rope-walk, or the 
adjoining buildings, may be endangered by fire, or in any other waj 
or manner, injured thereby. 

Voted: that the Rev d Mr. Dehon be requested to write to Mr. 
John Ward, at present residing in the town of Harrinton, Ct., who, 
we are informed, is a candidate for Holy Orders in the Episcopal 
Church, and inform him of the situation of our Church, and invite 
him to come to Newport, as soon as may be, in order that we may 
have a conference with him upon the subject of settling him as our 
Assistant Minister .md School-master. 

November 20, 1803. John Bernard Gilpin 231 was married to 
Marj E. Miller. 

December 5, 1803. Voted: that the Wardens wait upon Mi 



I Ir- President o\ the United States issued his exequatur, a< knowledg- 
\li Gilpin as British Vice Consul for Rhode Island and Connecticut. 
I Gilpin. died in [814, and was buried in the rhurch-yard, June 27th 
of that year. Mr. Gilpin died in Nova Scotia. Mrs. Gilpin was a daugh- 
ter of Capt. John Miller. 



2 4 o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

John Ward, who has come to Newport, in consequence of the in- 
vitation lately given him, and inform him that the Vestry have 
agreed to pay him at the rate of $25 per month, being the same sum 
allowed the Rev d Mr. Brunson and the Rev d Mr. Merriam for their 
services during the absence of the Rector, and until it is ascertained 
whether a permanent settlement takes place with us, on Mr, Kay's 
foundation. 

February 6, 1804. Whereas, Mr. John Ward, who has officiated 
in the Church as a Lay Reader, since the absence of the Rev d Mr. 
Dehon, has signified to the Vestry that he is under the necessity of 
returning home within a few days, and that he will soon after arriv- 
ing there and consulting his friends, resolve whether he will accept 
of our invitation given him some time past, to a permanent settle- 
ment, as School-master and Assistant Minister, on Mr. Kay's dona- 
tion, voted : that he be paid $100 for his services since he has been 
with us, including his travelling expenses to and from Newport, out 
of the rent due from Richard Harrison, Esq., and that he be requested 
to tarry with us two Sundays more, before he sets out on his 
journey. 

Voted : that Mr. Bours, with the Wardens, furnish Mr. Ward with 
letters of presentation to Bishop Jarvis, 238 in order to enable him to 
obtain Deacon's Orders, upon his acceptance of the permanent set- 
tlement of School-master and Assistant Minister, which has been 
offered him. 

March 19, 1804. Mr. John Ward having declined the offer made 



*0 * LV , ' Right Rev d Bishop 

-^^^/^jX/^Jm^^^ — " -— "* J arvis was bom at Nor- 

& walk, Ct., in 1739, and 

died in 1813. He graduated at Vale College in i76i,andwas elected 

Bishop of Connecticut in 1797. He preached the funeral sermon of 

Bishop Seabury. and became his successor as Bishop. 



\ / ■■// PORT, I'll OH !■ ISLAND. 241 

him, voted: that Mr. Bours be requested to write to Mr. John Reed, 

at and inquire of him whether he is disengaged, and will, 

upon receiving a proper and regular invitation, enter into Holy 
Orders, and become our Assistant Minister and School-master 

Easter Monday, April 2, 1804. \V" Littlefield and W Wood 
elected Warden-. Mr. George Gibbs was added to the Vestn 

April 30, 1804. Voted: that the Wardens, with Mr. Champlin 
and Mr. Bours, be a committee to make inquiry relative to the pro- 
curing a new bell for the Church, in the room of the one which has 
hung therein and in use for sixty-three \ ears, and now appears of a 
sudden to be cracked, and is become useless. 

The committee appointed on the 5th of December last, to inquire 
into the state and situation of the lots at the south end ot Thames 
Street, part of Mr. Kay's donation, having verbally reported to the 
Vestry that they had performed said duty, and are clearly of the 
opinion that it would be greatly to the advantage of said donation, 
and much better to answer the design of the pious and benevolent 
donor, to dispose of said lots and purchase with the proceeds a lot 
of land, or other real estate, in the Town of Newport ; it is, there 
fore, voted and resolved: that \Ym. Hunter, Esq., be requested to 
draft a petition to the General Assembly, in the name of the Rector, 
Wardens and Vestry, to be presented .it the next session, for per- 
mission to dispose of said lots foi the most they will sell for, and to 
purchase other real estate with the proceeds, and that General 
Martin be desired to present the same. 

May 31, 1804. Whereas, the committee chosen at our last meet- 
ing, to make inquiry relative to the procuring .1 new bell, have now 
made report that they have attended to said duty, by applying to 
the several bell founders in Boston, and the State of Connecticut, to 
know the lowest terms on which they would undertake to recast 
the old bell, and whereas it appears from the documents, now laid 
before us by the committee, that the most eligible terms are re- 



242 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

ceived from John Morgan, Esq., at Hartford ; therefore voted and 
resolved ; that the said committee be requested to ship the bell by 
the first conveyance to Hartford, by water, first having her weighed ; 
and that they use their endeavors to have her recast, and returned 
to us as soon as possible. And the Wardens are further requested to 
take out a subscription, in order to raise money to pay the expense. 

A letter wrote by the committee to Mr. Morgan, at Hartford, 
requesting his further assistance with regard to the bell, being read, 
was approved of, and the committee desired to forward the same 
by the first mail."*' 

July 2, 1804. Whereas, the petition from the Vestry to the Gen- 
eral Assembly, for permission to dispose of the lots at the south 
end of Thames Street, has not been granted, therefore voted : that 
the Wardens, with Messrs. Sherburne, Bours and Francis Malbone, 
be a committee to make particular inquiry into the state and situa- 
tion of said lots, and report as soon as may be to the Vestry their 
opinion what ought to be done with them, to promote in the best 
manner the charitable design of the donor. 

August 6, 1804. The committee appointed at the last meeting 
reported that they had caused the lots to be surveyed and a plat 



" 9 In June, 1804, the committee accepted the bid of Fenner & Crocker, 
bell founders, at Hartford ; the work of moulding and lasting a new bell 
to be done by Mr. Doolittle, who had a good reputation in that line. 
The old bell was to be used as far as it would go, and the new metal to 
bring it up to the required weight, was to be furnished by the contractors. 

In giving their orders, the committee wrote to the contractors: "We 
are extremely anxious to have another [bell] as near as possible like her ; 
we must, therefore, enjoin it upon the founder that she be recast in the 
same mould and form, of the same metal and thickness, and in every 
particular as exactly as may be like her; it being the opinion of several 
persons, who are supposed to be good judges, that its shape in a great 
measure contributed to its loud and melodious tone." 

The bell, when cast, weighed twelve hundred pounds. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 243 

made thereof. Voted: that the said committee ascertain what, in 
tin ir opinion, may be the value of each and every lot to be disposed 
of for the money, on a lease to be given by the Vestry for the term 
ot nine hundred and ninety-nine years ; and that Tate's rotate be 
included likewise in said estimate, and report their doings to the 
Vestry at their next meeting for their concurrent e. 

August 14, 1804. Voted : that the thanks of the Vestry be pre 
sentcd tn Mr. fabez Dennison for his obliging' attention to our re- 
quest to take a survey of the Church lots at the south end ol rhames 
street, ami presenting us with a plat of the same, without an\ 1 om 
pensation for his trouble; and that the clerk present him with a 
copy of this vote. 

Voted: that the report of the committee appointed at our last 
meeting t<> ascertain the value of the lots at the south end of Thames 
street, be accepted, and that the same gentlemen, with the addition 
of Mr. Win. R. Robinson, be continued a committee to dispose of 
said lots, agreeably to said report, ami that they inform the Vestry, 
from time to time, of their proceedings in the business. 

September •;, [804. Whereas the church bell hath been recast, 
and is now replaced, as formerly, 

Voted : that the sexton ring her as usual, at sunrise, one of the 
clock, p.m., and at nine in the evening, and that he be permitted to 
raise money by a general subscription, t<> reward him tor doing the 
same. 

Berkenhead, 240 who has officiated on the orgui for several •. car; 
past, having suddenly left the Town and Church, 



240 ). L. Berkenhcad, who was blind, and who was fai from reliable, 
was admitted to be a very good organist when at his best, but his habits 
were >uch that he was elected organist from year to year "on his good 
behavior." He had no difficulty in securing pupils, when he chose to 
give them proper attention. He died in October, 1810. 



244 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted: that inquiry be made for a suitable person to succeed 
him. 

October I, 1804. Voted : that the rent of the church lots at the 
south end of Thames street, if not previously sold at the valuation 
reported by the committee, be fixed, after the expiration of their 
present parole leases, at the lawful interest of the sum they were re- 
spectively rated at ; except lot No. 1 and half of No 2 together, at 
#24. 

November 5, 1804. Voted : that the Wardens settle the accounts 
standing between the Church and Mr. Joseph Dyer respecting the 
house and lot he has occupied for several years past, which was be- 
queathed to the poor of the Church by William Tate, and that in 
said settlement they ascertain what is now due to the poor trom the 
Church on account of said estate. 

Voted : that the committee take into consideration the circum- 
stances attending the Tate estate, and make inquiry whether said 
estate can be also disposed of on a long lease, as well as the lots 
not yet disposed of in that way. 

Voted : that the above committee dispose of one-fourth part of 
the lot adjoining eastward the lot on which Daniel Ginnedo has a 
dwelling-house standing, to said Ginnedo, provided he purchase the 
half lot on which said house stands. 

November 26, 1804. Whereas the church bell, which has been 
lately recast, has again become useless in consequence of a crack, 
voted: that Mr. Bours write a letter to Mr. Stanley Carter, a bell- 
founder at Raynham, State of Massachusetts, and invite him to 
come to Newport, in order that we may confer with him upon 
the subject of recasting it at his foundry. 

December 3, 1804. The committee reported the following val- 
uation of the lots at the south end of Thames street, to be dis- 
posed of for the money, on a lease of nine hundred and ninety- 
nine years, and their report agreed to by the Vestry. 



NEWPORT. RHODE ISLAND. 

No. i. 2V At present occupied by John Whitehorne, i 

" 2. One-half. " I 

The other half (No. 2) by Daniel Ginnedo, 

3. Unimproved, ...... 

4. Improved by Win. Gyles' heirs, 

5. " " John Howard, . 
6. & 7. " John Price, | 

10. " ' 







45 


$ 


335 


OO 


. 


So 


OO 




[60 


OO 


. 


160 


OO 


• 


140 


OO 




258 


OO 




67 


OO 


$ 


1200 


OO 



January 14, 1805. A communication being received from the 
Rev. William Patten, conveying in behalf of the committee of the 
Second Congregational Church and Society, an offer of the use of 
the bell belonging to said "Church and Society, to the Rector, 
Wardens and Vestry of Trinity Church, till the loss sustained in 
the fracture of their own may be replaced," resolved unanimously 
that the thanks of this body be given to the said committee for the 
very friendly and obliging offer, of which we should gladly avail 
ourselves, if a previous arrangement had not been made for placing 
the school-house bell in the belfry of the Church, for the present 
use of the Society. 

Resolved also : that the Rev. Air. Dehon be requested to trans- 
mit to the Rev. William Patten a copy of this resolution. 

Voted: that the report of the committee, presented at our last 



241 I o( No. 1 and half of No. 1 leased to John (1. Whitehorne for 999 
'"' $335 ; half of lot No. 2 and lot No. 3 leased to Daniel Ginnedo 

for $240; No. 4 leased to Charles Gyles \ No. 5 to William Howard. 
Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9 leased to William Wilder; No. 10 to Arnold Hiseox. 



246 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 

meeting, upon the Tate 242 estate, be accepted ; the statement made 
of the account between the Church and said estate be entered in the 
ledger by the Clerk, and that the sum of ten dollars be paid 
annually to the poor of the Church, at Christmas, after this year, 
agreeably to said report. 

243 William Tate's will was dated June 7, 1758. The following is the 
clause in which Trinity Church was interested : 

" Item. I give and .bequeath to my well beloved wife, Mary Tate, all 
my estate, real and personal, for and during the term of her natural life, 
to her only proper use and behoof. 

" And my will further is, that if my said wife shall think it needful to 
sell and dispose of my messuage, or dwelling house, where I now live at 
Newport, aforesaid, together with the lot of land whereon the same stands, 
together with the buildings, improvements and appurtenances to the same 
belonging, then I give her full power and authority to grant, bargain and 
sell the same to any person or persons that shall purchase it, and to sign, 
seal and duly execute a good deed of conveyance thereof in fee simple, 
which shall be for the maintenance of my said wife during her life ; and 
after the decease of my said wife, what shall be then remaining of my 
said estate I give and bequeath the same unto the poor people then be- 
longing to the Church of England, in Newport, aforesaid, to be dis- 
tributed to and among them, in equal parts and proportions, by such per- 
son or persons as my said wife shall nominate and appoint for that 
purpose." 

William Tate was married to Mary Jverson, May 21, 1 731 . He was a 
blacksmith. Mrs. Tate died in the autumn of 1780, leaving no instruc- 
tions as to who should distribute the estate. What disposition was made 
of the property after her death cannot now be ascertained. The Revo- 
lution was not closed, and probably the estate was but of little value for 
some time after that date. April 5, 1798, it was rented to Joseph Dyer 
at $30 per annum, the Church to keep it in repair. The rent was paid 
up to December 25, 1804, and after deducting the expense of repairs, the 
Church realized but $164.72 for the six years and more that it had been 
so occupied. In 1806 the property was leased to John Yeomans, for 99Q 
years, the consideration being $800, which sum was placed to the credit 
of the poor fund. But the Church did not realize more than $700 on 
the notes given by Yeomans, which sum was invested in the " Clarke 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 



247 



Feb. 19, 1805. Voted, that the terms proposed by Fenton & 
Cochran, of New Haven, to cast a lull of new materials, be ac- 
1 epted, and that Mr. Hours, with the Wardens, write to them by the 
next mail, advising them thereof, and that the cracked bell shall be 
sent on to New York and delivered to theii order, as soon a- the 
weathei will admit of the packel passing with safety. 

Voted : that the several lots of land at the south end of the Town 
be advertised in the Newport Mercury, to b< iold at public auction, 
on the "Mli day of Man h next, unles: previously disposed of at 
private sale. 

Meeting of the congregation, March 3, 1S05. The gentlemen of 
the Vestry having reported thai they had made a contract with 
\[. 3 rs. Fenton & Cochran to cast a bell of the same weight of the 
old one, of entirely new materials, they agreeing to receive the one 
recast at Hartford in part pay. Voted: that the congregation ap 
prove of their doings, and that Messrs. Jacob Smith and Peleg 
Wood, |t\, be requested to solicit contributions from the congrega- 
tion to pay for the same. 243 



lot," so called, on Catharine Street. In April, [822, the Vestry ordered 
the sale of the •'Clarke lot," at not less than $600; but the committee 
to whom the matter was intrusted, saw fit to lease it to Thomas Harkness, 
for 999 years, for the sum of $645. The substitution of a lease for a fee 
simpl< deed had the tacit approval of the Vestry; which body subse- 
quentl) made good the loss that had been sustained and passed S'Soo to 
the credit of the poor fund. This sum is intact to the presenl daj 
March, 1S05. List of subscribers for the new hell: 



] ram is Brinley, 


. $10.00 


Thos. Dennis, 




. $8 - 


Christ. Champlin, 


20.00 


Steph. T. Nor 


tham, . 


5.00 


J. Bours, . 


10.00 


Saml. Brow ne 




. 


< !aleb ' 1-ardner, 


10.00 


Win. < !rooke, 




5.00 


Sim. Martin. 


8.00 


J. Bours, Jr.. 




. 


1'. Wood, Jr., . 


<S.oo 


J . Gilpin, 




5.00 


Ja< "1> Smith. 


10.00 


Edw. Easton, 




5.00 



248 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



March 4, 1805. Voted: that the Wardens execute a lease for the 
term of nine hundred and ninety-nine years, of the house and lot 
given by William Tate, late of Newport, in his last will and testa- 
ment, for the benefit of the poor of our Church, to Mr. John Yeo- 
mans, upon said Yeomans paying the sum of eight hundred dol- 
lars, by two notes of hand, payable at one of the banks of Newport, 
one for four hundred dollars, payable with interest, in one year, and 
the other for the same sum, with interest likewise, in two years from 
the date of the said lease. 

Voted : that the advertising the several lots of land at the south 
end of the Town, to be sold at public auction on the 25th of this 
month, agreeably to a resolve of the Vestry at their last meeting, be 
omitted as unnecessary. 



John Crooke, . 
John Wood, 
Tho. Arnold, 
Geo. Champlin, 
Wm. Miller, 
Mary Gibbs, 
Wm. Wilder, . 
Tho. R. Gardner, 
Benj. Gardiner, 
Silas Dean, 



$5.00 Edward Brinley, 

10.00 j John L. Boss, 

5.00 W. Wood, 

8.00 Mr. Hynde, 

5.00 Mrs. Malbone, 

20.00 Steph. Deblois, 

2.00 Wm. C. Baen, 

2.00 Ann Robinson, 

5.00 Mrs. F. Malbone, 

5.00 ' Edw d T. Waring,' 



55.00 
5.00 
5.00 
3.00 
5.00 
3.00 
2.00 
3.00 
5.00 
<;.oo 




Dr. Edmund Thomas 
Waring was born at 
Charleston, S. C, De- 
cember 25, 1779, came 
to Newport, studied med- 
icine with Dr. Isaac Sen- 
ter, and here opened an office and devoted himself to his profession, which 
he followed for more than thirty years. He was one of the founders of 
the Rhode Island Medical Society, in which society he held an office for 
a number of years. He died at Charleston, January 21, 1835, and his re- 
mains were brought to Newport and laid in the grave in which his wife, 
daughter of Francis Malbone, had been placed twelve years before. 



NEWPORT. RJlOm- ISLAND. 



249 



April 1, 1805. Whereas, the Vestry has been informed through 
the Rev a Mr. Griswokl, of Bristol, that Mr. John Ward, of Litch- 
field, Ct, who has formerly officiated in this Church as a lay 
reader, would, upon receiving an invitation, accept the office of As- 
sistant Minister and School-master. 

Voted : that he be invited to said office, and requested to qualify 
himself by taking Hol\- Orders, as soon as ma)' be, for discharging 



Henry Sherburne, 


$5-°° 


M. Duncan, 


4.00 


Mrs. B. Mum ford, 


5.00 


Tho. Townsend, 


5.00 


Wm. Hunter, . 


5.00 


J. E. Scott, 


5.00 


Nath. Hazard, . 


5.00 


Saml. Lawton, . 


3.00 


S. Malbone, 


2.00 


M. Scott, 


3.00 


John Boit, 


2.00 


Wm. Bretton, . 


2.00 


Freeman Mayberry, . 


2.00 


Mrs. N. Miller, 


3.00 


William Littlefield, . 


5.00 


Saml. Whitehorne, . 


3.00 




$281.00 


Deduct not paid, 


10.00 



Fenton & Cochran's bill. $257.03 
Freight paid Holt, . 6.00 

W . Gorton, for collecting, 



$271.00 



75 



Balance carried to credit 
of Trinity Church, 



$263.78 



7.22 



$271.00 
Newport, October 21, 1805. 

E. E., per J. Bours. 



The bell weighed 1375 pounds, and was the one hundred and fifteenth 
bell that had been cast in the same foundry during a period of ten years. 
When delivered, it was seen that the metal, in cooling, had shrunk in the 
upper part of the crown, which disfigured it ; and there were some blotches 
on the rim, caused by the scaling of the mould ; but as there was nothing 
objectionable in the sound of the bell, the committee accepted it. 

17 



250 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

the duties thereof. Voted also : that the Rev d Mr. Dehon be de- 
sired to transmit to Mr. Ward a copy of this vote, and to require of 
him an early answer. 

Voted : that the lots at the south end of the Town, which remain 
undisposed of, be advertised to be sold at public auction, notwith- 
standing the resolution of the Vestry to the contrary, at a meeting 
February 19th last, and that the Wardens give notice thereof, with 
the time and place, in the next Newport Mercury. 

Easter Monday, April 15, 1805. William Littlefield and William 
Wood were elected Wardens. 

Vestrymen : Francis Brinley, Christ. Champlin, John Bours, 
Francis Malbone, Benj. Gardiner, Henry Sherburne, John Handy, 
William Littlefield, Rob. N. Auchmuty, Saunders Malbone, Wm. 
Crooke, Simeon Martin, Peleg Wood, Jr., and Caleb Gardner. 

John Bours, Clerk of the Vestry ; Joseph Dyer, Clerk of the 
Church ; Uriah Gorton, Sexton. 

Delegates to the Convention the same as last year. 

May 6, 1805. Whereas, an opportunity presents for purchasing 
a lot of land, of ten acres, belonging to Mr. Henry Bliss, with the 
money for which the lots at the south end of the Town, part of Mr. 
Kay's donation, were rated at, and most of them sold for, voted : 
that the Wardens, with Caleb Gardner, Esq., and Mr. Francis Mal- 
bone, be a committee to purchase said lot, upon the best terms they 
can, and that they, or the major part of them, be empowered in behalf 
of the Vestry, to obtain the cash to pa)' for the same from the banks 
in Newport, and that the said committee be indemnified by the 
Rector, Wardens and Vestry, as trustees of Mr. Kay's donation, in 
transacting said business. 

A letter being read from Mr. John Ward to the Rev d Mr. Dehon, 
informing him that he has connected himself with the Church in 
East Windsor for five months, at the expiration of which time he 
would accept the office of Assistant Minister and School-master for 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 251 

this Chinch, voted unanimously: that the Rev* Mr. Dehon be re- 
quested to inform Mr. Ward that we will offer the vacancy to no 
other candidate, and at the close of his present engagement shall be 
happy to receive his services. 

June 3, 1805. Voted: that Messrs. Sherburne and Francis M 1] 
bone be a committee to apply to Wm. Hunter, Esq., now a member 
to the General Assembly ol this State, and request the favor of him 
to renew an application, which was made to them the last year, for 
permission to dispose of the Church lots at the south end of the 
Town, in order to purchase other real estate with the proceeds of 
the same, and that said committee use their influence to obtain 
such act. 

The following Act was obtained: 

State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantation, In General 
Assembly, June session, A.I). [805. 

Upon the petition of Theodore Dehon, the Minister, and of the 
Church Wardens and Vestry of Trinity Church, in Newport, pray- 
ing, for certain reasons therein stated, that they may be authorized 
and empowered to sell certain lots of land in Newport, heretofore 
devised by Nathaniel Kay, now deceased, to the' Minister, Warden 
and Vestry of said Church, for the education of ten poor boys in 
grammar and the mathematics, and vest the proceeds of said sale in 
other and more productive lands, to the same use ; Resolved : that 
the prayer of said petitioners be granted, and that the said Minister, 
Wardens and Vestry be, and they are hereby authorized and empow- 
ered, b) r the advice and direction of the Court of Probate for said 
Newport, to make sale of said lots of land upon the most advan- 
tageous terms they can obtain for the same ; provided the said 
Minister, Wardens and Vestry shall give bonds to the satisfaction ol 
said Court of Probate, that they will, within twelve months after said 
sale, invest the proceeds thereof in other lands on the Island of Rhode 
Island, to the s. line u ;e .trusts and purposes, as the said lots of land, 
so to be sold, were de\ ised to, and for, in and by the said will of said 
Kay ; and that a deed, or deeds, made of said lots to any purchaser, or 



252 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

purchasers, shall vest in him, her, them and his or their heirs, or 

assigns, a fee simple estate therein. 

A true Copy. 

Witness, Samuel Eddy, Secretary. 

July 25, 1805. Whereas the purchase of a lot of land, of ten 
acres, belonging to the late Henry Bliss, was not effected, agreeably 
to a resolve of the Vestry, on the 6th of May last, Voted : that the 
Wardens, with Col. Sherburne and Capt. Caleb Gardner, be a com- 
mittee to look out a suitable lot, and when they find one which they 
think will answer, to make report to the Vestry. 

The committee appointed to examine the Church, with reference 

to needed repairs and painting, reported, July 28, 1805, "that it be 

recommended to the congregation to levy a tax on the pews below of 

$10 each, and on the pews in the gallery $1 each ; also, such pews as 

have become forfeited to the Church should be sold. These modes 

we think the most eligible for raising the sum necessary to defray the 

expense of repairing and painting the Church, &c, which we estimate 

at $1100. 

Henry Sherburne, 

Fran. Malbone, 

Wm. Crooke. 

Voted, July 25th : that the report be accepted, and that the sum 
of ten dollars be assessed on each single pew below , and one dollar on 
each pew in the gallery (a double pew $20,00, anc j a p eu - anc j a } ia [f 
#15.00), the same to be collected as soon as possible. 

July 28, 1805. Buried Don Josef Wiseman.- 4 ' Aged 46 years. 

September 1, 1805. Whereas, Caleb Gardner, Esq., has reported 



*** Don Josef was Vice Consul to the port of Newport from his Catholic 
Majesty. He came here in 1795, was warmly received, made many friends, 
and here resided up to the time of his death. 



NEWPORT, RHODE TST.AND. 253 

to the Vestry that he has purchased at public auction, this <Jav, the 
lot of land belonging t<> the estate of Henry Bliss, Esq., which the 
Vestry had appointed a committee to purchase before said Bliss's 
death, but were disappointed in so doing, at the rate of $139 per 
acre, the same to be surveyed and the number of acres as< ertained, 
Voted: that the thanks of the Vestry be presented to Mr. Gardner 
for his kind services in negotiating tin- business, and that he be 
further requested to assist the Clerk and Wardens in making the 
necessary arrangements to pay for the same. 

Voted : the sum of $300, being one year's rent of the estate leased 
to Richard Harrison, Esq., becoming due, and to be paid by Mr. 
Pollock, the present tenant, the 25th day of the present month, be 
appropriated towards payment of the above mentioned lot. 

Voted : that the three-fourth parts- 4 ^ of lot No. 3 remaining unsold, 
be disposed of by the committee for the most they can obtain for 
the same, as the_\' find it will not sell at the valuation formerly agreed 
upon by them. 

October 7, 1805. Whereas, the Wardens have reported to the 
Vestry that they have received a deed of the lot of land which we 
were about purchasing of the late Henry Bliss, Esq., from his ex- 
ecutor, Mr. Clarke Bliss, and after having the same recorded by the 
Town Clerk, had paid said Clarke Bliss $800 in part; and as some 
difficulty had arisen with Sarah Bliss, widow of said Henry, with 
regard t<> her right of dower, they had retained, in securities, in the 
hands of the Clerk of the Vestry, the sum of $381.50, for which 
they have given their obligation payable to said Clarke, with interest 
thereon, upon his obtaining and delivering to them a quit-claim, or 



''' The above-mentioned " three-fourth parts " of lot No. 3 was sold to 
Daniel Ginnedo for $90, and a deed of it was given n> him, together with 
a deed of the lot that he already held on a long lease, and for which he 
had paid the stipulated sum. 



254 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

good and sufficient release from the said widow to her said right of 
dower. 

Voted : that said report be accepted, and the doings of the War- 
dens in said business approved of and fully ratified by the Vestry. 

Whereas, Mr. Moses Seixas hath represented to the Vestry that 
he, in behalf of the Hebrew Congregation in this Town, is about 
making an exchange of a small piece of land, which now forms part 
of the burial-ground belonging to said congregation, for part of the 
estate leased by the Vestry to Richard Harrison, PLsq., June I, a.d. 
1796, and requesting the Vestry to ratify and confirm said ex- 
change, 

Voted and resolved : that if such exchange should take place, 
and the estate leased, as above said, to the said Harrison, should 
ever by any means revert to us, or our successors, we do, in that 
case, covenant and engage with the said Hebrew Congregation, for 
ourselves and our successors, that such exchange shall be fully rat- 
ified and confirmed to all intents and purposes for which it was 
made. 

Voted: that if any person who has purchased one of the Church 
lots, on a lease for 999 years, should apply for a deed in fee simple, 
it shall be given to him, provided no expense shall accrue to the 
Church in consequence thereof. 

Voted: that Simeon Martin, Esq., be added to the Wardens and 
Clerk to receive the new bell and settle for it. 

October 16, 1805. The new bell, weighing 1375 pounds, neat, 
was this day received, and immediately hung in the belfry. Pay- 
ment was made for the same with money raised by subscription, 
viz: £263.03, besides tin- bell which was recast by Doolittle which 
was credited in part. The whole cost was $5 4-53- 

November 4, 1805. The Rev d Mr. Dehon having laid before the 
Vestry a letter he had lately received from the Rex . Mr. John Ward, 
of Litchfield, and the contents thereof being duly considered; voted 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND 255 

unanimously, that the Rev 1 Mr. Dehon be requested to reply to 
saul letter, and to inform Mr. Ward that the Vestrj will readily r< - 
ceive him as m\ Assistant Minister to our Rector, and will engage 
that he shall be paid annually the sum of three hundred and fifty 
dollars, besides the use or rent of the Church school-house, on con- 
dition that he assist the Rector in performing the duties of the 
Church, in such manner as may be agreed upon by the Rector and 
himself; and shall instruct, or cause to be instructed, ten poor 
children in grammar and the mathematics gratis, agreeably to Mr. 
Kay's donation. 

January 29, 1S06. Thomas Tromp Tyrrell 246 was buried. 

March 3, [806. Whereas the Rev. Mr. John Ward arrived in 
Town in December List, in consequence of the invitation given him 
by the Vestry, 

Voted : that his salary commence from the 25th day of said No- 
vember last, 1805. 

Voted: that the Wardens be requested to pay our Rector, as 
soon as they are in cash, $24, the interest on the Wheatley bond, 
and the $10 due on account of the Tate estate, to Christmas last, to 
the poor of the Church, in order that the said two sums be divided 
among them, agreeably to the design and meaning of said dona- 
tions. 

The money was so paid the following day: 

Whereas, the Rev' 1 Mr. Dehon has informed the Vestry, that at 
the last Christmas festival he received from Mrs. Catherine Malbone 



'"' Mr. Tyrrell was bom in Jamaica. In his youth lie w.is sent to New- 
port to be educated. He then returned to Jamaica, where he amassed a 
handsome property. When he retired from business he returned to New- 
port, and here married the widow of John Grimes in 1S03. Mrs. Tyrrell 
died in 1830, at an advanced age, and was buried in the same grave with 
her husband in the chun h yard 



256 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

a valuable silver cup, for the use of the altar of Trinity Church ; 
resolved unanimously, that the thanks of this Vestry, in their own 
behalf, and in behalf of the congregation, be presented to Mrs. Mal- 
bone for this generous benefaction ; and that the Wardens be re- 
quested to have engraved thereon the name of the donor, and the 
date of the donation, that the remembrance of such distinguished 
piety and liberality may descend, with the cup, to posterity. 



XFWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 257 



CHAPTER XVII. 
1806-1810. 

At a meeting of the Congregation of Trinity Church, on Easter 
Monday, April 7, 1806, were chosen William Littlefield and William 
Wood, Wardens. 

Vestry. Francis Brinley, John Bours, Francis Malbone, Benjamin 
Gardiner, Henry Sherburne, John Handy, William Crooke, William 
Littlefield, Robert N. Auchmuty, Saunders Malbone, Simeon Mar- 
tin, William Wood, Peleg Wood, Edward Brinley, and John C. 
Scott. 

John Bouts, Clerk of Vestry; John Dyer, Clerk of Church; 
Uriah Gorton, Sexton. 

Voted : that the former salary of thirty dollars per annum to the 
Clerk of the Church be continued and paid; and the same sum of 
thirty dollars per annum to the Sexton. 

Voted : that Messrs. Brinley, Bours, Auchmuty, Gardiner and 
William Hunter be continued delegates to the next State Conven- 
tion, and requested to attend whenever called upon. 

Voted : that the same tax as the last year be continued, viz.. : 
ten dollars per annum on the single pews below ; fifteen dollars on 
those of one and a half, and twenty dollars on the double pews ; and 
four dollars on each of the gallery pews: the one-third part for the 
support of the Rector, and the other two-thirds part for paying the 
salaries of the other officers, and repairs of the Church. 

Voted : that the Rector, Wardens and Vestry be requested to use 
their endeavors to obtain an organist. 

Voted: Messrs. Sherburne, Martin and Hunter be a committee 



258 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

to petition the Legislature of the State to pass an act similar to 
that granted to the First Congregational Society in New York, to 
enable our Church to collect the taxes assigned on the pews. Said 
act was passed at the October session, 1805. 

At a Vestry meeting, April 14, 1806, at Mr. Francis Brinley's, 
Voted: that Messrs. Sherburne, Crooke and William Wood, with 
Mr. Bours, be a committee to purchase a lot of land, of three and 
one-quarter of an acre, on the hill, of Lawrence Clarke, provided 
the same can be had at a rate that will yield six per cent, per 
annum, interest on the purchase money, and payment made out of 
the notes received from John Yeomans and Henry Moore, for the 
Tate lot sold Yeomans. 

Voted: That the Wardens proceed in having the fences made 
about the parsonage-lot, as soon as may be, at the expense of the 
Church. 

At a meeting of the Vestry, May 5, 1806, at Mr. Bours's, 

Voted : that Mr. Benjamin Gardiner be added to the committee 
chosen to lease the lot purchased of Lawrence Clarke. Voted : that 
Mr. Gorton, the sexton of the Church, have permission to new 
shingle the west side of the house he occupies, at the expense of 
the Church, under the direction of the Wardens. 

Voted : that Mr. John G. Whitehorne, who, we are informed, is 
going to Philadelphia in the first packet, be requested to use his 
endeavors to obtain in that city, or elsewhere, an organist for the 
Church, if a person qualified for the office, and of a good moral 
character, can be had for one hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 247 . 



247 Berkenhead, the organist, had been discharged, on account of his 
infirmity. He sent a piteous appeal to the Vestry, begging to be restored, 
and promising amendment in the future, but he failed repeatedly to make 
good his promise, and it was decided to senile some one to fill his place. 
Mr. Whitehorne was probably as well qualified as any one in the Vestry 
to select an organist. He understood music, and had built a parlor 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 259 

At a meeting of the Vestry, May I \ [806, at Mr. Bours, Voted: 
that the Wardens he requested and empowered, in behalf of the 
Rector, Wardens and Vestry of the Church, to sign .1 note of hand 
to Lawrence < larl e, 01 order, for the sum of three hundred and 
forty-six dollars, payable within three years from the date thei 
for the balance due to him for a lot of land purchased of him with 
money arising from the sale of a house and lot of land in Newport, 
bequeathed by William Tate, late of Newport, in his last will and 
testament, for the benefit of the poor of said Church. 

At a meeting of the Vestry, May 27, 1S06, at Col. Sher- 
burne's : 

The Rev' 1 Mr. Dehon having laid before the Vestry a letter re- 
ceived from the Rev' John S. I. Gardiner, Rector of Trinity Church, 
Boston, upon the subject of our Church joining in convention with 
the churches in the State of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, for 
the purpose of choosing a Bishop, Voted: that Mr. Dehon be re- 
quested to return answer to Mr. Gardiner, and inform him that 
his letter shall be laid before our State Convention at its next 
meeting. 

Whereas the lot of land, of which Lawrence Clarke, and Hannah, 
his wife, have executed a d<ic(\ of conveyance, bearing date the 
nineteenth day of the present month, to the Rector, Wardens and 
Vestry of this Church, was purchased with money arising from the 
sale of a house and a lot of land in Newport, given by William 

organ, which, it' it larked qualities looked for in the work of more ex- 
perienced hands, bore evidence of mechanical skill and perseverance. 
II* and his brother Samuel, with whom he was in business, were promi- 
nent men, both in the communitj and the Church. Samuel repeatedly 
served the Church as Senior Warden ; and when Zion Church was or- 
ganized he took an active and leading part in that parish. He married 
Eliza Rathbone, AugUSl 24, 1802, and John married Harriet Greene Mal- 
bone, daughter of Col. John Malbone, December 16, 1798. 



260 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Tate, late of said Newport, in his last will and testament, to and for 
the sole benefit of the poor belonging to this Church, Voted, there- 
fore : that the rents and profits of said lot be appropriated to the 
charitable and benevolent purpose for which it was designed by the 
testator ; and that the same be distributed yearly, and every year 
forever, among the poor belonging to this Church, at the discretion 
of the Rector and Wardens for the time being ; and that this Reso- 
lution be entered by the Clerk of the Vestry upon said deed, and 
that he be requested also to cause the same to be recorded by the 
Town Clerk of Newport, as well as in the book of records belong- 
ing to the Church, in order that a punctual compliance with the will 
of the said testator, as far as in the power of the Vestry, may 
be observed and religiously attended to by them and their suc- 
cessors. 

At a meeting of the Vestry, June 2, 1806, at Mr. Saunders 
Malbone's : 

Mr. Benj. Gardiner having reported to the Vestry that he had 
agreed with Mr. Clarke Bliss upon the division line between the 
Church lot, lately purchased of said Bliss, and his own land, Voted : 
that the said report be accepted, and signed by the Wardens on the 
part of the Vestry, and afterwards entered on the Church book of 
records ; and also on the records of the Town of Newport, to 
prevent any dispute hereafter with regard to said division line. 

The agreement was as follows : 

Articles of agreement, made the thirtieth day of May, in the year 
of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and six, between the Rec- 
tor, Wardens and Vestry of Trinity Church, in Newport, of the one 
part, and Clarke Bliss, of said Newport, yeoman, of the other part, 
Witnesseth : that whereas a lot of land of eight acres and one-half 
acre, lately purchased by the said Rector, Wardens and Vestry, ad- 
joining other land now belonging to him, the said Bliss, It is mutu- 
ally agreed by the parties that they shall make and maintain a good 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISl \ND. 261 

and lawful fence on the line between the said lot and said Bliss land, 
in the manner following, vi/. : The lot belonging to the said Rector, 
Wardens and Vestry, shall begin at the north end of the said line 
fence, and extend southerly on said line thirty-six rods, at the end 
of which, the said Bliss shall begin and extend southerly and east- 
erly about twenty-four rods, to land belonging to Asa Shaw, all 
which said fence to be made and maintained by the said Rector, 
Wardens and Vestry, and by their successors in said office; and the 
said Bliss, his heirs, and administrators, forever, in manner afore- 
said ; in witness whereof the parties have hereunto interchangably 
set their hands and seals, the day and year above written. 

Clark Bliss, [seal) 
Signed and sealed in presence of 

S. T. North am, 

James Moody 1 \o\ 1 . 

July 7, 1806. Voted: that the Wardens, with Mr. Crooke, be a 
committee to endeavor to obtain an organist for the Church as soon 
as possible. 

August 1, 1806, the anniversary of the founding of the Female 
Benevolent Society, a sermon was preached in the Church, and the 
collection taken up in aid of the Society amounted to $132. [The 
Society owed its origin to the benevolence of Mrs. Osborne, a mem- 
ber of the Congregational Society, which had it under especial care ; 
but its influence for good was wide-spread, and the other churches 
contributed from time to time, by collections, such as above, pre- 
ceded by a sermon.] 

October 6, 1806. Mr. Edward Brinley was requested to officiate 
as Junior Warden during the absence of Capt. William Wood, who 
was going on a voyage to sea. 

November 3. The committee having reported that the repairs 
lately made on the church and parsonage-house amounts to sixteen 
hundred dollars, which, together with the sum of four hundred dol- 
lars heretofore borrowed for the repairs of the parsonage, and for 



262 ANNALS OT TRINITY CHURCH, 

which the Church is now paying interest, making in the whole two 
thousand dollars ; and the sum often hundred and fifty having been 
already assessed on the pews, leaves a deficiency of nine hundred 
and fifty dollars, to assess which sum immediately is recommended 
to the congregation. 

Some question having been raised as to the power and authority 
of the Church to make and collect certain assessments, an act ex- 
planatory of the charter of the Church was passed at the June ses- 
sion of the General Assembly, 1806. 

Be it enacted by this General Assembly, and by the authority 
thereof it is enacted, that whenever any tax, or proportion of money, 
shall be assessed by order of said Corporation, upon the pews of 
the Church edifice and its appurtenances, which are already, or may 
hereafter be made, such a tax, or proportion of money, shall be paid 
by the several owners of such pews, agreeably to their respective 
assessments, and the rules and ordinances of said Corporation. 
And in case any owner, as aforesaid, shall, for the space of three 
months, after notice of any tax, or proportion, assessed, as afore- 
said, refuse, or neglect, to pay the same, the pews of such delin- 
quents shall and may be sold by order of said Corporation, at pub- 
lic vendue, for the payment and discharge of such taxes and costs ; 
Provided, nevertheless, that such sale shall be previously advertised 
at least thirty days before such pews shall be offered for sale, and 
the surplus money, if any, after the payment of such taxes and costs, 
shall be lodged with the Wardens of said Trinity Church, to be 
paid over to such delinquents, or their legal representatives, on de- 
mand. 

November 9, 1806. A tax of nine dollars was assessed on the 
pews on the lower floor, and one dollar on the gallery pews, agree- 
ably to a recommendation from the Rector, Wardens and Vestry on 
the 3 d inst., in order to make up the deficiency due for the repairs 
lately made on the Church edifice and appurtenances. 

December I, 1806. It was voted that Mr. Littlefield be requested 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 263 

to employ Mr. Thomas Arnold to take charge of the Church clock, 
put her in order, and agree with him for a compensation to keep it 
so. 

It was also voted that the Wardens be requested to have tin- 
stove put up in the Church, and that they procure, at the expense 
of the Church, whatever pipes were wanted, to be made of iron, and 
that they purchase sea coal sufficient to keep a fire during the 
winter.' 1 ' 

The Rev' 1 Mr. Dehon was requested, if he could conveniently do 
so, to go to New York, in order to solicit Bishop Moore to take 
the churches within this State into his Diocese and charge; agree- 
ably to the unanimous desire of the late State Convention, held in 
Newport. 

January 5, 1807. Francis Malbone and Peleg Wood were ap- 
pointed a committee to assist the Wardens in collecting the arrear- 
ages due to the Church. 

February 2, 1807. It having been stated that the subscriptions 
for repairing the Church not having all been paid in, and the pews 
of delinquents not having been sold, as contemplated, it was voted: 
that Messrs. Crooke and Peleg Wood be a committee to loan at 



248 The heating of the Church was a problem not easily solved ; there 
was no chimney, and the stoves, first but one, then, in the writer's day, 
two, were set up, and while they roasted those whose pews were mai to 
them, the congregation in other parts of the Church were smarting with 
cold. At one time the stoves, two enormous ones, were placed in the middle 
aisle, and the pipes were led across the Church, right and left, and taken 
through the windows. The marks where the paint was blistered, both on 
the inside and outside of the pews nearest to the stoves, can easil) be 
found by one who looks for them. Then the stoves, huge east-iron box 
stoves, were placed at the four corners of the Church, and the pipes were 
gathered into one large vertical copper pipe, that passed up through the 
ceiling near the centre of the Church, and entered a small chimney built 
there for that purpose. All these were expedients, and finally the present 
arrangement, heating by furnaces, was adopted. 



264 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

one of the Banks in Newport, on account and in behalf of the con- 
gregation, as much money as will discharge the balance due from 
the Church to the Rev d Mr. Dehon, to the first day of January, 1807, 
as soon as the amount thereof is ascertained; and that the Wardens 
regularly pay the discount on the same. 

At the annual meeting, Easter Monday, March 30, 1807, the fol- 
lowing officers were elected : 

William Littlefield and William Wood, Wardens. 

Vestry : Francis Brinley, John Bours, Francis Malbone, Benjamin 
Gardiner, Henry Sherburne, William Crooke, William Littlefield, 
Robert N. Auchmuty, Saunders Malbone, Simeon Martin, William 
Wood, Peleg Wood, Edward Brinley, Jacob Smith and Stephen T. 
Northam. 

John Bours, Clerk of the Vestry. 

Joseph Dyer, Clerk of the Church. 

Uriah Gorton, Sexton. 

Messrs. Brinley, Bours, Auchmuty, Gardiner and Martin be con- 
tinued as delegates to the next convention, with the addition of 
William Crooke and Samuel Whitehorne. 

The taxes were to be the same as during the past year ; and the 
Rector, Wardens and Vestry were again urged to " use their 
endeavors to obtain an organist." 

The following report from a committee appointed by the Vestry 
was read to the Congregation, when it was unanimously adopted, 
and the Wardens were instructed to carry the same into effect as 
soon as may be ; and if any legal advice was necessary, they were 
to apply to William Hunter and request his assistance. 

Whereas, on an investigation of the accounts tor the repairs of 
Trinity Church edifice, and its appurtenances, it is found there is 
still a large sum wanting to pay the demands against said Church, 
and the subscribers having been appointed a committee, at a meet- 
ing of the Rector, Wardens and Vestry of said Church, on Monday, 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 



265 



the 16 th inst., to draft a plan to be laid before the Congregation for 
their approbation, on the ensuing Easter Monday, in order to carry 
into effect a law passed by the General Assembly of this State, at 
their Session, in June last, empowering the Corporation to dispose 
of any pews in said Church, which are indebted for the repairs 
thereof, do respectfully report, that it is expedient the Corporation 
should empower the Wardens, with the advice and consent of the 
Vestry, to dispose of such Pews as have become forfeited to the 
Church by the original regulations thereof; and any other pews, in 
conformity to the above-mentioned act of the General Assembly, 
and that the money arising from such sales be appropriated accord- 
ingly. 








It/Ok 



18 



266 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



It having been stated at a Vestry meeting June I, 1807, that " a 
French gentleman, at Philadelphia," had offered to become the 
organist of the Church, "provided he could receive suitable encour- 
agement," it was voted that one hundred and four dollars per annum 
be offered him, with an assurance that the Vestry would do all in 
their power to secure pupils for him. 

Delinquent taxpayers having been duly informed of the course 
the Vestry would pursue if any taxes remained longer unpaid, it 
was voted August 21st that the following pews on the lower floor 
be " advertised for sale in the next Nexvport Mercury, agreeably to 
the original regulations of the Congregation of the Church : Num- 
bers 9, 11, 19, 21, 26, 28, 32, 47, 49, 62, 63, 6y, 76. Half pew of 
No. 80 and No. 92 ; and in conformity to an Act of the General 
Assembly of the State of Rhode Island, passed at the June Session, 
1806: pews Nos. 23, 34, 39, 52, 55, 59,64,65,68, 77, 91, 93, 95 and 
96, for taxes due for repairs; and that the said pews be sold at public 
auction on Wednesday, the 23d day of September next, at 10 o'clock 
in the forenoon, at said Church." 

The sale took place March 30, 1807, and the purchasers were: 



No. 9. Peleg Wood, south half, 

" " Edward Easton, north half, . 

" 11. Robert Robinson, north half, 

" 19. Francis Brinley, . 

" 21. Edmund T. Waring, 

" 39. Samuel F. Gardner, 

" 55. Robert N. Auchmuty, . 

" 59. John Boit, .... 



$100.00 
80.00 
75.00 
55.00 
80.00 
80.00 
65.00 
90.00 



Nos. 4, 23, 26, 28, 32, 34, 47, 49, 62, 63, 64, 6.5, 67, 68, -jt 88, 91, 
92, 93,95 and 96 were purchased by William Crooke, for the Church, 
at prices ranging from $20 to $50. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, 267 

June 18, 1807. William Audinet 249 was buried. 

At a Vestry meeting, November 2, 1807. Upon motion made by 
Mr. Francis Malbone, and unanimously agreed to, that twelve cords 
of wood should be purchased and presented to the Rev d Mr. De- 
hon, and Mr. Northam generously offered to advance the money to 
procure the same. It was also voted that Mr. Northam be re- 
quested to purchase twelve cords of good oak wood, and have the 
same carted, sawed and stowed at the parsonage, and that he be re- 
imbursed by the Wardens as soon as they are in cash on account 
of pews lately disposed of. 

December 7, 1807. The Rector and Wardens were a committee 
to make enquiry of the Rev rt Mr. Ward respecting the state of the 
school, and make report at the next meeting of the Vestry. 

A proposal being made that another stove should be procured 
and set up in the church, similar to the one already there, the same 

24!l " William Audinet was born at Periguex, France, and for many years 
was an inhabitant of the island of Guadaloupe. Compelled to fly on ac- 
count of the civil commotion there, he sought safety and protection in a 
land of liberty, and twelve years since came with his family to this town, 
where he has lived in such a manner as to acquire notice and respect from 
all who became acquainted with him. Abroad he always appeared polite, 
affable and pleasing in his manner. At home the pious and exemplary 
Christian, the kind and affectionate husband, and the most indulgent 
master ; beloved and revered alike by all, they mourn his exit with the 
sincerest emotions of unfailing grief. His remains, attended by many of 
the most respectable citizens, were decently interred on the Tuesday even- 
ing following. The funeral services were performed by the Rev. Mr. Ward, 
of the Episcopal Church." — Newport Mercury. 

Madame Audinet soon after died, which event was thus noticed by the 
same paper : 

On Sunday, October 18, 1807, Madame Mary Catharine Audinet, relict 
of Mr. William Audinet, whom she survived only four months, and near to 
whom her remains were placed. Rev. Mr. Matignon, Rector of the Roman 
Catholic Church in Boston, performed with affecting solemnity the burial 
service agreeably to the rites of that Church. 



268 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

was assented to and a subscription immediately opened to purchase 
a stove and the necessary pipe, and to pay the expense of erecting 
the same. 

At a Vestry meeting, December 8, 1807, tne following vote of 
the Town was ordered to be recorded. 

" In Town Meeting, December 8, 1807. It is voted and resolved 
that the thanks of the Town be presented to the Society of the 
Episcopal Church for the use of their bell heretofore, and to request 
of them that it may be continued to be rung, as usual. It is also 
voted : that the sexton of the Church be the person to ring the said 
bell, and that he have fifty dollars per year. It is also voted that 
Mr. Robert Rogers be appointed to present the thanks of the town 
to the said Society for the use of their bell heretofore. 

" Witness, Jonathan Almy, 

" Town Clerk." 

March 7, 1808. The Rev d Mr. Dehon having delivered to the 
Wardens one hundred dollars, the amount of two legacies bequeathed 
by Mrs. Judith Tillinghast 250 and her sister, Miss Susan Ayrault, in 
their last will and testament, to the poor in Trinity Church in New- 
port, and having informed the Vestry of the opinion of Mrs. Mary 
Scott, the administratrix upon the estates of the donors, that their 
design would be most extensively and permanently accomplished 
by making the said donation a part of the poor fund : Voted, there- 
fore, that the same be added to the said fund for the use of the poor, 
and that Mr. Francis Brinley be requested to purchase with the money 
a share in the Rhode Island Union Bank. 



250 Judith Tillinghast and Susanna Ayrault we're sisters, and daughters 
of Daniel, son of Pierre Ayrault. Judith, born December 9, 1725, and 
died November 26, 1806, married Joseph Tillinghast. Susanna, born 
June 29, 1723, remained single and died a year after her sister. Mary 
Scott, the administratrix, was the daughter of Stephen Ayrault, son of 
Daniel, and the widow of George Scott, who died in 1798, and to whom 
she was married September 16, 1764. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 269 

At the meeting of the Congregation, Easter Monday, April 18, 
1 808: 

William Littlefield and Benjamin Mumford, Jr., were elected 
Wardens. 

Vestry: Francis Brinley, John Bours, Francis Malbone, Benj. 
Gardiner, Henry Sherburne, William Crooke, Wm, Littlefield, Robt. 
N. Auchmuty, Benj. Mumford, Jr., in place of Saunders Malbone, 
resigned, Simeon Martin, John Wood, in place of his brother, Wil- 
liam Wood, deceased, Peleg Wood, Edward Brinley, Jacob Smith 
and Stephen T. Northam. 

Clerk of the Vestry, John Bours; Clerk of the Church, Thomas 
H. Mumford, son of John Mumford ; and Uriah Gorton, Sexton. 

The salary of the Clerk of the Church was raised to $50, but that 
of the sexton was continued at $30. 

The tax remained the same. 

The Wardens were enjoined to use their endeavors to obtain an 
organist. 

Voted : that the thanks of the Congregation be presented to Miss 
Calhoun for her officiating on the organ to this time, and to request 
a continuance to gratify them, while agreeable and convenient to 
herself, and that the Clerk of the Vestry furnish her with a copy of 
this vote. 

The thanks of the Congregation were also presented to Mr. Ed- 
ward Brinley, for kindly officiating as Warden, during the absence 
of Capt. Wm. Wood, and since his death. 

[February 13, 1809. Mrs. Sarah Read, consort of Dr. William 
Read, of Charleston, S. C, suddenly died here. Her remains were 
taken to Trinity Church, where the burial service was read by Rev' 1 
Mr. Dehon, after which they were deposited in the family vault of 
the late Governor Wanton, adjoining the Clifton ground.] 

March 6th. Voted: that the lot purchased lately of Lawrence 
Clarke, and leased to him until the 25th inst, be again leased to him 



270 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

for two years, by the Wardens, and at the same rent, he. giving 
security for the payment of the same, 

Benj. Gardiner was appointed to lease the Bliss lot for a term not 
exceeding three years, and that a refusal be given to James Mitchell, 
who had improved it for the past three years. 

The Wardens were to have the clock repaired. 
May I. Col. Sherburne and Mr. Crooke were a committee to 
wait upon Rev. Mr. Ward, and enquire of him whether Mr. Trevett 
had given him possession of the school-house, and whether it was 
in as good repair as when he entered it. 

June 2, 1809. Benj. B. Mumford was appointed to act as Clerk 
of the Vestry during the absence of Mr. John Bours. 

Francis Brinley, Benj. Gardiner, Simeon Martin, William Crooke 
and Benj. B. Mumford were appointed a committee to digest a plan 
for a raising a permanent fund for the Church, and to report at the 
next meeting. 

A committee appointed to receive the books and papers belong- 
ing to the Church, and in the hands of Mr. Bours, reported August 
7th that they had received from Mr. Bours "A chest containing two 
books of record, two books of account and divers files of papers ; 
also a mortgage deed of Wm. Howard's house and lot of land for 
one hundred and twelve dollars and sixty -three cents ; a certificate 
for one share in the Rhode Island Union Bank, John Bours' note 
endorsed by Stephen T. Northam, payable at said bank in six 
months, for two hundred and fifty -three dollars and fifteen cents, and 
also the balance in his hands belonging to the Church Yard Fund, 
amounting to twenty-four dollars and thirty-two cents." 

The plan for raising a Permanent Fund was received, and its fur- 
ther consideration was deferred to a subsequent meeting. 

August 21, 1809. It was voted that a committee be appointed to 
report another plan for raising a permanent fund, to be laid before 
the congregation, and the Vestry was to meet the following Thurs- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 271 

day at Mr. Auchmuty's to receive the report. Messrs. Sherburne, 
Gardiner and Northam were that committee. 

At a meeting of the Vestry August 24, 1809, the report of the 
committee for raising a permanent fund was received, when it was 
voted to call the congregation together on the following Sunday 
afternoon, to hear it read and take some action upon it. The fol- 
lowing was the report: 

The Committee appointed by the Vestry of Trinity Church, on 
the 21st inst., to report a plan for raising a permanent fund for the 
better support of the Church, do respectfully offer the follow- 
ing, viz. : 

That a subscription be opened under the direction of the congre- 
gation, for raising the sum of six thousand dollars, payable in one 
year by quarterly instalments of 25 per cent, after the aforesaid sum 
of six thousand dollars shall be subscribed. 

That an annual contribution be solicited for raising such further 
sums as in addition to the sum subscribed for (with the interest that 
may arise thereon) will amount to ten thousand dollars, which con- 
tribution might perhaps be made in Church, by having a day, or part 
of a day, annually set apart for that purpose. 

That all money raised by subscription, or donation, be put to in- 
terest, or vested in some subscription of permanent stock, under the 
direction of a committee to be appointed by the congregation for 
that purpose, and that none of the money raised as aforesaid, or the 
interest arising thereon, be appropriated or used for any other pur- 
pose whatever, until the same amount to the aforesaid sum of ten 
thousand dollars ; after which the annual profit of said fund shall be 
at the disposal of the Corporation of Trinity Church, and that the 
subscription shall not be obligatory on any person until the amount 
of six thousand dollars be subscribed. 

Submitted by 

Henry Sherburne, 
Benj. Gardiner, 
S. T. Northam, 

Committee, 



2 72 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

At a meeting of the Congregation at Trinity Church, Sunday, 
August 27, 1809, 

Voted : that the report of the Committee for raising a permanent 
fund be accepted, and that the consideration thereof be for the 
present deferred." 

At a Vestry meeting, October 19, 1809, Voted: that the thanks 
of this Vestry, on behalf of the Congregation, be made Miss Floride 
Calhoun, for her goodness in officiating on the organ, and that a silver 
cup, of the value of thirty dollars, be also presented her, as a token 
of their respect and esteem, with the following inscription engraved 
thereon : 

"Presented on the 7th of November, 1809, by the Rector, 
Wardens and Vestry of Trinity Church, in Newport, Rhode Island, 
to Miss Floride Calhoun, of Charleston, South Carolina, as a testi- 
mony of their sense of the obliging manner and excellent skill with 
which she has performed on the organ of the Church, and a small 
token of their gratitude and respect." 

The Wardens were instructed to procure such a cup, and present 
it to Miss Calhoun. 

At a Vestry meeting, February 5, 18 10, 

Voted : that it is the opinion of this Vestry, that chanting be con- 
tinued in the Church, conformably with the rubric, until Easter 
Monday. 

Voted : that the final discussion of altering the organ loft be de- 
ferred till Easter Monday ; but in the mean time the Chanters may, 
under the immediate directions of the Wardens, at their own ex- 
pense, make such internal alterations in the four pews (two on each 
side of the organ loft) as may suit their own convenience. 

Voted: that the Vestry of Trinity Church thank the gentlemen 
and ladies for their performance in chanting the service on Christmas 
days, and request a continuance thereof; and that a copy of this vote 
be presented by the Clerk of the Vestry. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 273 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

1810-1811. 

[At this time, February, 18 10, the Rector, Rev d Theodore Dehon, 
D.D., received a call to the rectorship of St. Michael's Church, 
Charleston, S. C, and from that city he addressed the following 
letter to the Wardens, Vestry and Congregation of the Church :] 

Charleston, 21 Feb., 1810. 
Gentlemen : 

When I received an invitation to the Rectorship of St. Michael's 
Church in this city, I thought it a duty to visit this place before I 
came to a decision, in order that I might be more fully satisfied of 
the course which I ought to pursue. I have found here a climate 
in which my health has been better than at any other time in the 
last fifteen years of my life, a very numerous Church, among whom 
it would seem I may minister in sacred things without any diminu- 
tion of my usefulness, and a body of clergy of our own denomina- 
tion, such as I have long wished to be associated with. The provision 
proposed to be made for my maintenance is ample ; and the building 
in which I am to officiate not disproportioned to my strength. These 
considerations, combined with others which I need not now mention, 
presented a body of inducements to a removal which my friends here 
thought I ought not to resist. But their force has been strengthened 
in a manner which leaves me unable any longer to doubt which is 
the path, that a regard to my health and my usefulness in the Church 
of the Redeemer should lead me to pursue, by an unanimous con- 
sent of the Vestry, that I may reserve to myself the privilege of 
being absent during the summer months, as long as it shall be neces- 
sary to my safety. 

On this condition, without which I had made up my mind to re- 
turn to the care of my beloved flock in Newport, I have felt it my 



274 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

duty to accept the invitation given me ; and, consequently, to resign 
the Rectorship of your Church. This resignation, Gentlemen, I 
hope will be received by you with an assurance that it is not made 
with any diminution of my regard for your long respected Society, 
and that it is the result of much serious, prayerful and anxious de- 
liberation. It would have comported more with my own feelings, 
not to have made it till after my return to the northward ; but I have 
deemed it due to you, as well as coincident with wishes, expressed, 
when I was about to leave Newport, to make this early communica- 
tion, in order that any opportunity which may occur of providing 
your Church with another Rector, need not pass away unimproved. 
Should you, however, desire it, this arrangement need not go into 
full separation until the autumn of the year. I shall return to New- 
port (God willing) in the Spring, and if it will in any way be pro- 
motive of the welfare, or convenience, of the Church, my services 
shall be cheerfully given during the summer to the flock among 
whom I have so happily lived and labored, and whom I shall leave 
with emotions which can only be known by him who feels them. 
I am, Gentlemen, with the highest sentiments of esteem and 

regard, 

Your Humble and obedient servant, 

Theodore Dehon. 251 . 
The Wardens, Vestry 

and Congregation of Trinity Church. 

251 Right Reverend Bishop Dehon was born in Boston, in 1776, gradu- 
ated at Harvard in 1795, was ca h e d to Trinity Church in 1798, removed 
to Charleston, S. C, in 1810, where he became Rector of St. Michael's, 
and was made Bishop of South Carolina in 181 2. He died in 181 7. 

Two volumes of his sermons were published in 1821. They were much 
read, both in this country and in England. An edition was published in 
London, in 1823, and a new edition in New York, 1859. 

A number of his sermons were also published in pamphlet form. One 
on the death of General Washington, 1800; one on the death of George 
Gibbs, 1803; a discourse delivered in Providence before the Female 
Charitable Society of that city, 1804; and a Thanksgiving Sermon in 
Newport, 1806. 

Bishop Dehon was married to Sarah Russell, daughter of Jonathan Rus- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 275 

At the Annual Meeting, Easter Monday, April 23, 18 10, the fol- 
lowing officers were elected : 

Samuel Whitehouse, . . . Senior Warden. 
Edward Easton Junior Warden. 

Vestry : 
Francis Brinley, Benj. B. Mumford, 

John Bours, Simeon Martin, 

Saunders Malbone, John P. Mann, 

Benj. Gardiner, John Wood, 

Henry Sherburne, Edward Brinley, 

Wm. Crooke, Samuel Whitehorne, 

Wm. Littlefield, Steph. T. Northam, 

Rob. N. Auchmuty, Edward Eaton, 

John L. Boss, Senior. 
Benj. B. Mumford, Clerk of Vestry. 
Uriah Gorton, Sexton. 

Delegates to the State Convention : Messrs. Brinley, Bours, 
Auchmuty, Gardiner, Martin, Crooke and Whitehorne. 
No change was made in the tax. 

Voted : that Benjamin Gardiner and Simeon Martin, Esquires, 
be, and they are hereby appointed and empowered, jointly and sev- 
erally, as delegates from this Church, to meet at Trinity Church in 
Boston " on the Tuesday preceding the last Wednesday in May 
next," then and there to vote for a Bishop to preside over this con- 
gregation, and to transact such other business as may come before 
them touching the interest of the Church, and that their expenses 
be paid by the Church. 



sell, of Charleston, October 26, 1813. Mr. Russell was of Rhode Island 
origin. At one time he was Collector of the Port of Bristol, and at 
another time Minister from the United States to Sweden. 



276 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted: that the organ-loft be altered and enlarged, to accom- 
modate the singers and chanters of sacred music. 

[The convention met in Boston, in June, and unanimously elected 
Rev d Alexander Viets Griswold, 252 Bishop of Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, Vermont and Rhode Island.] 

June 4, 1810, the Wardens, Messrs. Whitehorne, and Col. Sher- 
burne, were appointed to present the name of some suitable person 
to be settled over the Church as minister. 

[The annual meeting of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted 
Masons, in Rhode Island, was held at the State House in Newport, 
on St. John's day, June 25, 18 10. After the installation, the mem- 
bers of the Order marched in procession, with music, to Trinity 
Church, where a discourse was delivered by the newly elected 
Bishop of the Diocese.] 

July 2 d the following action was taken in regard to the resigna- 
tion of Rev d Mr. Dehon : 

Whereas, the Rev d Theodore Dehon did, by his letter of February 
last, to the Wardens, Vestry and congregation of said Church, 
communicate his resignation of the Rectorship thereof, with a tender 
of his service 'till the ensuing autumn, to which letter no answer 
hath been given, it is therefore voted unanimously that Francis 
Brinley, Benjamin Gardiner, and W m Crooke, Esquires, together 
with the Wardens, be a committee to wait on him, to congratulate 



262 Art /*> f) t /9 &7k Rt< K " evl ^ isllo P Griswold, born 

*//t#tC£/We~/, wCyV^K^O L at Simsbury, Ct., April 22, 1766, 
/ was ordained priest, October 1st, 

1799. After his ordination he had charge of several small parishes in his 
native State. In 1804 he was settled at Bristol, R. I., as Rector of St. 
Michael's. He was consecrated in Trinity Church, New York, in May, 
181 1, by the Rt. Rev. Bishop White; but his connection with St. 
Michael's did not terminate till 1835, when he gave his whole attention 
to the Episcopate. 



" NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 277 

him on his safe return to this place, to acknowledge the receipt of 
the above communication, and to thank him for his kind and 
benevolent offer of continuing with us till the ensuing autumn, 
assuring him that it is with pleasure that we accept thereof, expect- 
ing within that time we shall be so fortunate as to settle a Rector 
in our Church. 



[The committee addressed a letter to Bishop Jarvis, of New 
Haven, asking him to recommend a clergyman to take charge of 
the parish. A little later Rev d Salmon Wheaton came to Newport 
bearing a letter from Rev d Bela Hubbard, of New Haven.] 

New Haven, July ri, 1810. 
Dear Sir : 

The bearer is the Rev d S. Wheaton, A.M., of Yale College, of 
handsome talents, and of much literary accomplishment for his age ; 
a close student, and who bids fair to make a useful member of 
society in general, and of the Church of God in particular. For 
some months past he has been assisting me in my church, to uni- 
versal satisfaction. He makes an exchange with Mr. Seabury, of 
New London, and contemplates going to Newport, and would 
spend a Sunday in your Church, and, attached, as I know you are, 
to our most excellent Church, I presume to solicit your attention 
so far to my young friend, as to give him an introductory letter to 
such person or persons of that Church as you shall think proper. 
I am, dear sir, with sentiments of esteem, your old and affectionate 
friend, 



(faAJtv/fc^ 



John Bours, Esq., 

Mr. Wheaton is in Priests' Orders. 



[Mr. Bours was at that time in New London, and on the receipt 
of the above letter he wrote to the Wardens :] 



278 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

New London, July 16, 1810. 
Gentlemen : 

You will be sensible of the propriety of my forwarding to you 
the enclosed letter by the bearer of this, the Rev d Mr. Wheaton, 
from its contents. To add to a recommendation from so respect- 
able and good a character as Docf Hubbard, were I able to do it, 
might, perhaps, be judged superfluous; shall, therefore, only ob- 
serve, that Mr. Wheaton officiated in the Church here, all the day 
yesterday, the Rev d Mr. Seabury being absent on a journey, to uni- 
versal approbation. 

I am extremely anxious to return to my native town once more, 
and to reunite with you in public worship, in that Church, in 
whose courts it has been the most fervent wish of my soul to dwell, 
but the delicate situation of my health is such that I greatly fear it 
is otherwise ordered. 

That the congregation may be united in the choice of a Rector, 
and our Church again prosper and flourish, and thereby the cause 
of our holy religion promoted, is the ardent prayer to heaven of, 

Gent n your old brother, affectionate friend and Obed 1 hum ble 

servant 

J. Bours. 

Messrs. Littlefield and Mumford, 
Wardens of Trinity Church, 
Newport. 



[With the above there was the following letter from Rev. Mr. 
Hubbard to the Wardens of Trinity Church :] 



New Haven, July 12, 1810. 
Gentlemen : 

In consequence of your letter to me, under date of the 2 1st ult, 
the Reverend Salmon Wheaton makes you a visit, conformably to 
the wishes you expressed. The testimonials it will be proper for 
him to submit to your inspection, will inform you of his orders. 
This letter may serve to certify, as far as I know, that his life and 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 279 

behavior have been agreeable to the tenor and requirements specified 
in the general canons of our Church. For the relief of the Rector 
of Trinity Church in New Haven [Rev. Bela Hubbard] the vestry- 
engaged him to officiate in said Church, which he has done for 
some months past I believe to the approbation of the congregation. 
I have no cause to doubt the correctness of his principles, and 
therefore think him deserving of confidence, in regard to soundness 
in faith, as it may relate to doctrines, government and discipline of 
the Church. 

Commending you and your Church to the protection and bless- 
ing of Almighty God, 

I am, Gentlemen, 

Your obedient humble 
Servant in Christ, 

Bela Hubbard. 253 



[Rev d John Ward, who had been school- master and assistant 
minister, and for a short time filled the pulpit after the resignation 
of Rev d Mr. Dehon, having closed his connection with the Church 
at this time, and left the town, the following letter was addressed to 
him by Mr. Samuel Whitehorne, the Senior Warden.] 



Newport, July 26, 1810. 
Rev d John Ward. 

Dear Sir : 

I am directed by the Vestry of Trinity Church to 
pay you for your kind services in officiating in said Church, from the 



252 Rev d Bela Hubbard died in 1812. " The faithful missionary, the 
pious priest, the watchful pastor, after a life spent in the service of his 
Master, was called to his reward on the 6th day of December, 181 2. His 
name is yet green among the children of those who knew and loved him, 
and enjoyed his ministrations, and is never mentioned by them but with 
affection and veneration. — His. of Trinity Church, New Haven. 



23o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

resignation of Mr. Dehon until your departure, at the same rate of 
salary paid him, say seven hundred dollars per annum. After deduct- 
ing for one month and five days paid you as an Assistant Minister 
during the time which, as per statement enclosed, you will find a 
balance in your favor of two hundred and twenty-three -^^ dollars, 
which my brother will hand you, by whom I send this. 

The reversed account inclosed, annexing a receipt for the balance, 
you will please sign and hand him. 

I have taken this mode of remitting you the money, not knowing 
when I should have the pleasure of seeing you in Newport. 

I am, Rev d Sir, 

Your respectful friend, 
Sam. Whitehorne, Senior Warden. 

[The following letters at this time passed between Rev. Salmon 
Wheaton and a committee of the Vestry :] 

New Haven, Aug. 21, 1810. 
Gentlemen : 

The importance of the subject and my not returning to New Haven 
quite as soon as was expected, must be my apology for delaying to 
write to you. 

When I consider the pleasant local situation of Newport, the kind- 
ness and hospitality of its inhabitants, the state of your Church, and, 
above all, the perfect unanimity with which I was elected your Rec- 
tor, I am strongly inclined, I am very desirous, to accept your invi- 
tation. My friends also, and the friends of our Church, are solicitous 
that I should. 

But on the other hand, there is some difficulty in my own mind, 
and in the minds of my friends, with regard to the salary. I am 
sensible it would be abundantly sufficient for my support were I to 
remain a single man. How long that will be I can't say. Like other 
young men, I am liable to have a family. From a statement of your 
late worthy Rector, Dr. Dehon, and from the result of many other 
inquiries, I am inclined to believe that the salary proposed will 
hardly be sufficient for the support of a clergyman at housekeeping. 
If I know my own heart, money is not the object for which I entered 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 2S1 

into the sacred ministry. I wish nothing unreasonable, but I do 
wish to be in comfortable circumstances, and I am confident your 
Church have it in their power to place me in such. May we not 
then adopt some expedient which will accommodate both the con- 
gregation and myself? 

I think I should be well satisfied to accept what you have pro- 
posed, so long as I might remain unmarried, provided you will 
agree to raise the salary in case I should marry. How much it 
ought then to be raised you who have families are better judges 
than myself. Relying, therefore, wholly on your candor and good- 
ness, I respectfully submit it to you to say whether or not such a 
conditional addition to the salary shall be made and, if so, what 
that addition shall be. 

That God may bless our excellent Church, and especially that 
part to which you belong, is the sincere prayer of 
Gentlemen, 

Your most obedient and humble SeiV 





0V» 

Messrs. Gentlemen of the Committee. 

Newport, Aug st 24, 1S10. 
Reverend Sir: 

In consequence of your letter of the 21 st inst., received last 
evening, a vestry has been called this day, who consider us a com- 
mittee appointed by the congregation to invite you to become the 
Rector of our Church, and to make a specific offer of emoluments 
to you, in case you accept the office, which they have no power to 
alter. 

The letter from the Bishop of Connecticut to a former committee, 
and that from Dr. Hubbard to Mr. Bours, both forwarded by 
you, together with your performance, have hitherto commanded 
unanimity in our Church ; should a congregation be assembled 
and a majority consent to the terms proposed by you, we know of 
no compulsory means to bind the minority, and it might tend to 
discord in the Church. It is our wish, and we believe it to be the 

19 



282 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

general wish, that our Rector should have a decent and competent 
support, and if, on trial, our present offer should be found insuffi- 
cient for that end, we trust the congregation, on a fair representa- 
tion, would not fail to make it such. 

The time is now short that we can expect the voluntary benevo- 
lence of Doctor Dehon, to keep our Church open ; we therefore wish 
that, as soon as your decision is made, it may be communicated to 
Your Obedient Humble Servants, 

Francis Brinley, 
Edward Easton, 
Sam. Whitehorne, 

Committee. 
Rev d Salmon Wheaton, 
New Haven. 

New Haven, September 4, 1810. 
Gentlemen : 

I have again to apologize for delaying to write you. To leave 
my friends and near connections, and take the oversight of the 
Church of God in a land where, but a few weeks since, they were 
all strangers, you must be sensible is no small undertaking. I have 
taken time to deliberate on the subject and weigh the contents of 
your letter. My opinion is still the same, that the salary is quite too 
small ; but I confess there appears to be much propriety in your 
remarks, as respects calling another meeting of the congregation. 
I have been in Newport but two Sundays ; of course it cannot be 
expected that I have the confidence of the people to any very great 
extent ; and to press at this time an addition to the salary might, 
as you very justly observe, tend to discord in the Church, especi- 
ally as you have no law, as in Connecticut, to bind the minority. 
On the whole I have thought it advisable to come to Newport upon 
the terms that you have proposed ; and if after being there a suffi- 
cient time to become acquainted with the people, I see no reason to 
alter my mind, shall expect to be instituted your Rector according 
to the office prescribed by the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States. 

My time to remain here according to contract will expire on the 
23d of next month, when I shall be at liberty to be with you. To 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 283 

be sure, I have a right to leave N. Haven at any time ; but it will 
be more convenient for me, and for the people of this Church, to 
have me stay my time out ; and if it is not very material with you, 
I should by all means wish it. My engagement was with the Ves- 
try, and a conditional one, as I told you ; but I find it to be the 
general expectation among the congregation, that I am to remain 
until the time I have mentioned. It will give them an opportunity 
to do something about procuring another assistant for Dr. Hubbard. 
I shall also be able in the mean season to visit my friends and 
make arrangements for my removal. 

With sentiments of respect and esteem I am, 

Gentlemen, your most obedient, humble servant, 

Salmon Wheaton. 254 

Messrs. Brinley & Co., Committee of the Episcopal 
Church, Newport, Rhode Island. 

254 In 1808, at the request of Rev. Bela Hubbard, Rev. Mr. Wheaton 
was engaged as Assistant Minister of Trinity Church, New Haven, where 
he remained in the active performance of his duties till called to Newport, 
in October, 1810, as Rector of Trinity Church, which office he held till 
1840, when he resigned his charge, removed to Johnstone, New York, he- 
came the Rector of St. Michael's Church in that town, and there remained 
up to the time of his death, in 1844. September 24, 181 2, Rev. Dr. 
Wheaton was married to Miss Ann Dehon, sister of Rt. Rev. Bishop 
Dehon, by Rev. Dr. Gardiner, in Trinity Church, Boston. 

On the right of the chancel in the Church, there is a monument cor- 
responding in details to that on the left, to the Rev. Marmaduke Browne, 
bearing this inscription : 

To the Memory of 

Sai mon Wheaton, D.D. 

An Eminent Christian. 

For thirty years the Faithful Rector of this Church, 

Who died December 24th, 1844, aged 62 years. 

Also to Ann Dehon, his Wife, 

Who died December 8th, 1855, aged 73 years. 

Their mortal Remains rest in a tomb under 

St. Paul's Church, Boston, Mass. 

Behold the spirits of the Just, 

Whose faith is e hanged to sight. 



284 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

The committee replied : 

Newport, September n, 1810. 
Rev. Sir : Your esteemed favor, under date 4th inst, was duly 
received, and was laid before the Vestry, who were much pleased 
with your determination to come among us. 

We shall be happy to see you as early as you can make it con- 
venient, but consider that you cannot, consistent with propriety and 
sense of duty, leave the Church at New Haven, before the expira- 
tion of the time you agreed on, unless a successor to you should in 
the mean time be appointed. 

With sentiments of esteem and respect, we are, 
Rev d Sir, Your Obed. and h'ble servt's, 

Edward Easton, 
Sam u Whitehorne, 

Committee. 
For themselves and Francis Brinley, absent. 

July 30, 1 8 10. The Wardens were instructed to borrow two 
hundred dollars to pay the balance due Rev. Mr. Dehon and Rev. 
Mr. John Ward. Captain Littlefield was to engage Miss Towle as 
organist, and to employ Mr. Berkenhead to give her two lessons a 
week, for one quarter, at the expense of the Church. 

October 1, 18 10. Voted: that Benj. Gardiner's account for his 
expenses in attending the convention of the Eastern Diocese, at 
Boston, Sept. 24th, as a delegate, being $15.91, be paid by the 
Wardens. 

Voted : that the thanks of the Vestry be given Benj. Gardiner, 

The use of the pew under the monument was given to Miss Ann 
Wheaton, youngest daughter of Rev. Dr. Wheaton, during her life, and is 
still known as "the Wheaton pew." 

The eldest daughter, Sarah Gibbs Wheaton, became the wife of Dr. 
David King, a physician prominent in his profession, distinguished for his 
many sterling qualities of heart and mind, and a devoted friend of the 
Church. He died March 7th, 1882, and in August of the same year his 
widow also expired. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 285 

Esq., for his faithful service rendered to the Church in his attend- 
ance upon the convention of the Eastern Diocese, at their two last 
meetings, and that the Clerk of the Vestry present him with a copy 
of the above. 

October 25, 1810. The Wardens were requested "to have the 
Congregation convened on Friday morning, at 10 o'clock, for the 
purpose of receiving a communication from the Rev. Doctor 
Dehon." 

At that meeting the following letter was read : 

Newport, 22d Oct., 1810. 

Gentlemen: 

Being informed that your Rector-elect will be here on the first 
Sunday of November, and a convenient opportunity offering for me 
to embark for Charleston next week, I have presumed that next 
Sunday will be the last of my regularly officiating with you. I 
ought to observe to you, Gentlemen, that since the date of my res- 
ignation of the Rectorship of the Church, I have not felt myself 
entitled to the use of the parsonage-house by any formal arrange- 
ment. But not having been on the spot at the time, to have re- 
moved my family, and there not having appeared any necessity to 
remove them since, we have continued in it. For the rent thereof 
I will account with the Wardens, or in any other way that you shall 
direct. You will also indulge me with observing that although no 
objection was made to the resignation, yet the customary acknowl- 
edgement of the acceptance of it by the corporation, to whom it 
was addressed, has not been transmitted to me in their behalf. This 
acknowledgement I could wish to receive before I take my leave of 
the congregation. 

In making this communication to you, gentlemen, I cannot help 
looking back upon the series of years in which we have jointly, and 
with the utmost harmony, superintended the concerns of the Church 
in this place. It is pleasant to me to find nothing in the retrospect 
which indicates a want of union and fidelity; and while my most 
earnest prayers are offered to Heaven, that with equal peace, and 



286 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

greater prosperity, you may continue to manage the same impor- 
tant interests, I pray you to be assured, that to me, the most pain- 
ful thing in the review of my connection with the Vestry, arises 
from the consideration that it is now to be terminated. 

I remain, gentlemen, with esteem and best wishes for your wel- 
fare, your obliged and obedient servant, 

Theodore Dehon. 
The Wardens and Vestry 
of Trinity Church. 

At a meeting of the Wardens, Vestry and congregation of Trinity 
Church, held at the Church on Friday, the 26 th day of October, 
1810, 

Resolved unanimously, that this Corporation accept the resigna- 
tion of the Rev d Doctor Theodore Dehon as Rector of this Church, 
as communicated to this Corporation by his letter of February last, 
and do the same impressed with sentiments of esteem, respect and 
affection for him personally ; with gratitude for the favors conferred 
on us for several months past, and with feelings of real regret at 
taking leave of a clergyman, whose services during his connection 
with us, have been highly valuable and acceptable, whose conduct 
and deportment have been uniformly correct, dignified and scrupu- 
lously moral, and, as we sincerely trust and believe, influenced by 
the precepts and example of his and our Lord and Saviour Jesus 
Christ. 

Newport, October 26, 1810. 
The Rev d Doct r Theodore Dehon, 
Dear Sir: 

In reply to your letter of the 22" inst., we beg leave to observe 
that your's from Charleston, addressed to the Corporation of Trinity 
Church, is not now before us ; we understand it to be in the posses- 
sion of Capt. Littlefield, who is absent from town ; we must, there- 
fore, apologize to you for referring to it from recollection only. We 
believe it to have been dated after the middle of February. The 
first meeting of the Vestry after that time was on the 13 th of March. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 287 

We think you mentioned your intention to be in Newport early in the 
spring ; it was therefore supposed that any answer to it would not 
arrive in Charleston until after you had left it, and we did not con- 
ceive that our acceptance of your resignation at that time was of 
material consequence to you ; we are much concerned that the 
omission should have occasioned you any embarrassment. We 
deem the use of the parsonage-house since your resignation a very 
inadequate compensation for the valuable services you have during 
that period rendered the Church. We enclose a resolution of the 
corporation duly accepting your resignation, and have adopted this 
form, presuming it to be correct and satisfactory to you. In this 
resolution, sir, as members of the congregation we have already ex- 
pressed our feelings — gratitude for your services, and sorrow for 
your departure ; permit us to say, that as members of the Vestry 
for so many years associated with you in the superintendence of 
the concerns of the Church in this place, that we sincerely recipro- 
cate your assurance, " that the most painful thing in the review of 
our connections arises from the consideration that it is now to be 
terminated." 

With sentiments of the highest esteem and respect, and with best 
wishes for your welfare, sir, for and in behalf of the Vestry and 
Wardens of Trinity Church, I remain 

Your Obed 4 Humble Serv* 

B. B. Mumford, Clk of the Vestry. 

At a special Vestry meeting Oct. 29, 18 10, 

Voted: that the Wardens, with Benj. Gardiner, Esquire, be a 
committee to wait on the Rev d Doctor Dehon, and present him the 
thanks of the Vestry for his excellent sermon delivered yesterday, 
and request a copy of the same for the press. 255 

November 5, 1810. Voted unanimously, That the polite and kind 
offer of Messrs. Levi Tower and Samuel O. Auchmuty to officiate, 



255 This was the last sermon that Bishop Dehon preached in Trinity 
Church. 



288 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

the first as Clerk of the Church, and the second as organist, be 
accepted and acknowledged ; and that they be requested to officiate 
under the direction of the Rector, in said stations, so long as it may 
be convenient and agreeable to them; or until a permanent Clerk 
and Organist can be obtained ; and that the Clerk of the Vestry 
furnish each of them with a copy of this vote. 

Voted: That Messrs. S. Whitehorne and Win. Littlefield be a 
committee to wait on Miss Towle, 256 and acquaint her, that in con- 
sequence of the death of Mr. Berkenhead, the offer of two young 
gentlemen to officiate, oneas clerk and the other as organist [had 
been accepted] and as the Church cannot depend upon her services 
for any length of time in the Church, the Vestry feels grateful for 
her past favors and tender her with a ten dollar bill. 

Voted: That Capt. S. T. Northam be a committee to inquire into 
the state of the School-house, now in the occupation of Mr. John 
Rodman, 257 and report to the next Vestry. 

December 5, 18 10. Voted : That the Rector be requested to call 
the Congregation together on Sunday afternoon next, for the pur- 
pose of laying before them the report of the committee to whom 
was referred the plan for raising a permanent fund for the support 
and maintenance of the Church and Minister, for their approbation 
and aid. 

Voted : That the Clerk of the Vestry have the leases given to 

256 Miss Towle was the daughter of the Moravian Minister in Newport. 
Lacking the necessary qualifications as an organist, but desirous of perfect- 
ing herself, she became a pupil of Berkenhead, the former organist of the 
Church, the Vestry paying for- such instruction ; but Berkenhead died at 
this time, and as it was uncertain how long Miss Towle would remain in 
Newport, apart from any question of her ability to fill the post, the above 
arrangement was made. 

257 John Rodman was a Quaker, who devoted his whole attention to 
teaching, in which he gained the confidence of the public. He was born 
in 1 785, and died in 1827. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 289 

Richard Harrison, Esq., and to Mr. John Yeomans, recorded upon 
the Town records, agreeable to law, and that he pay for the same 
and charge it to the Church. 

At a meeting of the Congregation of Trinity Church, held at the 
Church on the 9th of December, 18 10: 

Voted, unanimously : that the report of the committee to whom 
it was referred, to report the ways and means to raise a permanent 
fund, for the better support of the Minister of this Church, dated 
August 23, 1809, be adopted. 

Voted, unanimously : that Benjamin Gardiner, Samuel White- 
horne, Steph. T. Northam, Thomas Handy, and Simeon Martin, 
Esqrs., be a committee to carry the object of that report into full 
effect. 

At a Vestry meeting, Jan'y 7, 181 1. Voted : that the report of 
Mr. Stephen T. Northam, relating to the School-house be accepted, 
and that the amount of his account for repairs on the same, $15.99, 
be paid by the Wardens. 

Voted: That Mr. John Rodman continue in the Church school- 
house, for the term of one year, from the 1st of January, 181 1, on 
the same conditions that he has heretofore had said house, and that 
Mr. Stephen T. Northam be requested to desire Mr. Rodman to in- 
struct the scholars that are under his care by Mr. Kay's donation, 
to teach them the catechism agreeably to the Episcopal mode, at 
least once a week, and that the children that are admitted in said 
school must produce to Mr. Rodman a certificate from the Rector, 
the Wardens, or one of the Vestry of Trinity Church. 

Voted : That the Wardens be directed to pay the instalments as 
they become due, for the three shares subscribed by F. Brinley, 
Esq., for the Corporation of Trinity Church, at the Union Bank in 
this Town, agreeably to the regulations, as directed by said bank, 
which^nstallments are to be paid from the monies arising from Mr. 
Kay's donation. 



2 9 o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : That the Rev. Mr. Wheaton be requested to deliver a 
sermon, as soon as possible, on the subject of the proposed plan for 
promoting the subscription for raising a permanent fund for the 
better support of the Church. 

February 7, 1811. Voted: That the Wardens be a committee 
to wait upon Mr. Neupeau and acquaint him that the congrega- 
tion will employ him as organist on the commencement of Easter, 
provided he qualifies himself to officiate as such by that time, al- 
lowing him the same annual compensation as was paid to Mr. 
Berkenhead. 

[Mr. Samuel Whitehorne had heard of Mr. N'Pau in Philadel- 
phia, as a person who might fill the position of organist, and who, 
on learning that the Vestry were disposed to give him a trial, 
wrote to the Senior Warden, as follows. For some reason, proba- 
bly a want of proper qualifications, he was never appointed as or- 
ganist. The letter is without date :] 

Sir : I thank you for your kind advice of becoming an organist 
in the Trinity Church at next Easter. I resolved therefore to ac- 
cept the kind offer of the Vestry of the Trinity Church, if those 
gentlemen find me qualified for it. 

I therefore request you, sir, to inform those gentlemen that I wish 
very much that they would be very strict in their vote. And should 
any person of this town be better qualified to it than I, that I should 
rather prefer to give to real merit the preference, than to take my 
own advantage. 

I am with respect your Obt. Servt, 

Fred. N'Pau. 

April i, 18 1 1. Voted: That the custom of carrying around the 
box every Sunday, immediately after the sermon, be discontinued, 
and in lieu thereof it be carried round on the last Sunday in every 
quarter. 



NEWPORT, RHODE TSLAND. 291 



CHAPTER XIX. 

1S11-1817. 

Easter Monday, April 15, 181 1. 

Samuel Whitehorne elected Senior Warden, and Edward Easton, 
Junior Warden. 

Vestrymen: Francis Brinley, Saunders Malbone, Benj. Gardiner, 
Henry Sherburne, Wm. Crooke, William Littlefield, Robt. N. Auch- 
muty, Benj. B. Mumford, Simeon Martin, John P. Mann, John 
Wood, Edward Brinley, Samuel Whitehorne, Stephen T. Northam, 
Edward Easton. 

Benj. B. Mumford, Clerk of the Vestry, Uriah Gorton, Sexton. 

Voted : that the salary of the clerk be fifty dollars per annum, 
and that of the sexton be thirty-nine dollars. 

Voted : that Messrs. Brinley, Auchmuty, Gardiner, Crooke, Mar- 
tin and Whitehorne be delegates to the State Convention. The tax 
was to continue the same. 

The Vestry were authorized and empowered to select and ap- 
point a clerk for the ensuing year. 

Voted : that Messrs. Mumford, Thos. Handy and John G. 
Whitehorne be a committee to inquire whether ten scholars can be 
obtained, and if attainable, the committee to write to Mrs. Clarke, 
at New York, and propose to her to be the organist of the Church, 
stating to her the amount of salary (being one hundred and ten 
dollars) the Church is willing to give. 

Voted : that the grateful thanks of this congregation be made to 
Levi Tower and Samuel O. Auchmuty, Esquires, for their services 
under the Church, the past year, and that they be requested to con- 



292 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

tinue the same until the committee hear from Mrs. Clarke, at New 
York. 

At this meeting the following note from Mr. John Bours, 258 a 
member of the Vestry, was read : 

" Mr. Bours presents his best and most affectionate regards to 
the Rev. Mr. Wheaton, Rector, and to the Wardens and Vestry of 
Trinity Church, and requests that he may not be re-elected at the 
choice of Church officers, on Easter Monday next, as the in- 
firmities incident to his period of life, added to very ill health, ren- 
der him utterly unable longer to discharge his duty as a member 
of the Vestry. 

Newport, April 13, 181 1." 

June 11, 181 1. Voted: that Thomas H. Mumford be and he is 
hereby appointed clerk of the Church for the remaining part of the 
year, at the rate of $50 per annum. 

July 2, 181 1. Voted: that Mr. Manchester be instructed one 
quarter, by Miss Towle, at the expense of the Church, and that the 
Wardens pay the same. 

258 There had been no more prominent and efficient layman in the 
Church, for a period of forty-six years, than Mr. Bours ; and there is 
abundant evidence in the records that he was an exemplary Christian. 
It has been said that he was the leader of those who were opposed to 
Rev. James Sayre. The writer at one time entertained the same views, 
but he is now constrained to say there is no warrant for it. From what 
has since been brought to light in regard to the character of Rev. Mr. 
Sayre, it is evident that his mind was then diseased, and it is known that 
he was insane at the time of his death. 

At the time of these troubles in the Church, Mr. Bours was clerk of the 
Vestry, and it is to his credit that there does not appear on the records 
any evidence of any misunderstanding between the pastor and the people. 

That Mr. Bours led a godly life we may reasonably believe, for had it 
been otherwise the congregation would not have urged him to take 
orders and become their settled minister. He died July 26, 1815, in his 
8 1 st year. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 293 

August 5, 181 1. Voted: that the Wardens wait upon Samuel 
O. Auchmuty, Esq., and make him the grateful thanks of this 
Vestry for his past favors, and request him as a particular favor 
conferred upon them, to officiate upon the organ until a permanent 
organist can be obtained, and that he be requested to accept the 
salary assigned to the organist. 

August 19, 181 1. Voted: that the resignation of Thomas H. 
Mumford be accepted as clerk of the Vestry. 

Voted : that Captain Easton be authorized to wait upon Levi 
Tower, and request him to set the psalms until an organist can be 
procured. 

September 2, 181 1. Voted: that Mr. Tower be requested to set 
the psalms in his pew, and that he be allowed and paid at the rate 
of $55 per annum for the time he may serve. 

October 13, 181 1. Married, at Trinity Church, by Rev. Dr. 
Dehon, Thomas William Moore. [His Britannic Majesty's Vice 
Consul at Philadelphia, to Mary, daughter of George Gibbs. She 
died October 14, 18 13.] 

November 11, 181 1. Whereas, Mr. Mallet, an organist from 
Boston, has been recommended to the Vestry as a gentleman well 
qualified to officiate in the Church, and whereas, the Easter meet- 
ing restricted the salary of the organist to $1 10, voted : that Colonel 
Sherburne, be, and he is hereby authorized, to write to Mr. Mallet 
and acquaint him that the salary cannot be exceeded by the Vestry, 
but a number of gentlemen will make up that salary to $133, equal 
to £30 sterling. 

Voted: that notice be given in the next Newport Mercury, by the 
Senior Warden, to the proprietors or owners of pews in the Church, 
unless they. pay up the taxes and assessments now due, they [the 
pews] will be sold by public auction, agreeably to the law in such 
cases made and provided. 

At a meeting of the congregation, held at the Church, December 



2 9 4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

1 6, 1 8 1 1 . Voted: that the report of the committee appointed for 
the purpose of obtaining subscribers for the fund of the Church be 
received, and that the subscription paper, with the report, be re- 
corded verbatim in the Church record book. 

Voted : that the congregation present to the Bishop of the Dio- 
cese $100, and that a collection be made in Church on Sunday 
next for that purpose; and if the above sum is not collected, that 
the balance be raised by subscription. 

Report. 

We, the undersigned, being appointed a committee by the con- 
gregation of Trinity Church, on the 9th of December, 18 10, for the 
purpose of raising by subscription the sum of $6000, to be appro- 
priated for a permanent fund, beg leave to report : that we have by 
our united endeavors accomplished the desirable end proposed, and 
are happy to state that the sum of six thousand and fifty dollars is 
now subscribed for the aforesaid, and that the subscription was 
completed on the 5th day of December, instant. All of which is 
respectfully submitted by 

Simeon Martin, 
Benj. Gardiner, 
Thomas Handy, 
Stephen T. North am, 
Sam l Whitehorne, 

Committee. 

Newport, 16th December, 1S11. 

Whereas, it appears by the report of Benjamin Gardiner, Simeon 
Martin, Thomas Handy and Stephen T. Northam, a committee ap- 
pointed by the congregation, December 9th, 1810, to solicit sub- 
scriptions for raising a permanent fund for the better support of the 
Church, that they have accomplished that desirable object, by ob- 
taining subscriptions to the amount of $6050, being the amount 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 295 

stipulated by the conditions of said subscriptions, in order to make 
it obligatory on the subscribers, in order to carry this laudable 
means into full effect. Voted : that the Vestry of the Church be, 
and they are hereby authorized and empowered to take such meas- 
ures as they may think best for the collection of said monies, and 
for vesting the same whenever collected in such way and manner 
as they in their best judgment may think most promotive of the 
interest of the Church, agreeably to the conditions of the subscrip- 
tion ; said subscription being completed on the fifth day of Decem- 
ber instant. 

It is further voted : that the first instalment, of twenty-five per 
cent, be paid on the 5th of March next, the second on the 5th of 
June next, the third on the 5th of September next, and the fourth 
and last, on the 5th of December next, and that the Vestry report 
their proceedings to this congregation on the first Tuesday in 
January, 181 3. 

The committee appointed by the Vestry of Trinity Church in the 
Town of Newport, in the State of Rhode Island, on the 21st of 
August, 1809, to report a plan for raising a permanent fund for 
the better support of Trinity Church, did respectfully offer the fol- 
lowing, viz : 

That a subscription be opened under the direction of the congre- 
gation for raising the sum of six thousand dollars, payable in one 
year, by quarterly instalments of 25 per cent., after the aforesaid 
sum is subscribed ; and that the first payment be made in three 
months after the said sum of six thousand dollars shall be sub- 
scribed. 

That an annual contribution be solicited for raising such further 
sums as, in addition to the sum subscribed for (with the interest 
that may accrue thereon) will amount to Ten Thousand Dollars, 
which contribution might perhaps be made in Church, by having a 



296 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

day, or part of a day, annually set apart for that purpose. That all 
money raised by subscription, contribution or donation, be put to 
interest, or vested in some description of permanent stock, under 
the direction of a committee to be appointed by the congregation 
for that purpose ; and that none of the money raised as aforesaid, 
or the interest arising thereon, be appropriated or used for any pur- 
pose whatever, until the same amount to the aforesaid sum of Ten 
Thousand Dollars ; after which the annual profit of said fund shall 
be at the disposal of the Corporation of Trinity Church, and that 
the subscription shall not be obligatory on any person until the 
amount of six thousand dollars shall be raised. 

Now we, whose names are underwritten, being appointed the said 
committee, respectfully solicit the aid of all who have at heart the 
prosperity of the Redeemer's Kingdom, and are desirous of pro- 
moting the immortal interest of man. We ask the assistance of all 
for the support of that religion which deeply affects the happiness 
[of] individuals, and on which the welfare of civil society greatly 
depends, that religion whose divine Author was ushered into the 
world by the acclamation of the heavenly hosts, proclaiming " Peace 
on earth and good will towards men." 

Our brethren of the congregation of Trinity Church, and others 
who are disposed to support the gospel, are confidently invited to 
co-operate with us for the establishment of the proposed fund. Its 
sole object is the support of our excellent Church, a Church built 
upon the foundation of the Apostles and Prophets, Jesus Christ Him- 
self being the chief corner-stone. According to our ancient Liturgy 
many of our fathers have here worshipped. They have left an in- 
heritance which we cannot be so insensible as not highly to appre- 
ciate. Shall we not, then, exert ourselves to transmit to our chil- 
dren the blessings which we have the happiness to enjoy? Shall 
we not cheerfully contribute, according to the ability which God has 
given us, towards the accomplishment of what would doubtless very 
much tend to promote the prosperity of our Zion ? We trust there 
are none who do not feel the propriety and justice of providing 
liberally for such as may labor among us, /;/ the Lord, even so hath 
the Lord ordained, that they zvlio preach the gospel should live of the 



XX J I Vl Vv' T. RHODE ISLAND. 



297 



gospel. Let us, then, enter with earnestness upon so important an 
undertaking. Let us accomplish an object whose beneficial effects 
will happily be felt by many in our own time and to prosperity. 

Simeon Martin, 
Benj. Gardiner, 
Stephen T. Northam, 
Thomas Handy, 
Samuel Whitehorne, 
Committee. 

For the purpose of raising a permanent fund for the better sup- 
port of Trinity Church, in the town of Newport, we, the subscribers, 
agree and voluntarily bind ourselves and our heirs to pay the sum 
annexed to our respective names, by quarterly instalments of twenty- 
five per cent. The first payment to be made within three months 
after the subscription shall be completed. This subscription not 
to be binding, unless the sum of six thousand dollars shall be sub- 
scribed within two years from this date. Newport, 21st January, 
a.d., 181 1. Witness our hands. 



Simeon Martin, ......... 

Benj. Gardiner, eight shares of the Newport Insurance Com- 



S300 



Stephen T. Northam, . 










300 


Edward Easton, .... 










200 


Samuel Whitehorne, . 










200 


Francis Brinley, .... 










200 


Robert N. Auchmuty, . 










IOO 


Samuel A. Auchmuty, 










IOO 


John G. Whitehorne, . 










300 


Robert Robinson, 










200 


S. T. Northam, for Thomas Dennis, 










200 


Benj. B. Mumford, 










IOO 


Jn° R. Sherman, . 










200 


Francis Robinson, 










IOO 


John Wood, .... 










IOO 


Mary Gibbs, .... 










30O 


John Banister, .... 


. 








IOO 



20 



298 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



Christopher G. Champlin, 259 . 










$100 


Margaret Champlin, .... 










200 


Robinson Potter, .... 










IOO 


Edward Martin, ..... 










IOO 


John H. Wheelwright, 










IOO 


Henry Sherburne, .... 










50 


William Littlefield, .... 










IOO 


John P. Mann, 










IOO 


Mary Scott, 










IOO 


Edward Brinley, .... 










50 


Edmund Thos. Waring, 










50 


John Bours, .... 










IOO 


Joseph Wood, .... 










50 


George W. Martin, 










50 


Benj. Gardiner, for Wm. Britton, 










IOO 


William Shaw, ..... 










20 


Polly Miller, a pew in the Church, 










20 


Benj. W. Wood, .... 










20 


Jeremiah Lawton, 










20 


C^tiTTX) .<-£ £<£as>n~^£c 


l 


attended 
the Con- 
gregational 


<=_ ^< <^s /? 






v^T/y Jr " 


""■— -^ C h u r c h. 


s^-~r 








He was the 



son of Christopher Champlin, was born in Newport, April 12, 1768, 
graduated at Harvard, travelled in Europe after completing his studies, 
and April 14, 1793, married Martha Redwood Ellery, daughter of Ben- 
jamin Ellery, and granddaughter of Abraham Redwood. In 1796 he was 
elected a Representative to Congress from Rhode Island, but resigned 
before he had completed his second term. In 1809 he was elected U. S. 
Senator, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Francis Mai bone, but 
an affliction that befel him in 181 1 (the death of his son) led him to 
retire from public life. In 1800 he joined the Artillery Company, served 
in the ranks, then as Lieutenant, and finally as Colonel. March 28, 
1840, full of years and respected by all who knew him, he passed from 
earth, dying in his own house in Newport. Mrs. Champlin, who was 
born March 13, 1772, died February 22, 1847. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 



299 



John C. Phillips, . 

Daniel W. Barker, 

Henry Shaw, 

George Wanton, . 

Chas. Baring, Jr , . 

Samuel F. Gardner, 

Jonathan Almy, . 

William Crooke, . 

Silas Dean, . 

John L. Boss, 

William Hunter, . 

Benj. Hazard, 

S. Malbone, 

Wm. C. Gardner, . 

Mrs. Jane Stewart, 

Miss Nancy Stewart, . 

Francis Brinley, 2d subscription, . 

Simeon Martin, do do 

Stephen T. Northam, 2d subscription, 

Edward Easton, 

William Littlefield, 

Henry Sherburne, 

Samuel Whitehorne, " 

Cash, ...... 

William Crooke, 2d subscription, 

George W. Martin, '' " 

John R. Sherman, " " 

John H. Mumford, 

James Mumford, . 

Edw d Brinley, 2d subscription, 

Edw d Martin, 

John P. Mann, " 

John P. Mann, for Mary Scott, 2d subscription, 

John C. Phillips, 

Katharine Skinner, ..... 

John H. Wheelwright, 2d subscription, 



36050 



300 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

February 3, 1812. William Littlefield and William Crooke, ap- 
pointed to collect the first instalment of the above subscription, 
and they are directed to deposit the money in the Rhode Island 
Union Bank, to the credit of Trinity Church. 

Easter Monday, March 30, 1812. Samuel Whitehorne elected 
Senior Warden, and Robert Robinson Junior Warden. 

Vestrymen: Francis Brinley, Benj. Gardiner, Henry Sherburne, 
William Crooke, William Littlefield, Robert N. Auchmuty, Benj. 
B. Mumford, Simeon Martin, John P. Mann, John Wood, Edward 
Brinley, Sam 1 Whitehorne, Stephen T. Northam, Edward Easton, 
Robert Robinson, John G. Whitehorne, Silas Dean. 

Benj. B. Mumford, Clerk of the Vestry. John Springer, 260 Sex- 
ton, with a salary of $50 per annum. 

The selection of an organist was left with the Vestry. 

Messrs. Francis Brinley, Auchmuty, Gardiner, Northam, Martin 
and Sam 1 Whitehorne, delegates to the convention. 

The thanks of the Congregation were extended to Levi Tower 
and Samuel O. Auchmuty for their respective services during the 
past year. 

April 1, 1 81 2. Samuel O. Auchmuty was elected organist, with 
a salary of $150 per annum. 

260 From the time of his election as above, Mr. Springer performed the 
duties of sexton of the Church down to Easter, 1840, without interruption. 
At that time he addressed the following note to the Vestry. He was born 
March, 1770, and died November 4, 1850. 

To the Wardens and Vestrymen of Trinity Church, Newport. 

Gentlemen : 

I have served as Sexton of Trinity Church for the past thirty years, 
and have endeavored faithfully to perform the duties of said office, and 
would most cheerfully continue so to do, did not my age prevent it. I am 
now seventy-one years old, and feel that I ought to withdraw, and I there- 
fore respectfully request that you will not consider me a candidate for said 
situation. 

May 1 2th, 1840. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 301 

May 20, 1812. Voted: that John G. Whitehorne and Capt. 
Northam have the trees around the Church-yard trimmed and cut 
agreeably to their judgment. 

August 3, 181 2. Voted: that $20 be presented to Mr. Levi 
Tower, for his services while Clerk of the Church. 

December 21, 1812. Baptized Richard, the property of Margaret 
Nowell. 261 Sponsors, Cudgo Gibbs, Harry Vaughn and Margaret 
Bours. Also Sarah Wilson, daughter of James and Sarah Danzell ; 
Sponsors, Cudgo Gibbs, Catharine Nowell and Margaret Hours. 

February 8, 1813. Voted: that in future no person shall be al- 
lowed to order the sexton to dig any grave in the church-yard, nor 
shall the sexton dig any grave in the church-} aid without the di- 
rection of the Wardens, and in their absence, by the order and di- 
rection of the Clerk of the Vestry. 

April 12, 1 8 1 3 . The Senior Warden laid before the Vestry Mr. 
Wheaton's, the Rector's, letter, praying for an increase of salary, 
and it being addressed to the congregation as well as to the Vestry, 
Voted : that the Rector be requested to request the gentlemen of 
the Congregation to remain after divine service in the afternoon of 
Sunday next, to take into consideration the subject-matter of the 

Rector's letter.' 3,2 

. — v 

2fil The Nowells, of South Carolina, were much in Newport, Elizabeth 
Warden Nowell "lovely in person and amiable in manners," daughter of 
Edward Brown Nowell, and granddaughter of Dr. Lionel Chalmer, of 
Charleston, died here in 1820, at the age of 19 years. Her oldest brother, 
Edward Saville Nowell, lieutenant of marines, U. S. N., also died here. 
They were both buried in the church-yard. 

262 Newport, 12th April, [813. 

To the Wardens, Vestrymen and Congregation of Trinity Church in 
Newport, in the State of Rhode Island. 
After a residence among you of two years and nearly six months, it is 
with pleasure I can say, that the utmost harmony has continually pre- 
vailed in the Church ; that much attention and kindness have been shown 



3 02 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

April 1 8, 1813. At a meeting of the congregation, the Rector's 
letter was read, and after mature deliberation it was 

Voted and resolved : that it is inexpedient to raise the Rector's 
salary during the present year. 

Easter Monday, April 19, 181 3. The Wardens, Vestry and 
other officers of the Church were re-elected. 



me, and that my salary has ever been paid with scrupulous punctuality. 
Exertions, too, have not been wanting to perpetuate the temporal inte- 
rests of the Church by the establishment of a permanent fund. While I 
congratulate you on those pleasant events, it is with pain I behold the 
gloomy state of our political affairs, and the consequent distresses and 
calamities with which this town is visited. 

Under all these circumstances, it is not without much reluctance I feel 
myself obliged to make further demands upon your goodness, in order 
that according to divine appointment, I may live of the gospel. 

You will no doubt recollect the conditions on which I accepted the 
rectorship of your Church were : that if on trial my present salary should 
be found insufficient for a decent and competent support, the congrega- 
tion, on a fair representation, would not fail to make it such. 

I find, since I have been at housekeeping, that my expenditures have 
exceeded my income, which obliges me, at this difficult time, to make 
this statement to you, that it may " stir up your minds by way of remem- 
brance." 

With sentiments of esteem and respect, 

I remain your obedient, humble servt., 

S. Wheaton. 

The following letter, in reply to the above, was addressed to the Rev d 
Mr. Wheaton : 

Newport, April 23d, 1813. 
Rev d Sir: 

The undersigned, a committee appointed by the Congregation of Trin- 
ity Church, to communicate to you their determination in relation to your 
request for an increase of salary, do themselves the honor to enclose the 
vote of the congregation on that subject. 

We did ourselves the pleasure yesterday of waiting on you for the pur- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAN/h 303 

Charles Manchester was elected organist, to be paid at the rate of 
$55 per annum. 

Delegates to the Convention : Francis Brinley, Benj. Gardiner, 
Stephen T. Northam, Simeon Martin and Samuel Whitehorne. 

Voted: that seven members shall form and constitute a quorum, 
at their meetings, and that they are hereby empowered to transact 
all business that may or shall come before them, and the business 
so done and transacted by them shall be obligatory upon the con- 
gregation, as if done and transacted by a greater number. 

October 5, 18 13. Charles Welles, 263 of the privateer Dart, a 
native of St. John's, was buried by Rev d Mr. Wheaton. 

December 6, 18 13. Voted : that the Rector, Rev d Mr. Wheaton, 
be and he is hereby requested to preach a sermon for the benefit of 
the Church at Greenfield, Massachusetts, after the Holy Days hav- 
ing expired, agreeable to their letters and the Bishop's recommenda- 
tion. 

January 10, 18 14. Voted : that Samuel Whitehorne, Stephen T. 
Northam and Silas Dean be a committee to investigate the state of 
the permanent fund, and that they devise some method for complet- 
ing it as speedily as possible, and also to consider and form a plan 
for the better support of the Church in the meantime, till the fund 
can be brought into operation. 

pose of announcing and explaining to you the vote, and the views and 
motives of the Congregation in adopting it. It was a vote passed without 
a dissenting voice; and our object in waiting on you was to make you 
sensible that the distress of the times justified the proceeding on the part 
of the congregation. 

We are, with sentiments of great respect, 

Your obedient, humble servants. 

The above is from an unsigned draft of a letter. 

21:3 The Dart, a British privateer, was raptured off Point Judith by the 
U. S. Revenue Cutter Vigilant, and brought into Newport. Welles, her 
first lieutenant, was killed in the action. 



3 o 4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

February 7, 18 14. Voted : that Mr. Benj. Hazard be requested 
to draft a petition to the General Assembly of this State, to raise by 
lottery $8000, clear of all expenses, which sum, when realized, be 
added to the permanent fund of the Church. 

Voted : that Mr. Hazard 264 be requested to present and advocate 
the same in the Legislature. 

Voted: that this Vestry cannot approve of the request of the 
Rector, to call the congregation together, for the purpose of increas- 
ing the tax on the pews. 

March 7, 18 14. Voted : that a subscription be opened, and that 
a sum be raised (more or less) and be presented to the Rector, as a 
compensation from the subscribers, and that his correspondence 
will be laid before the congregation and a decision had upon the 
same. 

April 4, 1814. Voted: that Messrs. Northam, S. Martin and S. 
Dean be a committee to wait upon Benj. Hazard, Esq., and obtain 
his legal opinion relating to the lease given by Richard Harrison, 
Esq., of New York, to this Church, and whether Mr. Harrison is 
not bound to keep the said estate in as good repair, and to prevent 
it from falling into a yearly decay, as when he received it. 



264 ,sT\ fy. . Benjamin Hazard, son of Thomas 

SJ. ft C^% &SL- cL „ G Hazard and Mary Easton, his 

wife, was born in Middletown, September 9, 1774. He graduated at 
Brown University in 1792, was admitted at the bar in 1796, commenced 
the practice of law in Newport, and here followed his profession with 
honor during the rest of his days. As early as 1809 he was elected a 
Representative to the General Assembly, and only retired from that posi- 
tion in 1840. His ability was marked, and his integrity was never ques- 
tioned. He married Harriet Lyman, daughter of Major Daniel Lyman 
and Mary Wanton (the beautiful daughter "of John Wanton) his wife. In 
the Wanton house on Broad street, now Broadway, he resided, and there 
died, March 10, 1841, aged 67 years. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 305 



CHAPTER XX. 

1817-1821. 

Easter Monday, April 11, 1814. Wm. C. Gardner elected 
Senior Warden and Henry Shaw Junior Warden. 

Vestrymen: Francis Brinley, Benj. Gardiner, William Crooke, 
Wm. Littlefield, Benj. B. Mumford, Simeon Martin, John Wood, 
Edward Brinley, Samuel Whitehorne, Stephen T. Northam, Edw. 
Easton, Robert Robinson, John G. Whitehorne, Silas Dean and 
Edw. Martin. 

Benj. B. Mumford, Clerk of the Vestry, and John Springer, 
Sexton. 

Charles Manchester was continued as organist, with a salary of 
S75 per annum. 

Delegates to the Convention: Francis Brinley, S. Martin, Benj. 
Gardiner, Stephen T. Northam, and William C. Gardner. 

Voted : that whereas, Miss Ruth Gibbs, in behalf of her family, 
has prayed by letter, permission to erect a monument in the Church- 
yard, that the prayer of said letter be, and is hereby referred to the 
consideration of the next Vestry, and that their opinion and de- 
cision thereon shall be binding upon the Congregation, as if voted 
this day. 

Voted: that whereas, the Rev d Mr. Wheaton, the Rector of this 
Church, has requested an increase of salary, and that the letter of 
the Committee, dated August 24, 1810, who were authorized by this 
Congregation to invite him to take charge of this Church, be laid 
before the Congregation, which being done, after duly considering 
the premises and knowing the limited circumstances of the Church 



3 o6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

revenue and the impracticability of augmenting the taxes on the 
pews, that it is at the present moment inexpedient to raise his 
salary. 

Voted : that the grateful thanks of this Congregation be made 
Col. Henry Sherburne, for twenty-one years of faithful services as a 
vestryman of this Church. 

May 2, 1814. Voted: that the Senior Warden be requested to 
furnish the Rector with $100, to meet his expenses, to attend the 
General Episcopal Convention, to be convened in the city of Phila- 
delphia. 

June 6, 1 8 14. Voted: that the thanks of this Vestry be, and 
they are hereby made to Benj. Gardiner, Esq., for his attending 
the General Convention, and for his correct report of its proceed- 
ings. 

June 21, 1814. Voted: that the application of Major-Gen. Shel- 
don for permission to ring the bell, and to suspend several lighted 
lamps in the lantern, in case of an alarm, under the immediate direc- 
tion of the Church Sexton, be and is hereby granted, provided that 
Maj.-Gen. Sheldon shall cause one or more discreet persons to be 
stationed in the Church lantern, there to remain so long as the 
lighted lamps shall continue burning, to prevent the steeple from 
taking fire. 

July 4, 1 8 14. Voted: that whereas Mrs. Mary Gibbs having re-' 
quested this Vestry for liberty to dig a vault in the west end of the 
Church-yard, for the purpose of interring her family therein, be and 
is hereby permitted and authorized to dig a vault 16 feet by 12 feet, 
she paying for the same $100, and that the ground covered by 
said vault remain to her, her heirs and assigns forever, in fee 
simple. 

September 5, 1814. Voted: that the sum of $30 be paid by the 
Senior Warden to the Rev d Mr. Wheaton, for his attendance at the 
convention of the Diocese, to be holden at Portsmouth. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 307 

October 17, 1814. Voted : that the Senior Warden be authorized 
to hire a sum of money sufficient to purchase ten cords of wood, in- 
cluding the cost of sawing and piling, and present the same to Mr. 
Wheaton, the Rector of the Church. 

Voted: that the Wardens be requested to take around the box 
every Sunday afternoon, immediately after the sermon, to collect 
such donations and pew rents as may be given and paid to them. 

March 13, 1815. Voted: that in consequence of the application 
of the Rev d Mr. Wheaton, stating his pressing necessities, the 
Senior Warden be, and he is hereby authorized to advance him $51 1, 
and that this Vestry will lay the same before the Congregation on 
Easter Monday next, for their approval. 

Voted : that whereas, the Rev a Mr. Wheaton having made a 
verbal communication to this Vestry, stating, in purport, that an in- 
crease of salary is desirable, that Benj. Gardiner, Esq., W m C. Gard- 
ner, Senior Warden, Henry Shaw, Junior Warden, and Benj. B. 
Mumford, Clerk of the Vestry, be a committee to wait upon him, 
and receive his request in writing, stating fully his views upon that 
subject, for the purpose of laying the same before the congregation 
on Easter Monday next. 

March 20, 1815. The Vestry having taken into consideration 
the communication of the Rev d Mr. Wheaton, of the 6 th inst., did 
present him with $50, are obliged from various circumstances, 
candidly to inform him, that they can do no more, and that they 
cannot pledge themselves to supply him with his wood for the en- 
suing winter. 

Easter Monday, March 27, 181 5. The officers of the Church 
and the Vestrymen were re-elected, and Henry Shaw and Levi 
Tower were added to the Vestry. 

Voted : that seven members of the Vestry shall form a quorum. 

Voted : that the Trustee of the permanent fund shall make a 



3oS ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

statement of all outstanding notes and subscriptions due to said 
permanent fund, together with the amount collected and funded, 
Easter Monday next. 

Voted : that the tax due from Mr. Levi Tower, 205 on his pew, No. 
II, in consideration of his service, by directing the organist and 
setting the psalms, be remitted ; but the amount thus remitted ex- 
tends to the claims the Church has upon Mr. Tower since his 
occupancy of said pew, but does not extend to any demands against 
said pew previous to that time. 

May I, 1 8 15. Mr. Manchester was elected organist on a salary 
of $75 per annum; but on the 5 th of June the Wardens were in- 
structed " to pay off Mr. Manchester, and acquaint him that the 
Church has no further need of his services as an organist." 

Baptized, May 4, 181 5, William and Mary, both the property of 
Charles Baring, Esq. Sponsors, Joseph, Thomas and Nancy Bar- 
ing, and Nancy, a free woman of color. 

June 12. Voted: that the Wardens, with W ,n Crooke, Esq., 
wait upon Miss Mary Towle and thank her for her polite and kind 
offer to officiate upon the Church organ, and request she would be 
pleased to accept $100 per annum for the same. 

Voted : that the Wardens, with Samuel Whitehorne, William 
Crooke, Edw. Brinley, Benj. Gardiner and Simeon Martin, Esquires, 
be a committee to devise ways and means for the better maintain- 
ance and support of the Church, and that they report in writing at 
our next meeting. 



265 Levi Tower graduated at Brown University in 1800, and found em- 
ployment as assistant in Robert Rogers's school, in which school he be- 
came the successor of Mr. Rogers. For many years he was a prominent 
and successful instructor, until the infirmities of years made it necessary 
for him to give up teaching. He died June 4, 1854, aged 78 years. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 309 

June 27, 1815. Voted: that the report of the committee ap- 
pointed at our last meeting, be accepted. 

Voted: that S. T. Northam and J. G. Whitehorne be a commit 
tee to call upon each owner of a pew in the Church, and procure 
their consent in writing, to relinquish the use and occupation of 
their pew or pews to the Church, for the sole and exclusive purpose 
of having them hired out yearly at public auction, for five succes- 
sive years, ^\\ each Piaster Monday, from Easter Monday, A.D., 
1 Sit\ to the highest bidder, and the rent that may accrue by their 
hire, shall be applied for the support of the Church and its officers, 
and at the expiration of the said five years, the pews shall revert to 
their present owners, or their heirs or assigns, free of all incum- 
brance whatsoever, that may accrue within that period, and that 
said committee report as soon as may be convenient. 

October 2, 1 S 1 5. Voted: that a committee be appointed tore- 
pair all the damage to the Church and steeple, occasioned by the 
recent violent gale of wind, and that the Wardens be requested to 
hire $200 to meet these necessary expenses. 

November 6, 181 5. Voted: that ten cords of oak wood be pur- 
chased by the Senior Warden, and presented to the Rev d Mr. 
Wheaton, and that he pay for the carting, sawing and piling, charg- 
ing the whole expense to the Church. 

December 6, 181 5. Voted: that all accounts against the Church, 
that shall or may hereafter lay dormant and unclaimed for six suc- 
cessive years, agreeable to the statute of limitation, of this State, 
shall not be allowed or paid, but be considered as given to the 
Church. 

Voted : that the Vestry recommend to the congregation to give 
on each Sunday one cent to each individual of their families attend- 
ing Church, to be deposited in the contribution box ; and that this 
laudable practice commence the first Sunday in January next. 



3 io ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

AT A VESTRY MEETING, 

H olden on the 6th day of December, A. D. 1815. 

Voted, Unanimously, That the Vestry recommend to the Congrega- 
tion to give One Cent on each Sunday, to each individual of their 
Family attending Church, to be deposited in the Contribution-box, 
when the same shall be brought round immediately after the Sermon, 
and that this laudable practice commence the first Sunday in January 
next. 

Voted, That the above Vote be printed, and a Copy placed in each 
Pew of the Church. 

A true Copy, as extracted from the Records : — 

Attest, BENJAMIN B. MUMFORD, 

Clerk of the Vestry. 

February 5, 18 16. Voted: that the Vestry recommend to the 
Rector, to cause the bell in future to ring but ten minutes, and to 
toll but ten minutes. 

Voted : that pews No. 6, 10, 24, 55, 56 and 60 be disposed of at 
auction to the highest bidder, on the third Monday of May next, 
unless the amount due on them be paid previous to that day. 

Easter Monday, April 17, 18 16. Edward Brinley elected Senior 
Warden and Stephen T. Northam, Junior Warden. The Vestry- 
men were re-elected, with the exception of Henry Shaw. 

Voted : that a tax of ten dollars be assessed on the pews below, 
and that a tax of two dollars be assessed on the pews above stairs. 

Voted : that Levi Tower be clerk of the Church, at a salary of 
$$0. 

Voted : that no money belonging to Trinity Church, in Newport, 
shall be hereafter expended by the Vestry, for any other purpose 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 3.1 

than to comply with the appropriation made on the previous Easter 
Monday ; for such necessary expenses as may occur for the Rec- 
tor's attendance on Convention and for all necessary repairs to the 
Church property. 

May 6, 18 16. Voted unanimously : that the proceedings of this 
Vestry forevefr hereafter be kept a profound secret, and that no 
communication whatever shall be made known, either of opinions, 
arguments or form of vote, to any one out of the Vestry ; except it 
be to a member of this body who may happen not to be present at 
a Vestry meeting. 

Voted unanimously : that this Vestry accepts with sentiments of 
real pleasure and esteem, the kind and generous offer of Miss 
Catharine Tweedy, of placing the portrait of our late venerable 
pastor, the Rev d Mr. Honyman, 266 in the Vestry room; and that 
the Clerk of the Vestry furnish Miss Tweedy with a copy of this 
vote, as a mark of our sincere attachment to so amiable a character, 
and to her for her politeness and attention. 

May 26, 1 8 16. A copy of the Constitution for the Church in 
this State being submitted and compared, article by article, with the 
old Constitution now in force; thereupon voted: that Articles Nos. 
1 and 2 be approved. 

Voted : that the 3d Article be and the same is hereby approved, 
with this amendment, that the words " not exceeding four " be 
added after the word " delegates." 

Voted: that Articles 4th, 5th and 6th be approved. 

Voted : that Article 7th be approved, with the amendment, that 
the words " by any two members " be added, and the words " two 
votes " be stricken out. 



5 This picture is the one referred to in a notice of Rev. James Hony- 
man, page 95, where the gift is erroneously credited to Mrs. Malbone. 



3«2 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that Article 8th be approved. 

July I, 1816. Voted: that the Rector, with Messrs. Brinley and 
Samuel Whitehorne, be a committee to attend quarterly the ex- 
amination of Mr. Rodman's school, and see that the charity scholars 
are taught those rudiments of learning as prescribed by the will of 
the late Mr. Kay, and that they report quarterly to the Vestry the 
progress of said children in their learning. 

October 2, 1816. Voted unanimously: that the thanks of this 
Vestry be presented to the Rev d Mr. Morrice A. Lance, for officiat- 
ing in our church during the absence of our Rector, and that the 
Clerk of the Vestry be directed to transmit to him a copy of this 
vote, as a testimony of our gratitude and esteem. 

October 2, 18 16. Buried Godfrey Wainwood, aged 77 years. 

October 7, 1816. Voted: that the Rector, Messrs. Benj. Gardi- 
ner, Samuel Whitehorne, William Hunter and Win, Crooke, be a 
committee to prepare a new charter for the Church, and as soon as 
it is prepared, to report the same to this Vestry. 

October 20, 18 16. Voted: that the charter reported by the com- 
mittee, consisting of ten sections, having been distinctly read over, 
section by section, be, and the same is hereby adopted. 

Voted : that the Rector be requested to notify the Congregation 
to meet at 12 o'clock, on Monday next, for the purpose of laying 
before them the aforesaid charter for their approval, amendment or 
rejection. 

Meeting of the Congregation, October 28, 18 16; the Rector 
being absent, Voted: that the Hon. Benj. Gardiner be^ moderator 
for this meeting, 

Voted unanimously: that the Charter of Incorporation, consist- 
ing of ten sections, being read over, section by section, be, and the 
same is hereby received, approved and adopted, and that it be pre- 
sented to the Hon ble General Assembly at this, their present Octo- 
ber Session, for ratification and enactment. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 313 

Voted : that the petition addressed to the Hon ble General Assem- 
bly, praying for the adoption of the aforesaid charter 268 of incorpora- 
tion, being read over by the Clerk of this Congregation, be, and is 
hereby approved, and that he, as Clerk of the Vestry and Congre- 
gation, sign the same, expressive of the sentiments and wishes of 
this congregation. 

Voted unanimously : that the Hon ble Benj. Gardiner, Wm, C. 
Gardner and Benj. Hazard, Esquires, be a committee to present the 
charter and petition to the Hon bl ° General Assembly for a new in- 
corporation, and press its adoption. 

To the Hon ble General Assembly, to be holden at Providence, R 
I., on the fourth Monday of October, 18 16. 

The petition of the Minister, Church Wardens, Vestry and 
Congregation of Trinity Church in Newport, R. I., respectfully 
sheweth : 

That from experience and the occurrence of difficulties and in- 
conveniences, they find that their present charter of incorporation, 
granted them in the year 1769, is inadequate in its powers and pro- 
visions for the proper and beneficial management of their business 
and concerns ; and they pray that a new Act of Incorporation, sub- 
stantially in conformity to the draft of the act herewith presented, 
may be enacted by the General Assembly ; and they, as in duty 
bound, will ever pray. 

By order and in behalf of the said Minister, Wardens, Vestry and 
Congregation of Trinity Church, Newport, R. I. 

Benj. B. Mum ford, 
Sect'y of the Vestry and Congregation. 

Newport, 28th October, 1816. 

November 4, 18 16. Voted: that the Secretary of this Vestry 



268 See appendix. 
21 



3 i4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

be, and is hereby required to procure a large sheet of vellum parch- 
ment, and have written thereon, in a strong, legible hand, the new 
charter, and have the same duly authenticated by the Secretary of 
this State ; the whole expense to be paid by the Senior Warden out 
of the Church funds. 

Voted: that William Hunter, Samuel Whitehorne, Esq'rs, and 
Benj. B. Mumford be a committee to draw up a code of By-Laws, for 
the future government of this corporation. 

Voted: that Samuel Whitehorne, Esq., and Benj. B. Mumford 
be a committee to purchase a new set of books for this corporation. 

Voted : that the Secretary of this Vestry be requested, and he is 
hereby authorized to procure a brass seal, of a reasonable size, for 
this corporation, and have the same handsomely engraved on the 
outer circle: "Trinity Church, Newport, R. I., Incorporated 1769," 
in the centre to have a raised cross, the head of the cross to be en- 
circled with these words : " God Send Grace." 

Voted : that the Rev d Rector be requested to commence the 
Evening Service in future, till the spring commences, precisely at 
half past two o'clock, and that he would be pleased to notify the 
congregation from the desk next Sunday. 

December 2, 18 16. Voted: that a note be addressed by the 
Secretary to the Rev d Rector, and request that he would be pleased, 
should it meet his approbation, to instruct the clerk to omit the 
afternoon chaunt, at least during the winter season. 

January 6, 18 17. Voted: that the grateful thanks of this Vestry, 
in behalf of the congregation, be made to Miss Sarah Freebody, for 
her present of a large bible to the Church, and that she be furnished 
with a copy of this vote. 

Meeting of the corporation at Trinity Church, January 13, 18 17. 
Voted : that the new charter, adopted by the General Assembly of 
this State, at their October session, 18 16, consisting often sections, 
having been carefully read over, section by section, and after mature 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 315 

deliberation, the same be and is hereby fully approved and adopted 
as the charter of this corporation. 

Voted : that Samuel Fowler Gardner be and is hereby elected 
Treasurer of this corporation till Easter next. 

January 14, 1817. Voted: that Samuel Fowler Gardner, Esquire, 
the Treasurer, be and he is hereby authorized and empowered to 
dispose and to sell the three shares in the [Rhode Island] Union 
Hank, owned by this corporation, for the most they will command, 
and apply the proceeds, first, to reduce the note of $400 to $300 
and, secondly, the surplus to the discharge of those debts that now 
exist against the Church. 

March 3, 18 17. Voted : that Messrs. Benj. Gardiner and Stephen 
T. Northam be a committee to wait upon Mr. Searl, and obtain his 
opinion in writing upon the responsibility of Mr. Harrison, arising 
upon the lease given by this corporation to him, and whether Mr. 
Harrison is not bound to indemnify the corporation for the destruc- 
tion of the house, stable, out-houses and fences, that have occurred. 

Voted : that the Vestry coincide with Rev d Mr. Wheaton in senti- 
ment, upon the utility of having divine service performed in the 
Church exclusive of Sundays, and they hope he will open the 
Church every Sunday evening, and on such other evenings as he 
may deem it conducive to the interest of the Church and the pro- 
motion of piety. 

March 6, 18 17. The committee appointed by the last Vestry, to 
obtain Mr. Searl's opinion in writing, upon the lease given to Mr. 
Harrison, of the Kay Estate, having presented and read the same, 
it is therefore voted : that the report of the committee, and also Mr. 
Searl's written opinion, be and is hereby received and accepted. 

Voted : that the Vestry deem it absolutely expedient to prosecute 
Mr. Harrison upon his lease, for the waste and destruction made 
upon the Kay Estate, leased him by the " Minister, Wardens and 
Vestry of Trinity Church," 



3 i6 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted: that Messrs. Benj. Gardiner, Silas Dean, and Steph. T. 
Northam be a committee to carry into execution the preceding 
vote, at any time they may deem it most expedient. 

Voted : that the committee employ as attorneys, to bring this suit, 
and defend the same, Messrs. Searl, Hunter and Hazard. 

Easter Monday, 7th day of April, 18 17. Meeting in the Church. 
Present: Edward Brinley, Silas Dean, James Mumford, Levi 
Tower, Robert Robinson, Wm. C. Gardner, Samuel Whitehorne, 
Samuel Fowler Gardner, Thomas White, Edward Martin, Henry 
Shaw, Dr. Charles Cotton, Stephen T. Northam, Benj. B. Mum- 
ford. 

The following officers were elected : 
Edward Brinley, Senior Warden. 
James Mumford, Junior Warden. 
Benj. B. Mumford, Secretary. 

Levi Tower, Clerk, to set the psalmody. Salary, $50 per annum. 
Elizabeth Fowler, Organist. Salary, $100. 
John Springer, Sexton. Salary, $40. 

Vestrymen : Benj. Gardiner, Benj. B. Mumford, Stephen T. 
Northam, John Wood, Samuel Whitehorne, Robert Robinson, Jno. 
G. Whitehorne, Silas Dean, Levi Tower, Samuel Fairweather Gar- 
diner, Robinson Potter. 

Dr. Charles Cotton, Treasurer. 

Hon. Simeon Martin, in consequence of his removing from town, 
declined a re-election as vestryman. 

Delegates to the State Convention : Samuel Whitehorne, Steph. 
T. Northam, and Benj. B. Mumford. 

May 8, 18 17. Voted : that the committee authorized at a former 
meeting to prosecute Mr. Harrison for the destruction and waste 
committed upon the Kay Estate, employ such counsel as they may 
deem expedient, either in or out of the State. 

Voted : that the Sexton be directed, under the direction of Messrs. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 317 

Wood and Brinley, to set and erect all the gravestones that have 
fallen down in the church-yard, and cause such trees to be cut down 
as they may think proper. 

May 12, 1 8 17. The Treasurer was directed to pay to the Junior 
Warden, and he to the Rev d Mr. Wheaton, $40, for the purpose of 
defraying Mr. Wheaton's expenses to the Episcopal General Con- 
vention, to be holden in New York on the 20th inst. 

Messrs. Robinson and Potter were a committee to have the bell 
immediately repaired. 

June 2, 18 1 7. Voted: that the committee heretofore authorized 
to prosecute Mr. Harrison, be and is hereby directed to request Mr. 
Wells, counsellor-at-law, of the city of New York, to effect, if pos- 
sible, a compromise with Richard Harrison, Esq., of the same city, 
for the waste and destruction committed upon the Kay Estate ; and 
if no settlement can be effected with him, then to commence a suit 
against him for damages and reparation for the misimprovement of 
the estate aforesaid. 

July 8, 18 17. Voted: that the thanks of this Vestry be made to 
John Wells, Esq., Counsellor-at-Law, in the city of New York, for 
his distinguished attention, for his law information, given gratuit- 
ously to Benjamin Gardiner, Esq., in behalf of this Church ; and 
that the Secretary be and he is hereby directed, to furnish him with 
a transcript of this vote, as a testimony of the great obligation they 
feel themselves under for the essential and important services ren- 
dered this Society. 

Voted : that the Secretary be directed to purchase a folio Prayer 
Book, for the use of the Church, of Messrs. J. & T. Swords, at New 
York, not exceeding the cost of #20. 

August 4, 1817. Benj. B. Mumford, a committee to inquire for 
and select a suitable person for organist. 

Voted: that MissTowle be paid all that is due to her as organist, 
previous to her leaving Newport. 



3 i 8 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : that whereas Miss Mary Towle being about leaving New- 
port, and she having been so kind as to officiate for several years 
past upon the organ of the Church, the Secretary be, and he is 
hereby directed, to furnish her with a copy of this vote, as a testi- 
mony of our respect and esteem for her personally, and as appro- 
batory of her judicious deportment during our acquaintance with 
her. 

August 1 8, 1 8 17. Whereas, the Rev d Samuel Wydown, 269 a Bap- 
tist Minister, having applied to this Vestry for testimonials, for the 
purpose of obtaining Holy Orders, and we having been acquainted 
with him for these two years past, it is therefore voted : that we 
believe him to be a moral and pious character, and that he is attached 
to the doctrines and discipline of the Episcopal Church. 

September 11, 18 17. Buried at Bristol, R. I., by Rev d Mr. 
Wheaton, Mrs. Elizabeth Griswold, wife of Rev d Alexander Viet 
Griswold, Rector of St. Michael's, Bristol, aged 49 years. 

September 17, 1817. Miss Eliza Davis was elected organist, with 
a salary of $60 per annum. 

Voted : that the four first pews, on the west side of the broad 
aisle, be made into two pews, painted on the inside, and labelled on 
the outside " For Strangers," and kept for that purpose. 

[The usual vote for the purchase of wood for the Rector was 
passed at this meeting.] 

October 6, 181 7. Voted: that the Church edifice be given to 
the members of St. Paul's Lodge, for their installation; and that 



* 69 The Standing Committee rejected the application of the Rev. Mr. 
Wydown, and the Vestry, on the 2d of February, 1818, realizing that they 
had been hasty, and had not with sufficient care looked into the character 
of the applicant, acknowledged their mistake in a vote passed at that 
time. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 319 

Messrs. Northam and Potter be a committee to wait upon Mr. 
Wheaton, for his approbation. 

Voted : that the vote passed the 14th of May, 1797, be so far re- 
pealed as relates to the collecting the $12 therein mentioned, and 
that the Senior Warden in future collect that amount for all per- 
sons interred in the new burial ground. 269 " 

November 24, 1817. Voted unanimously: that the grateful 
thanks of this Vestry, in behalf of the congregation, be made to the 
gentleman who so generously and unsolicited, gave to the Per- 
manent Fund of this Church Five Hundred Dollars ; and that the 
Rev d Mr. Wheaton be requested to transmit a certified copy of this 
vote to Wm. Dehon, Esq., of Boston, and by him to the benevolent 
donor, who requested his name might be kept secret ; but if it be 
consistent with the feelings of the donor, the Vestry would be happy 
to record his name, for so disinterested and kind act. 

Voted: that the thanks of this Vestry be made to William 
Dehon, Esq., of Boston, for the distinguished service rendered this 
Church, by receiving and transmitting five hundred dollars, pre- 
sented to the Permanent Fund of this Church. 

January 6, 1818. Voted: that the Rev d Mr. Webb take the 
school-house, upon the same terms that Mr. Rodman had hitherto 
done ; that he take immediate possession of the same under the 
direction of the Rector and Wardens, and at the end of his term to 
return the school-house in as good order, wear and tear always ex- 
cepted, as he receives it. 

Easter Monday, March 23, 1818. Present: The Rector, Oliver 
H. Perry, Edward T. Waring, Silas Dean, James Mumford, Saun- 
ders Malbone, Samuel F. Gardiner, Charles Cotton, Samuel Fowler 



269a T j ie new burial ground was a small strip of land added to the grave- 
yard, by purchase, at the extreme west end. 



3 2o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Gardner, Levi Tower, William Crooke, Benj. Gardiner, John B. Lyon, 
Samuel Whitehorne, John G. Whitehorne, Wm. Shaw, Benj. Haz- 
ard, William C. Gibbs 270 and Richard K. Randolph. 

Dr. Charles Cotton elected Senior Warden. 

S. Fowler Gardner, Junior Warden. 

Vestrymen : Benj. Gardiner, Edw. Brinley, Benj. B. Mumford, 
Steph. T. Northam, Silas Dean, William Crooke, Saml Whitehorne, 
John G. Whitehorne, John P. Mann, Levi Tower, Robinson Potter. 

Richard K. Randolph, Treasurer. 

John B. Lyon, Sec'y to Corporation and Clerk to Vestry. 

Miss Eliza Davis was chosen organist, salary $60, whose duty it 
shall be to attend and perform on every Sunday, Christmas and 
Good Friday. 

Delegates to the State Convention : Benj. Gardiner, Samuel 
Whitehorne, Stephen T. Northam, Benj. B. Mumford. 

Voted: that the tax of $10 on each pew be continued. 

On motion of Stephen T. Northam it was voted : that a committee 
of five, Wm. C. Gibbs, Benj. Hazard, Edw. Brinley, Wm. Crooke 
and John P. Mann, be appointed to take into consideration the ex- 
pediency of revising our present charter, and report to the corpora- 
tion on the first Monday in May next. 

Voted : that the practice of carrying the contribution box round 
the Church on Sundays be discontinued, but the quarterly collec- 
tion be continued. 



* > ^ William C. Gibbs was the son of 

C4*?*~& — iSl &-&ZJ George Gibbs. He was born 

February 10, 1790, and died 
February 24, 1871. His wife was Mary Kane, daughter of Charles Kane, 
of New York, to whom he was married in 1822. In the political excite- 
ment in 1821 he was elected Governor of the State of Rhode Island, and 
held the office till 1824. He had also represented Newport in the 
Legislature, and for many years was a prominent citizen of Newport. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 321 

April 7, 1818. Voted: that the fence around the two-acre lot 
be immediately repaired, at the expense of the Church. 

Voted : That the committee who were to attend to the above be 
requested to make an arrangement with the Rector, by allowing 
him $24 per year for the rent of the said lot, and the Church take 
the lot under their own direction. 

Voted : that in consideration of services rendered the Rector and 
his family by Doct. Edmund T. Waring, that the tax now due from 
him be relinquished. 

Voted : that the owners of the following pews being in arrears for 
taxes, that the pews be advertised for sale immediately — Nos. 35, 
50, 52, 60, 61, 70 and 89. 

Meeting of the Corporation, May 4, 18 18. 

The committee appointed on Easter Monday made report in part; 
thereupon it was 

Voted : that the following amendments be made to the Charter, 
viz. : 

" Be it enacted by the General Assembly, and by the authority 
thereof it is enacted, that the election of officers by the Corporation 
of Trinity Church shall be by ballot without nomination." 

Voted : that the committee heretofore appointed upon the subject 
of amendments to the Charter be continued, and directed to ascer- 
tain the powers and duties of the Rectors of this Church previous 
to the charter last granted, and also the powers and duties of Rec- 
tors of other Episcopal Churches in this State, and to report to the 
congregation on Thursday next, at eleven o'clock, a.m. 

The following motion was made by James Mumford, and referred 
to the committee on the revision of the charter : " That the charter 
be so far altered that no pew shall be sold or held responsible for 
the payment of any other charges or expenses, except the actual 
repairs on the church edifice. 



322 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

May 1 8, 1818. The committee to make an arrangement with 
the Rector respecting the two-acre lot, made a verbal report, that 
they had, with the consent of the Rector, rented the lot for five 
years, at an annual rent of $24, the tenant to be at the expense of 
fencing. 

Voted: that the Wardens be authorized to have the steeple re- 
paired and secured immediately. 

Voted : that the Rector be requested to furnish annually, on the 
first of December, a list of the poor of the Church for the use of 
the Vestry. 

Voted : that the Sexton be directed not to deliver the keys of 
the Church to any person except the Wardens or Vestry, without 
an order from one of the Wardens. 

June 3, 18 1 8. Voted : that the Wardens be empowered to have 
the spire painted and the balls and vane gilded. 

June 5,1818. At a meeting of the corporation, the committee 
appointed at Easter, on the revision of the charter, made a verbal 
report, and recommended the adoption of the following : 

" That in the election of any Minister of this Church, as provided 
by the sixth section of the charter, the vote of three-fifths of all the 
members of the corporation shall be required to make a choice, and 
by the same number of votes any Minister of said Church may be 
removed by the corporation ; three months' previous notice of said 
removal having been given to him ; and upon similar notice, any 
such Minister shall at all times be at liberty to withdraw from s d 
Church." 

Whereupon it was voted : that the above bill be passed, and that 
Benj. Hazard and Wm. C. Gibbs, Esquires, be a committee to pre- 
sent the bill passed at the Corporation Meeting, May 4th, and the 
above bill, to the General Assembly at their next session, for their 
sanction, as amendments to the constitution. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 323 

A motion was made that the Charter be so far amended as that 
the Rector shall be admitted into the Vestry, which motion was 
negatived. 

Voted : that the Wardens be authorized and directed to have the 
organ removed as far back as they shall think proper. 

July 1, 1818. Voted: that the Church edifice be painted, with- 
out and within, and whitewashed ; that the trees within the Church- 
yard be cut down below the earth ; that the fences be put in perfect 
repair, and that a committee be appointed to solicit subscriptions to 
defray the expense: O. H. Perry,- 71 Wm. C. Gibbs, Stephen T. 
Northam and Robinson Potter to be that committee. 

August 5, 1 818. Voted : that the floor of the Church be sheathed 
and painted. 

August 21, [818. Voted: that the Wardens be authorized to 
have the outside of the pews painted stone color ; and they were in- 
structed to purchase six yards of silk velvet and gold fringe for the 
desk, etc. 




with his family, occupied the Cham- 
_^ plin pew, No. 14, north aisle, which 
'*'* (/pew is still in the possession of some 
of his descendants. On the wall over it there is a marble tablet, bearing 
this inscription : 

"To the Memory of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, U. S. Navy: 
Born at South Kingston, Rhode Island, August 23, 1785. Died while on 
a Diplomatic Mission to Venezuela, Aug. 23, 1819. 

"His Remains were brought to this Place by order of the Govern- 
ment, in the U. S. ship Lexington, and Re-interred by his Native State, 
in 1827* 

" History records his Public Deeds and Private Worth. 
"This Tablet is erected by his Widow, Elizabeth Champlin Perry, 
August, 1855, as a mark of her continued Affection and Respect for his 
Memory." 

* An error; it should be 1826. 



3 2 4 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

September 2, 18 18. Voted: that the Wardens be authorized to 
have the under part of the benches painted light lead color, and the 
Creed, Commandments, and Lord's Prayer, on the Altar, painted, 
lettered and gilded. 

Voted : that in future no colored people be allowed to sit down 
stairs. 

Voted : that owing to the numbers of the pews being altered, that 
a new register of the pews, as they now are, with the former numbers, 
be recorded on the Vestry books. 

Voted : that the pews belonging to the Church be exposed for 
sale on the 5th inst. at public auction, and if they bring the price 
appraised, or over, to sell them. 

October 12, 18 18. Voted: that the Vestry will not allow the 
carpenters, for their work on the steeple, over $1.50 per day. 

October 18, 18 18. Voted: that the Corporation present the 
Rector with ten cords of wood. 

November 4, 18 18. Voted : that the Vestry grant for the use of 
the Sunday School the belfrey of the Church ; the same to be put 
in repair under the direction of the Wardens. 

December 9, 18 18. Voted: that the Wardens be authorized to 
purchase a foot-stove for the Rector. 

February 3, 18 19. Voted: that the Wardens be authorized to 
purchase a foot-stove for the organist, and direct the sexton to fur- 
nish fire for the same. 

Voted : that Mr. Samuel Whitehorne, the Treasurer of the Per- 
manent Fund, be authorized to give Isaac Winslow and Saunders 
Malbone, Executors of the estate of the late Mrs. C. Malbone, a 
bond of indemnity in case any demands should be presented against 
the estate, to bear an equal proportion, according to the amount 
given by Mrs. Malbone to the Permanent Fund. 

Easter Monday, April 12, 1819. Present: John G. Whitehorne, 
Samuel Whitehorne, William Hunter, E. S. Hunt, Henry Potter, 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 325 

E. T. Waring, Thos. Bush, John P. Mann, Wm. Shaw, Wm. Crooke, 
John Wood, Benj. Hazard, Levi Tower, Benj. Fry, Robinson Potter, 
Henry Bull,- 172 Edward Brinley, Charles Cotton, Saunders Malbone 
and Stephen T. Northam. 

Robinson Potter was chosen Senior Warden. Wm. H Rathbone, 
Junior Warden. Richard K. Randolph, Treasurer. John B.Lyon, 
Sec'>- of Corporation and Clerk of the Vestry. 

Vestrymen : Benj. Gardiner, Edward Brinley, B. B. Mumford, 
Steph. T. Northam, Silas Dean, Wm. Crooke, S. Whitehorne, J. G. 
Whitehorne, John P. Mann, Levi Tower, John Wood. 

Miss Eliza Davis was chosen organist, salary #80. John Springer, 
Sexton. 

Delegates to State Convention : Benj. Gardiner, John P. Mann, 
Steph. T. Northam. 

Voted: that the tax often dollars on each pew be continued. 

Voted : that in consequence of the indisposition of Mr. Wheaton 

in the year , which caused him an extraordinary expenditure, 

that the sum of S96 be and is hereby voted him. 

June 13, 1 8 19. At a meeting of the Corporation held in the 
Church, 



2" was born at Newport, August 29, 1778, and died 

W&ft'lt+ d^L/jZP >0ctober I2 > l8 4 x - He was of the fifth genera- 
te & 'tion from Governor Henry Bull, one of the 
Cs original purchasers of Aquidneck, now the island 
of Rhode Island. Thrown upon his own resources in early life, he began 
business in Newport at the age of sixteen years, and in 1803 was both 
master and supercargo of a vessel bound for the West Indies. In 1807 
he was in business in Newport, and continued to be engaged in commer- 
cial pursuits up to the time of his death. For nearly twenty years he was 
a leading and useful member of the General Assembly, and in 1836 he 
was chosen a Presidential Elector. To the history of the State and town 
he gave much attention, and he wrote a valuable series of papers known 
as "Memoirs of Rhode Island," which were published in the Rhode 
Island Republican. 



326 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Voted : That the Minister be reinstated in the Vestry and placed 
in the same situation he was before the last revision of the Charter. 

Voted : that Wm. Hunter, W. Crooke and J. P. Mann be a com- 
mittee to make what alteration is necessary in the charter for carry- 
ing the above vote into effect, and that they present the same to the 
next meeting of the State Legislature for their sanction. 

July 12, 1 8 19. The Senior Warden reported that Mr. Harrison 
had made a proposition to pay the Church $2000 on account of 
lease of the Kay Estate — #1000 in one year, and $1000 in two years, 
and renew the lease, so that the rent shall be in proportion to the 
old lease ; 

Voted : that the proposition be acceded to. 

Voted : that in future there shall not be any collection in church 
of the pew taxes, but that the Wardens be directed to have receipts 
printed, and give them to each proprietor on their paying their 
dues. 

August 4, 1 8 19. Voted: that the application of the Rev d Mr. 
Webb for the use of the Church school-house once or twice a week 
till the first of October next, for the purpose of the meeting of the 
singers of the Methodist Congregation, to practice singing therein, 
be, and the same is granted. 

October 10, 1819. Voted: that the Senior Warden be author- 
ized to purchase ten cords oak wood for the Rector, and have the 
same sawed and piled in the Parsonage cellar, and pay for the same 
out of the funds of the corporation. 

December I, 18 19. Voted: that in future no fire be taken out 
of the stoves on Sundays or Prayer-days. 273 



273 It had been the custom for many years for elderly ladies and persons 
in feeble health, to send a foot-stove to the Church just before the hour 
of service, where it was filled with live walnut coals from the stoves and 
placed in the owner's pew, An occasional gratuity made this, extra work 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 327 

Easter Monday, April 3, 1820. Robinson Potter chosen Senior 
Warden, W. H. Rathbone, Junior Warden. 

James Mumford, Treasurer; John B. Lyon, Secretary; Eliza 
Davis, Organist. 

Vestrymen: Edward Brinley, Benj. B. Mumford, S. T. Northam, 
Win. Crooke, Sam 1 Whitehorne, J. G. Whitehorne, John P. Mann, 
Levi Tower, J. Wood, Chas. Cotton. 

John Springer, Sexton. 

Voted : that the tax often dollars on each pew be continued. 

Delegates to the State Convention : Messrs. Edward Brinley, 
John P. Mann, S. Whitehorne. 

April 5, 1820. Voted: that Benjamin Hazard be requested to 
draw up such a deed, to be made by the Corporation to Mr. Harri- 
son, as he shall think will be proper for this Society to make and 
execute, and report the same to this Vestry. 

Voted: that the tax now due, and that may hereafter annually 
accrue and become due upon Dr. Waring's pew, in consideration 
of his professional services rendered, and to be rendered, the Rev d 
Rector and his family, be remitted. 

Voted : That the Sunday-school that now assemble in the organ- 
loft be requested not to meet there in future, and that the same be 
exclusively reserved for the accommodation of the organist and 
singers. 

July 8, 1820. Voted: that the Society of which John G. White- 
horne is a member, be and they are hereby authorized and per- 
mitted, to meet in the Church and use the organ in their perform- 



anything but a hardship to the sexton, who, to oblige all callers, fre- 
quently so reduced the quantity of coals in the stoves as to rob the con- 
gregation of the heat they had a right to look for. This abuse led to the 
above order, 



328 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 

ances, and that the Senior Warden be requested to make known to 
the Rector the object of this vote. 

August 2, 1820. Voted: that Robinson Potter, with either Benj. 
Hazard or Wm. Hunter, be a committee to make the arrangement 
with Mr. Harrison immediately. 

September 11, 1820. Voted : that the Rector and Samuel White- 
horne be a committee to make such arrangements for the accom- 
modation of the Clergy, that may attend the Convention, as they 
may think expedient. 

October 4, 1820. Voted: that the organist be requested to ac- 
company the organ with her voice in the voluntaries. 

November 19, 1820. At a meeting of the corporation, voted : 
that six cords oak wood be purchased for the Rev a Mr. Wheaton, 
and the same be sawed and piled in his cellar. 

December 8, 1820. Voted: that the indenture and the terms 
and conditions thereof be and the same are hereby agreed to and 
confirmed, and that Jas. Mumford, Treasurer of the Corporation, be 
and he is hereby directed to affix thereto the common seal of s d 
corporation and to sign the same in his said capacity, agreeably to 
the charter, to deliver the same to the said Richard Harrison, Esq., 
and to receive in exchange his part of s d indenture, duly executed. 

February 7, 1821. Voted: that the subject of the music be 
postponed until the next meeting of the Vestry, and that Doct. 
Mann be specially notified to attend. 

Voted : that a pew be selected by the Wardens for the accom- 
modation of John Handy's family, which shall be free of tax. 

April 4, 1 82 1. Voted: that the trustee of the Permanent Fund, 
the Senior Warden and the Treasurer, be directed to make out 
their accounts and inform the Auditors when made out and ready 
for their examination, so as to enable them to report thereon on 
Easter Monday. 

April n, 1 82 1. Voted: that the Rector be requested to direct 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 329 

the organist to sing the morning and evening hymns, if it meets 
his approval. 

Annual meeting of the corporation, Easter Monday, April 23, 
1821. 

Present: The Rector, Henry Bull, S. Fowler Gardner, Win. II. 
Rathbone, Henry Potter, Levi Tower, John G. Whitehorne, C. S. 
Hunt, James Mumford, S. H. Cahoone, Robt. Robinson, Rob'n 
Potter, H. S. Newcomb, Saml Whitehorne, Wm. Hunter, Chs. 
Cotton, Wm. Crooke, Edw. Brinley, Wm. C. Gibbs. 

The following gentlemen were duly elected officers for the year 
ensuing : 

Stephen T. Northam, Senior Warden. 

Wm. H. Rathbone, Junior Warden. 

Vestrymen: Edward Brinley, Benj. B. Mumford, Wm. Crooke, 
S. Whitehorne, J. G. Whitehorne, John P. Mann, Levi Tower, Rob'n 
Potter, Rob. Robinson, John B. Lyon. 

Steph. H. Cahoone, Secretary; Jas. Mumford, Treasurer; Miss 
Eliza Davis, Organist; salary, 380 per annum. John Springer, 
Sexton ; salary, $40 per annum. 

Voted : that the tax often dollars on each pew be continued, and 
that the Wardens rent the gallery pews. 

Delegates to the State Convention : E. Brinley, S. T. Northam, 
J. P. Mann and S. Whitehorne. 

Auditors : J. G. Whitehorne, S. Fowler Gardner. 

The Treasurer of the Permanent Fund made the following re- 
port, which was received and ordered to be recorded : 

PEWS IN TRINITY CHURCH, EASTER, 1821. 

No. Owners. Occupants. 

1 Church, George Cox, one-half pew. 

2 do John Tew, one-half pew. 

3 do 

4 do Mrs. Law ton and Miss Burdick. 

•12 



33° 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



No. Owners. 

5 Thomas Bush, 

6 David King, 274 

7 Mrs. Wickham, 

8 Mrs. Gardiner, 

9 Esther Freebody, 

io Estate of Jona. Almy, 

n Estate of Benj. Gardiner, 

12 Sarah Wood, 

13 Margaret Champlin, 

14 Margaret Champlin, 

15 Steph. T. Northam, 

16 Church, 

17 Mrs. John Langley, 

18 Church, 

19 Estate of Silas Dean, 

20 William Crooke, 

21 Church, 

22 Miss Dillon, 

23 H. S. Newcomb, 

24 Thomas White, 

25 Robinson Potter, 



Occupants. 

Thomas Bush. 
( David Melville, 
( John B Lyon. 
J Mrs. Wickham, 
1 Mrs. Miles. 
J Mrs. Gardiner, 
(. Mrs. Penrose. 
J Steph. H. Cahoone. 
1 W. Norris. 

David Coggeshall. 

B. Gardiner's family. 

Almy Wood. 

Margaret Champlin. 

Sarah Greene. 
{ Steph. T. Northam, 
1 Mrs. Burdick. 

Benjamin Brenton. 

Mrs. John Langley. 

Mrs. McKenzie, 

Mrs. Morgan. 

Miss Mary Dean. 
j James Gardiner, 
I Edw. C. Gardiner, 

Mary Easton. 

Miss Dillon. 

H. S. Newcomb. 

Thomas White. 

Robinson Potter. 




^^^ 




7 



Dr. David King was born at Raynham, 
Mass., in 1774, graduated at Rhode 
Island College in 1796, became the pu- 
pil of Dr. James Thatcher, of Plymouth, 
Mass., and in 1799 began the practice of 
medicine in Newport, the field of his usefulness during the rest of his days. The first 
person vaccinated in Rhode Island, Walter Cornell, was vaccinated by Dr. King. Dr. 
King was one of the first promoters of the Rhode Island Medical Society, and held in 
turn the offices of Censor, Vice-President and President. Stricken with paralysis in 
August, 1834, he gradually failed till November 14, 1836, when he passed away. 
Mrs. Ann Gordon King, his widow, survived till November 9, 1S52, when she died at 
the age of 70 years. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 



33* 



No. 


Owners. 


26 


Samuel F. Gardner, 


27 


Henry Sherburne, 


28 


Samuel Whitehorne, 


29 


Charles O. Handy, 




f Mrs. Wickham, 
( Mrs. Stewart, 


3° 


3 1 


Edward Stanhope, 


3 2 


Church, 


33 


do 


34 


do 


35 


do 


36 


do 


37 


do 


38 


do 


39 


do 


40 


do 


42 


do 


43 


do 


44 


Bannister Estate, 


45 


W. H. Rathbone, 


46 


Nicholas Geoffroy, 


47 


Henry Bull, 


4« 


Robert Robinson, 


49 


Estate of F. Malbone, 


5° 


Edmund T. Waring, 


5 1 


William Crooke, 


52 


Estate of F. Brinley, 


53 


Permanent Fund, 


54 


Church, 


55 


do 


56 


Permanent Fund, 


57 


Estate of F. Brinley, 


58 


Miss Susan Mason, 


59 


William Hunter, 


60 


Estate of F. Malbone, 


61 


Levi Tower, 


62 


Thomas Dennis, 



OCCUPANI 

Samuel F. Gardner. 
Henn Sherburne. 

Samuel Whitehorne. 

Thomas Hand) . 

Mrs. Wickham. 

Mrs. Stewart. 

Edward Stanhope. 

M. Sherman, one-half pew. 



Mrs. Townsend, one-half pew. 
( Russell Coggeshall, 
1 Catharine Thurston. 



Thomas W. Brown. 
( Miss Nicholi, 
( Miss Mayberry. 

Sarah Freebody. 

W. H. Rathbone. 

Nicholas Geoffroy. 

Henry Bull. 

Robert Robinson. 
( William Douglass. 
(. Susan Atkinson. 

Edmund T. Waring. 

William Crooke. 

Mrs. Fry. 

Mrs. Moore. 

Rector's Family. 

Lieut. Lyon. 
Mar) Staunton. 
Mrs. o. II. Perry. 
William Hunter. 
Mrs. Breese, 
Levi Tower. 
Mrs. Reece. 



33 2 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



No. 


Owners. 


Occupants. 




63 


Estate of Peleg Wood, 


Sarah Wood. 




64 


John G. Whitehorne, 


John G. Whitehorne. 




65 


Benj. B. Mumford, 


Benj. B. Mumford. 




66 


Henry Moore, 


Henry Moore. 




67 


William Crooke, 


James Mumford. 




68 


Church, 


John Handy. 




69 


do 






70 


do 






71 


do 


. William Rider. 






do 


f Paul Mumford, 
1 C. Bannister. 




72 




73 


John L. Boss, 


John L. Boss. 




74 


Andrew V. Allen, 


Andrew V. Allen, 




75 


Richard K. Randolph. 


R. K. Randolph. 




76 


Edward Brinley, 


Edward Brinley. 




77 


John P. Mann, 


John P. Mann. 




78 


Estate of George Gibbs, 


( Charles Cotton, 
1 P. Johnson. 




79 


Stephen T. Northam, 


S. T. Northam. 




80 


Estate of George Gibbs, 


| Wm. C. Gibbs, 
1 Mrs. Greene. 




81 


Jacob Smith, 


Jacob Smith. 




82 


John G. Whitehorne, 


Edward Martin. 




83 


Church, 






-84 


Sarah Freebody, 


Mrs. Mason. 




85 


Church, 


John W. Davis. 




86 


do 


Henry Tisdale. 




87 


do 






88 


do 


John B. Gilpin. 




89 


Mrs. Gibbs, 


Wm. C. Gibbs and Miss Greene. 


90 


William V. Taylor, 


Wm. V. Taylor. 




9 1 


John R. Sherman, 


John R. Sherman. 




92 


Estate of F. Robinson, 


Henry Potter. 




93 


do do do 


Benj. Hazard. 




94 


John R. Stanhope, 


John R. Stanhope. 




95 


Jeremiah Lawton, 


Jeremiah Lawton. 




96 


Church, 






97 


do 


Mary Wallace. 




98 
99 


do 
do 


John B. Atkinson, one-half 


pew, 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 333 



TRUSTEE'S REPORT. 

EXPENDITURES AND RECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF THE PERMANENT FUND 
TO APRIL 21, 182 1. 



Dr. 

To 61 Shares Union Bank, cost, 
"14 " Newport Bank, cost, 
" 8 " Bank of Rhode Island, cost, 
" Sundry expenses, . 

" Cash on hand, ..... 



S'>745-°° 

<>24.oo 

S 1 6.00 

6.82 

508.70 

$9000.52 



Cr. 
By Subscriptions, notes, collections at church, legacies and 

donations, $5933-76 

By Interest on shares in bank and on notes paid and renewed, 3066.76 



$9000.52 



Note. — Amount received as per account above, . $9000.52 
Sundry notes on hand, . . 5841.93 
Interest to April 21, 1821, . 227.00 

1068.93 

Amount due on subscription list, 165.00 

Interest to April 21,1821, . 86.00 

251.00 

Pew in church given by Mrs. Miller, valued at 50.00 



Total amount of Permanent Fund, . $10,370.45 

I do not consider that more than nine thousand, three hundred and 
fifty dollars of the above can be estimated as good. 
Signed, 

SAMUEL WIIITI'.IIORNE, Trustee. 



334 



ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



RECTORS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 



Rev. 


Mr. Lockyer, 


1698 to 1704 


Rev. 


James Honyman, 


1704 ' 


' 1 75°* 


Rev. 


James Learning, 


1750 « 


' x 754 


Rev. 


Thomas Pollen, 


1754 ' 


' 1760 


Rev. 


Marmaduke Browne, 


1760 ' 


« 1771* 


Rev. 


James Sayre, 


1786 ' 


< 1788 


Rev. 


William Smith, 


1789 < 


' 1797 


Rev. 


Theodore Dehon, 


1798 ' 


' 1809 


Rev. 


Salmon Wheaton, 


1810 ' 


' 1840 


Rev. 


Francis Vinton, D.D., 


1840 ' 


' 1844 


Rev. 


Robert B. Hall, 


1844 ' 


' 1846 


Rev. 


Darius H. Brewer, 


1846 ' 


' 1855 


Rev. 


Alexander G. Mercer, D.D., 


1855 ' 


< i860 


Rev. 


Oliver H. Prescott, 


1861 ' 


' 1863 


Rev. 


John H. Black, 


1863 < 


' 1866 


Rev. 


Isaac P. White, D.D., 


1866 « 


' 1875* 


Rev. 


George J. Magill, 


1876 ' 





SENIOR WARDENS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 



Nicholas Lange, 
Daniel Ayrault, 
Nathaniel Newdigate, 
Adam Powell, 
William Coddington, 
Henry Bull, 
Godfrey Malbone, 
William Wanton, 
Jonathan Thurston, 
James Martin, 
Jahleel Brenton, 
John Gidley, 
Samuel Wickham, 
Edward Scott, 
Daniel Ayrault, Jr., 



1709 t 





1719 ' 


' 1721 


1721 ' 


' 1722 


1722 ' 


' x 7 2 3 


1723 ' 


1 1724 


1724 • 


' 1725 


1725 ' 


' 1726 


1731 ' 


' I 73 2 


1732 « 


' J 733 


!733 ' 


' !734 


1734 ' 


' 1735 


1735 ' 


* 1736 


1736 ' 


' J737 


1737 ' 


' 1738 


1738 ' 


' J 739 



* Died while at the head of the Church. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 335 

William Mum ford, 1739 to 1740 

Joseph Wanton, 1740 " 1741 

John Bannister, [741 " 1742 

Peleg Brown, 1 742 " 1 743 

Philip Wilkinson, 1743 " 1744 

Stephen Ayrault, 1744 " 1745 

Thomas Wickham, 1745 " 1746 

William Paul, 1746 " 1747 

Walter Chaloner, 1747 •• [748 

Evan Malbone, 1748 " 1749 

Charles Wickham, 1749 " i-js° 

Walter Cranston, 1750 " 1751 

Robert Sherman, 1751 " 1752 

Jonathan Thurston, 1752 " 175s 



Thomas Vernon, 



J753 J754 



Edward Cole, 1754 " 1755 

Metcalf Bowler, 1755 " 1756 

Robert Jenkin-, 17-6 " 1757 

Joseph Wanton, Jr., 1757 " 1758 

Charles Handy, 1758 " 1759 

Andrew Hunter, 1759 " 1760 

Isaac Stelle, 1760 " 1761 

John Mawdsley, 1761 " 1762 

Benjamin Mason, 1762 " 1763 

Benjamin Brenton, 1763 " 1764 

Samuel Bours, 1764 " 1765 

John Jenkins, 1765 " 1766 

John Bours, 1766 " 1767 

Simon Pease, 1767 " 1768 

Francis Brinley, 1768 " 1769 

Francis Malbone, 1769 " 1770 

Peter Cooke, 1770 " 1771 

John Bours, 1771 " 1786 

Samuel Freebody, 1786 " 1789 

John Handy, 1789 " 1797 

William Crooke, 1797 " 1801 

Wm. R. Robinson, 1801 " 1803 

Samuel Whitehorne, 1803 " 1804 

William Littlefield, 1804 " 1810 



336 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



Samuel Whitehorne, 


1810 


to 


1814 


William C. Gardiner, 


1814 


tt 


l8l6 


Edward Brinley, 


1816 


a 


l8l8 


Charles Collins, 


1818 


i 1 


1819 


Robinson Potter, 


1819 


i i 


I82I 


Stephen T. Northam, 


1821 


a 


1823 


Samuel Whitehorne, 


1823 


a 


1828 


Edward Brinley, 


1828 


it 


1832 


George C. Mason, Sr., 


1832 


it 


1835 


Benjamin Finch, 


1835 


1 1 


1838 


Robert Johnston, 


1838 


1 1 


1839 


George C. Mason, Sr., 


i839 


1 1 


1842 


Samuel Fowler Gardner, 


1842 


a 


1843 


John H. Gilliat, 


1843 


a 


1845 


Samuel Fowler Gardner, 


1845* 






John H. Gilliat, 


1845 


it 


1847 


Edward King, 


1847 


tt 


1849 


Marshall C. Slocum, 


1849 


1 1 


1855 


George C. Mason, 


1S55 


1 1 


1859 


John H. Cozzens, 


1859 


1 1 


l86l 


Marshall C. Slocum, 


1861 


a 


1863 


George C. Mason, 


1863 


1 1 


1889 


LeRoy King, 


1889 


a 





JUNIOR WARDENS OF TRINITY CHURCH. 

Thomas Lillibridge, 
William Gibbs, 
Adam Powell, 
William Coddington, 
Henry Bull, 
Godfrey Malbone, 
John Freebody, 
Jonathan Thurston, 
James Martin, 
Jahleel Brenton, 
John Gidley, 

* Mr. Gardner met with an accidental death in the summer of the same year. 



1709 tc 


) 


1719 ' 




1721 ' 


' 1722 


1722 " 1723 


1723 ' 


' 1724 


1724 " 1725 


1725 ' 


4 1726 


I73 1 ' 


' 1732 


1732 ' 


' T 733 


1733 ' 


' 1734 


1734 ' 


' 1735 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 337 

Samuel Wickham, 1735 to 1736 

Edward Scott, 1 7 j;6 " 1737 

Daniel Ayrault, Jr., 1737 '' 1738 

William Mum ford, 1738 " 1739 

Joseph Wanton, 1 739 " 1740 

John Bannister, 1740 " 1741 

Peleg Brown, 1741 " 1742 

Philip Wilkinson, 1742 " 1743 

Stephen Ayrault, 1743 ' b 1744 

Thomas Wickham, 1744 " 1745 

William Paul, 1745 " 1746 

Walter Chaloner, 1746 " 1747 

Evan Malbone, 1747 " 1748 

Charles Wickham, 1748 " 1749 

Walter Cranston, 1749 " 1750 

Robert Sherman, 1750 " 1751 

Jonathan Thurston, 1751 " 1752 

John Jepson, 1752 " 1753 

Edward Cole, 1753 " 1754 

Metcalf Bowler, 1754 " 1755 

Robert Jenkins, 1755 " 1756 

Joseph Wanton, Jr., 1756 " 1757 

Charles Handy, 1757 " 1758 

Andrew Hunter, 1758 " 1759 

Isaac Stelle, 1 759 " 1760 

John Mawdsley, 1760 " 1761 

Benjamin Mason, 1761 " 1762 

Samuel Brenton, 1762 " 1763 

Samuel Bours, 1763 " 1764 

John Jenkins, 1764 " 1765 

John Bours, 1765 " 1766 

Simon Pease, 1766 " 1767 

Christopher Champlin, 1767 " 1768 

Franc is Malbone, 1768 " 1769 

Peter Cooke, l 1^9 " 1770 

Thomas Wickham, 1 7 70 " 1771 

Isaac Law ton, 1771 " 1781 

Francis Malbone, 1781 " 1789 

Robert N. Auchmuty, 1789 " 1797 



338 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Wm. R. Robinson, 1797 to 1801 

Samuel Whitehorne, 1801 " 1803 

William Littlefield, 1803 " 1804 

William Wood, 1804 " 1808 

Benj. Mumford, Jr., 1808 " 1810 

Edward Easton, 1810 " 181 2 

Robert Robinson, 1812 " 1814 

Henry Shaw, 1814 " 1816 

Stephen T. Northam, 181 6 " 181 7 

James Mumford, 1817 " 1818 

Samuel Fowler Gardner, 1818 " 1819 

Wm. H. Rathbone, 1819 " 1826 

Stephen A. Robinson, 1826 " 1828 

Stephen H. Cahoone, 1828 " 1838 

Christ. Grant Perry, 1838 " 1845 

Walter Nichols, 1845 " 1848 

John H. Cozzens, 1848 " 1859 

William G. Seabury, 1859 " 1861 

Charles Hunter, 1861 " 1862 

James Birckhead, 1862 " 1863 

Samuel Engs, 1863 " 1886 

Rodman Cornell, 1886 " 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 339 



OFFICERS OF THE CHURCH. 



Rector. 
Rev. George J. Magill. 

LeRoy Kim;, Senior Warden. 
Rodman Cornell, Junior Warden. 

Vestrymen 

Benjamin Finch. 
John H. Cozzens. 
William E. Dennis. 
Henry D. Deblois. 
Walter L. Kane. 
Philip Rider. 
John Ireys. 
Theodore R. Helme. 
V. Mott Francis. 
George Gordon King. 

William E. Dennis, Secretary. 

Philip Rider, Treasurer. 

\Y\i. Irving I.yom, Organist. 

W. G. SCHWARZ, Sexton. 



34o ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 



SILVER OWNED BY TRINITY CHURCH. 

Oz. Dwt. 

One Chalice, silver gilt, . . . . . . . 176 

One Paten, . . ... . . . . . 1119 

One silver gilt Paten, . . . . . . . 5 16 

The above from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 

in Foreign Parts, 1702. 
One Baptismal Basin, . . . . . . . . 5212 

The gift of Nathaniel Kay, 1733. 
One Flagon, from Mr. Kay, 1733, ..... 39 8 

One Flagon from Richard Perkins, 1733, . . . . 39 8 

One Chalice, with handles, ....... 23 o 

Not marked ; probably the piece given by Mrs. Catharine 

Malbone. 
One Alms Basin, ......... 22 3 

From Johannes Mulderi D. Guilielmi Bright. 
One Alms Plate from Mrs. Sarah Jones, . . . . 12 17 

Another Alms Plate, from the same, . . . . . n 04 

Two Chalices, from Rev. A. G. Mercer. Each, . . . 11 12 

One gold-lined jewelled Chalice and Paten, in memory of Daniel LeRoy. 
One gold-lined jewelled Chalice and Paten, in memory of Samuel Engs, 

late Junior Warden. 
Two Patens. 
One small Flagon. 
One gold-lined Spoon. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. ; M 



Charter of Trinity Church, 

WITH AMENDMENTS. 



State of Rhode-Island & Providence Plantations, 
In General Assembly, Oct. Session, A.D. 1816. 

Whereas, the Minister, Church-Wardens, Vestry and Congregation of 
Trinity Church in Newport, have preferred a Petition unto this Gen- 
eral Assembly, and for the reasons therein assigned, have prayed this 
Assembly to alter, amend and enlarge their original Charter of Incor- 
poration, granted them in the Year 1769, and "to extend the powers and 
provisions thereof, so as to suit the present state of the concerns; to 
enable them, with greater convenience, to manage and secure the Prop- 
erty and Funds of which they are now, or may be hereafter possessed. 
and to promote and establish the Worship of Almigh i v God, according 
to the discipline, rites, canons, usages, ceremonies and liturgy of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, in the United States of America: 

Section I. — Be it therefore Enacted, That the Minister, Church-War- 
dens, Yestry and Congregation of said Church, be, and they and their 
successors forever are hereby made and constituted, and confirmed to be, 
a body corporate and politic, with perpetual succession, by the Name of 
Hie Minister, the Church- Wardens, I estry and Congregation of Trinity 
Church, in Newport, and by that Name shall be able and capable in law, 
to sue and be sued, to plead and be impleaded, to answer and to be 
answered unto, to defend and to be defended against, in all Courts and 
places, and before all proper Judges whomsoever ; to take, receive and 
hold all monies and other property, real or personal, by voluntary sub- 
scription, contribution, donation or otherwise, and also all legacies and 
devises of real and personal estate ; and also to have, acquire, hold, 
occupy, possess and enjoy lands, tenements and hereditaments, goods 
and chattels, and property of every description, not exceeding in the 



342 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

whole Forty Thousand Dollars, and all and singular the estate and prop- 
erty aforesaid ; to lease, grant, convey or dispose of in such manner as 
they may judge best for the interest of said Corporation, to have and use 
a common seal, and the same to alter, or renew at pleasure, with full 
power and authority to make and ordain all such laws, rules, and ordi- 
nances, for the government of the Corporation, and the better manage- 
ment of the affairs thereof, as they or the major part of them, who may 
be present on due notification, may deem necessary and proper, provided 
the same be not repugnant to the laws of this State, and Constitution and 
Laws of the United States. 

Sec. II. — And be it further Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
all the Funds and Property now owned or possessed by said Corporation, 
be and the same is hereby vested in, confirmed to, and continued in the 
same Corporation. 

Sec. III. — And be it further Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
there shall be an Annual Meeting of said Corporation on Easter Monday, 
yearly and every year, at which meeting there shall, and at any other 
legal meeting there may be, if vacancies should happen, elected two 
Church-Wardens, who shall be ex-officio Vestry-men ; eleven other Ves- 
try-men, a Secretary, who shall also be Clerk of the Vestry, and such 
other Officers as may be judged necessary. And that legal meetings of 
said Corporation may be called at any time, by the Minister of said 
Trinity-Church, by either of the Church-Wardens, by any five Vestry- 
men, or any ten members of said Corporation ; and at any of the meet- 
ings aforesaid, any of the affairs and business of said Corporation may be 
attended to, transacted and performed. — And although said Corporation 
should not, from any cause or circumstance whatever, hold their Annual 
Meeting on Easter-Monday yearly, and every year hereafter, yet this Act 
shall nevertheless continue and be in full force, and Officers may be 
elected, and the affairs and business of said Corporation may be trans- 
acted and performed at any subsequent meeting which may be called in 
either of the modes before stated. 

Sec. IV. — And be it further Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
the Church-Wardens and Vestry-men elected by said Corporation, shall 
for the time being, have the entire and sole control, management and 
disposition of all the property and funds of said Corporation, in trust 
nevertheless, and for the use of said Corporation, for the sole support 
and promotion of the public worship of God, as in the preamble of this 
Act expressed, for defraying the incidental expenses thereof, and for the 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 343 

repairs of the Church edifice and its appurtenances. — That the said Cor- 
poration shall on Easter-Monday annually, or oftenerif it should become 
necessary, for the security of the property and funds aforesaid, elect a 
Treasurer, who shall keep fair and accurate accounts of the Property and 
Funds aforesaid, and of the management and disposition of the same; and 
shall attend when required, and shall have a right at all times to attend 
the meetings of the Vestry, and shall at every Annual Meeting on Easter- 
Monday, make a written statement, or report of the same, to the said 
Corporation ; and shall, when required by a vote of said Corporation, or 
by a vote of said Church-Wardens and Vestry-men, make further state- 
ments and reports of the same, and shall produce the books, vouchers 
and documents, containing the accounts and statements of the property 
and funds aforesaid, and the use, management and disposition of the 
same, which shall be open to their inspection and examination. — And 
the Treasurer, previous to entering on the duties of his Office, shall 
annually give satisfactory bonds to the said Corporation, for the faithful 
discharge of the duties of his said office. 

Sec. V. — And be it further Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
each Male Owner of a pew in Trinity-Church in Newport, or lessee or 
hirer of the same for One Year, or a longer time, and who professes to 
attend public worship therein, shall be a Member of said Corporation, 
and be entitled to appear and vote in all Corporation Meetings, and that 
in all such Meetings, eleven members shall be necessary to constitute a 
quorum. 

Sec. VI. — And be it further Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the 
Minister of said Church, shall be elected by the Corporation aforesaid, 
at a meeting of said Corporation legally called ; and the Minister by 
them thus elected, shall, as soon as may be instituted Rector, according 
to the office set forth for that purpose by the General Convention of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church as aforesaid. 

Sec. VII. — And be it further Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
the minister so elected and instituted Rector, shall thereafter, while he 
continues such, be ex officio a member of said Corporation, and when 
present, Moderator thereof at all meetings of the same. — That he shall 
have a right at any time, to inspect the Books and Records of the Cor- 
poration. — That it shall be his right and duty, from time to time, to state 
verbally or in writing, the condition of the affairs of the Corporation, and 
to recommend such measures as he deems advisable for its benefit, to the 
meetings of the Wardens and Vestry-men, at which meetings one of the 
Church-Wardens, or Senior Vestry-men present, shall be Moderator; 



344 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

and in all meetings of said Wardens and Vestry-men, seven Members 
shall be necessary to constitute a quorum, each Member being entitled to 
one Vote, excepting the Moderator, who shall only be entitled to give 
the casting vote. 

Sec. VIII. — And be it further Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
all donations made, or that may be made to said Corporation, or that 
ensue, or may ensue to their use, shall be strictly used and applied accord- 
ing to the intentions and directions of the donors ; and that all deeds and 
conveyances made by said Corporation, shall be made by the Treasurer 
thereof for the time being, when authorized by a recorded vote or reso- 
lution of the Wardens and Vestry, to which said deeds and conveyances 
the seal of said Corporation shall be affixed. 

Sec. IX. — And be it further Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
whenever any tax or proportion of money shall be assessed by order of 
said Corporation upon the pews of the said Church edifice, for the repairs 
of said edifice and its appurtenances, which are already or may hereafter 
be made, or for the expenses of said Corporation, such tax or proportion 
of money shall be paid by the several owners of such pews, agreeably to 
their respective assessments, and the rules and ordinances of said Corpo- 
ration ; and in case any owner as aforesaid shall, for the space of three 
months after the notice of any tax or proportion of money assessed as 
aforesaid, refuse or neglect to pay the same, the pews of such delinquents 
shall and may be sold by order of said Corporation, at public Auction, for 
the payment and discharge of such taxes and costs : Provided nevertheless, 
That such sale be previously advertised, at least thirty days before such 
pews shall be offered for sale, and the surplus money (if any) after the 
payment of such taxes and costs, shall be lodged with the Treasurer of said 
Corporation, to be paid over to such delinquents, or their legal Repre- 
sentatives, on demand. 

Sec. X. — And be it further Enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the 
Charter aforesaid, of one thousand seven hundred and sixty-nine, granted 
to the said Minister, Wardens and Congregation of said Trinity Church, 
and the subsequent amendments thereto, be, and they hereby are, with 
the assent and at the request of said Minister, Wardens and Congrega- 
tion, repealed, abrogated and annulled. — Provided nevertheless, That all 
acts legally done, and all responsibilities legally incurred, and all by-laws, 
resolves and regulations passed under said Charter and amendments, shall 
be and remain in full force and virtue. 

A true Copy : — Witness, 

SAMUEL EDDY, Secretary. 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 345 



AMENDMENTS. 



State of Rhode-Island & Providence Plantations, "i 
In General Assembly, June Session, A.I). 1819. j 
On the Petition of the Minister, Church- Wardens, Vestry and Con- 
gregation of Trinity-Church, in Newport. // was Voted and Resolved, 
That the Charter of Incorporation of said Church be so altered and 
amended, as the Minister or Rector of said Church may attend and be 
present at the Meetings of Wardens and Vestry of said Church, and when 
so present, shall be the Moderator of said Meetings; — anything expressed 
or implied in the present Charter of Incorporation of said Trinity-Church 
to the contrary notwithstanding. 

A True Copy : — Witness, 

HENRY BOWEN, Secretary. 



June, 1827. 

An Act providing for the investment of certain Funds, belonging 
to Trinity Church, in Newport. 

Be it Enacted by the General Assembly, That the fund heretofore raised 
by subscription, donations, legacies or otherwise, and intended by the 
subscribers, donors, &c, to be a permanent fund for the better support 
of Trinity Church, in Newport, and Now, with the interest thereon, 
amounting to the sum of ten thousand five hundred dollars, par value, 
being invested in some safe and profitable stock or stocks, or real estate, 
in the Name and right of the Minister, Church-Wardens, Vestry and Con- 
gregation of Trinitv Church, in Newport, shall remain so invested, 
together with all sum or sums which may hereafter be raised in the way 
or manner aforesaid, permanently and untransferable, except by the act 
of the Corporation at a regular meeting, with Notice of the business to be 
transacted ; which act, to be valid, shall require the presence and the con- 
curring vote of at least three-fourths of the whole Male members of said 

23 



346 ANNALS OF TRINITY CHURCH, 

Corporation, who shall at the time be owners of pews in said Church, or 
part owners, with authority in writing from a majority of all the part 
owners, to act in their stead ; one vote only to be given by any one 
member, or in behalf of any number of members owning one pew : and 
the said fund, in whatever manner the same may at any time be invested, 
shall remain unimpaired and undiminished by any act of said Corpora- 
tion ; and the accruing interest, dividends or profits thereof only, shall 
be at the disposal of said Corporation, agreeably to the terms of the original 
subscriptions. 

June, 1828. 

An Act in Amendment of the Charter of Trinity Church, in 
Newport. 

Section I. — Be it Enacted by the General Assembly and by the authority 
thereof it is enacted, That each white male owner of a pew or pews on 
either floor of Trinity Church, who professes to attend public worship in 
said Church, and whose pew or pews aforesaid qualify no other person 
holding a lease of the same, or in the occupation thereof, to vote accord- 
ing to this Act — And also the lessee or hirer of a pew on the lower floor of 
said Church, who professes to attend public worship therein, shall be a 
member of said Corporation during the time he continues so qualified, and 
be entitled to appear and vote in all Corporation meetings : and at all 
such meetings fifteen members at least shall be necessary to constitute a 
Quorum for business ; that no member shall be entitled to more than one 
vote, and that no pew shall entitle more than one person to vote at the 
same time : Provided, nevertheless, That no lessee or hirer of a pew or 
pews as aforesaid, shall be entitled to vote unless he is, at the time of voting, 
and has been for the term of one year at least, previous to such time of 
voting, possessed and in the occupation of such pew or pews, or some other 
pew or pews in said Church, and shall have paid all taxes that have been 
lawfully assessed and become due against the pew or pews that may qualify 
him as aforesaid ; and also the rent that may have become due ; provided 
such pew or pews belong to said Church or Corporation. 

Sec. II. — And be it further Enacted, That all future special Meetings of 
said Corporation shall be notified by reading the notice audibly and 
publicly on the Sunday previous to said meeting, at said Church, when the 
congregation is assembled for public worship, in the usual manner as here- 
tofore, at least four days previous to such Corporation meeting; which 
notice shall state the time and place of meeting, and the business pro- 



NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND. 347 

posed to be transacted ; and no business :ii su< h meeting, except what is 
so proposed in said notice, shall be legal ; Provided, nevertheless, That 
nothing herein contained shall affect the right to meet by adjournment of 
any legal meeting. 

And be it further Enacted, That the fifth Section of the said charter of 
Trinity-Church be and the same is hereby repealed. 



1 1 nk, 1847. 
An Acr in Amendment of the Charter of Trinity Church. 

Section I. // is Enacted by the Genera/ Assembly as follows, That each 
owner of a pew in Trinity-Church, Newport, who professes to worship in 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, shall be a member of said Corporation, 
and shall be entitled to vote either in person or by proxy in all Corpora- 
tion Meetings, and in all such meetings not less than fifteen members 
shall form a quorum for the transaction of any business. Nevertheless, no 
person shall be entitled to vote except all taxes legally assessed and become 
due upon the pew which qualifies such person to vote shall have been first 
paid. 

Sec. II. That all Special Meetings of said Corporation shall be called 
by reading in said Church a public notice thereof, on the Sunday next 
before any such meeting, and not less than lour days previous thereto, 
which notice shall state generally the business to be transacted. 

Sec. III. That the fifth Section of said Charter and all acts in altera- 
tion or amendment thereof, are hereby repealed. 



J \nuary, 1865. 

An Act in Repeal of an Act amending the Charier of "Trinity 
Church in Newport." 

// is Enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 

Section I. So much of the Act entitled an Act in Amendment of the 
Charter of Trinity Church, in Newport, passed at the June Session of the 
General Assembly A. D. 1842, as authorizing the voting by proxy in all 
Corporation Meetings is hereby repealed. 

NOTE.— There appears to be no Record among the acts of the General Assembly of 
.my Act passed in June, A. D. 1842, referring to Trinity Church. The date A. I '. 1842 
is evidently erroneous, and should be A. D. 1847. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



Arnold, Mrs. Edmund S. F., 


$ I o.oo 


Klapp, Lyman, . . . . 


$15.00 


Belmont, Mrs. August, 


20 00 


Lorillard, Louis L., . 


30.00 


Berry, Mrs. R. P., . . , 


5-00 


Magill, Rev. George J., 


10.00 


Brown, J. Nicholas, 


25.OO 


Magill, Rev. Geo. Ernest, 


5.00 


Bailey, Miss Annie S., . 


5.OO 


Malcom, Rev. Charles H., . 


5.00 


Bailey, Miss Josephine I., . 


5.00 


Moore, Rev. Wm. H., D.D., 


25.00 


Bliss, Mrs. Wm. B., 


5.00 


Metcalf, Mrs. Alfred, . 


10.00 


Beach, Mrs. C. N 


5.00 


McA., Mrs., .... 


5.00 


Collins, George, . 


IO.OO 


Matthews, Mrs. Nathan, Jr., 


5.00 


Clarke, Mrs. Mary H., . 


I. OO 


Miller, George MacCulloch, . 


5.00 


Clark, Rt. Rev. Thomas M., , 


5 00 


Norris, William, . 


25.00 


Chace, Henry J., . 


5.00 


Nightingale, Geo. G., Jr., 


12.00 


Cornell, Rodman, 


55-oo 


Nichols, Walter, . 


5.00 


Cushing, Robert M., 


10.00 


Otis Library, Norwich, Conn., by 




Cornell, Rev. John, 


5.00 


Jonathan Trumbull, . 


5.00 


Carr, George H., . 


5.00 


Potter, Rt. Rev. Henry C, . 


5.00 


Dennis, William E., 


5.00 


Powel, Mrs. Samuel, 


10.00 


DeBlois, Henry D., 


5.00 


Pell, Mrs. Duncan C, . 


5.00 


D. S., 


1. 00 


Pierce, Moses, 


5.00 


Douglass, Rev. Geo. W., D.D., 


. 10.00 


Riggs, William, . 


5.00 


Fearing, Daniel B., 


10.00 


Rider, Philip, 


5.00 


Francis, V. Mott, M.D., 


5.00 


Richmond, F. E., . 


5.00 


Gibbs, Theodore K., 


50.00 


St. Stephen's Guild, 


. 25.00 


Garner, Mrs. Thomas, . 


. 10.00 


Shields, Prof. Charles W., . 


5.00 


Griswold, John N. A., . 


5.00 


Sheldon, Frederick, 


5.00 


Gibbs, Geo. W., . 


. 50.00 


Sheffield, William P., . 


10.00 


Goodwin, Rev. Daniel, . 


5.00 


Tyler, George F., 


10.00 


Handy, Miss M. C, . 


2.00 


Tuttle, Rt. Rev. Daniel S., . 


5.00 


Hunter, Wm. R., . 


5.00 


Tompkins, Hamilton B., 


5.00 


Henshaw, Rev. Daniel, 


5.00 


Vanderbilt, Cornelius, . 


1 00.00 


Ireys, John, .... 


5.00 


Vestry of Trinity Church, 


100.00 


King, LeRoy, 


75.00 


Wetmore, Geo. Peabody, 


. 75-OQ 


King, George Gordon, . 


• 75 °° 


Woolsey, Miss Theodora W., 


5.00 


King, Mrs. Edward, 


125.00 


Zabriskie, Lansing, 


5.00 


Kane, Walter Langdon, 


10.00 







I N 1) E X. 



Adams. John, 49 
Albro, Samuel, IT 
All.ro, [sabel, 17 
All, Abraham, H>7 
Almy. Ami, :;- 
A I my. Benjamin, 101 
Almy, Joshua, 124, 127 
Almy. Jonathan, 268, 299 
Allen, James, 54, <>2 

Mien. John, 69 

\llen. Henry. Id- 
Allen, William, 111 
Allen, Thomas, 1 10 
Andros, sir Edmund, ID 
Anne, Queen, L8, 20, 2:;, 26, 28, 70 
Arcambal, ( 'il izen, 205 
Archer, John, !»7, 108, 128 
Arnold, Sarah, 29 
A mold, Joseph, 34 
Arnold, ( lapt. James, L63 
Arnold, < iomfort, 38 
Arnold, Benedict, 38 
Arnold, Josiah, 1<>i>, lt>7 
Arnold, Tin .mas, 187, 248, 263. 
Atherton, William, L70 
Atherton, Sarah. 170 

Auchmuty, Boberl N., L76, 187, 194, 195, 
199, 201, 202, 204, 206, 207, 208, 211, 217. 
219, 220, 221. 225, 226, 227, 238, 250, 257, 
264, 266. 269, 271. 275, 291, -nil 
Auchmuty, Arthur Gates, 177 

\,iehmuty, Samuel 0., 287,291, 293, 300 

Audinet, William, :.'i>7 

Ayrault, Daniel, 27, 28, 30, 34, ::7, 50, •"><;, 
57, 60, 66, mi. 106, 128 

Ayrault, Pierre, 11, 12, ::" 

Lyrault, Mary, 36, 56, 110, 131, 232 

An rault, Stephen. 61, 72, 77. 80, 81,97, 129, 
i:;i. 135, 136, L38, 1 12, L46, l 18, 1 I!'. 154, 
159, 102, 165, L67, 17-. 202 



Ayrault, Daniel, Jr., 68, 69,73,97, 102, 105, 

122, 125 
Ayrault, Samuel, 108 
Ayrault, Frances, <>, i:'>7 

Badger, Bev. Moses, I 11. 161, 164, 169, 17<i. 

172, 176, 195, 196 
Baen, Wm. ( '.. 248 
Bailey, Jonah, 69 
Baker, Dr. John, 17.".. 183 
Banks, Bathsheba, 17 
Bannister, John, 71. 103, 118, 125, 167, 

297 
Barber, Eenry, 1--. 222 
Barbut, Wm., 24, 25, 27, 28 
Bardin, Charles, m. 65, 66, 68, 70, 97, H>7, 

109, 11-, 12-. I 10, I 11. 1 16, I l-. 156, L57 
Barker, William, 17 
Barker, John, 24, 25 
Barker, Alice, 56 
Barker, Daniel. 299 
Baring, Charles, Jr., 209, 308 
Barzee, John, 55, 60, 64, 68, 98, 108, 132 
Bass, Bev. Edward, 17.".. 174,218,227,229 
Battar, Ignatius, 121. 12- 
Beach, Bev. John, 54, 100, 101, 102, 103 
Beal, Bichard, 110 
Bearcroft, Bev. Dr., 89, ill 
Beard, J., 108 
Beardsley, Bev. Mr., 193 
Beer, Bethia, 17 

I leer. < Miver. 72 

Bell, William. Ill 

Bell, Edward, 119 

Bell, John. 131 

Bellomont, sir Bichard, 10, 12, 13 

Bennett, John, 72 

Benson, Martin, 17. r > 

Berkeley, Bev. Geo., 16, 51, 58, 99, 139 

Berkeley, Lucia, 29, 52 



35° 



INDEX. 



Berkeuhead, John L., 208, 226, 228, 243, 

258, 284, 288 
Bernon, Gabriel, 11, 34 
Bernon, Hester, 31 
Bernon, Jean, 38 
Bernon, Sarah, 113 
Berriman, Dr., Ill 
Birckhead, Dr. Wm. H., 120 
Bird, Nathaniel, 124, 167 
Bisset, Rev. George, 48, 135, 136, 140, 141, 
142, 144, 147, 148, 150, 151, 152, 155, 158, 
159, 182 
Bisset, James, 158 

Blackburn, -, 48 

Bliss, Henry, 250, 251, 253 
Bliss, Clarke, 260 
Boit, Capt. John, 249, 266 
Boss, John L., 248, 275, 299 
Bourke, Richard, 167 
Bourke, John, 107, 128 
Bourne, Benj., 201 
Bours, Rev. Peter, 121 
Bours, John, 76, 102, 127, 131, 132, 133, 135, 
136, 138, 140, 141, 142, 145, 146, 147, 154, 
155, 156, 159, 162, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 
171, 175, 176, 177, 179, 181, 183, 184, 185. 
187, 209, 211, 212, 214, 216, 217, 219, 220, 
224, 226, 227, 229, 235, 236, 238, 240, 241, 
242, 244, 247, 250, 257, 258, 264, 265, 269, 
270, 275, 281, 292 
Bours, Ann, 72 
Bours, Abigail, 129 

Bours, Peter, 50, 54, 61, 62, 63, 84, 89, 91, 
97, 99, 100, 101, 103, 104, 107, 111, 115, 
117, 118, 119, 121, 178, 208, 210 
Bours, John, Jr., 247 
Bours, Samuel, 101, 107, 119, 125, 129, 130, 

146 
Bowden, Rev. Mr., 207 
Bowdish, Hannah, 17 
Bowler, Metcalf, 47, 107, 110, 111, 114, 127 
Breese, Major John, 159 
Brenton, Jahleel, 34, 50, 59, 60, 62, 63, 64, 
73, 89, 92, 98, 100, 103, 104, 107, 110, 115, 
122, 125, 127, 134, 135, 147, 155, 159, 226. 
Brenton, Benj., 56, 178, 202, 211, 226 
Brenton, Susannab, 61, 133 
Brenton, Abigail, 73 
Brenton, Ebenezer, 91 
Brenton, Sarah, 158 



Brenton, Frances, 100 

Brenton, Samuel, 125, 129, 163, 166, 167 

Brett, Dr. John, 49, 68, 97, 100, 104, 112 

Brett, Mary, 107, 225 

Bretton, Wm., 249 

Bridge, Ricbard, 139 

Bright, Wm., 20, 34 

Brinley, William, 11, 34 

Brinley, Francis, 56, 113, 117, 125, 127, 135, 
142, 143, 147, 148, 155, 159, 161, 162, 165, 
167, 168, 171, 176, 177, 178, 179, 182, 191, 
201, 202, 211, 215, 217, 219, 220, 226, 247, 
250, 258, 264, 266, 269, 270, 275, 282, 289, 
291, 299, 300, 303, 304, 305 

Brinley, Elizabeth, 170 

Brinley, Edward, 248, 257, 261, 264, 269, 
275, 291, 300, 308, 310, 311, 329 

Brown, John, 17, 24, 25, 30, 34, 50, 66, 69, 
89, 92, 98, 100, 103, 104, 105, 106, 110, 115, 
125, 128 

Brown, Jobn, Jr., 37, 45, 50, 131. 

Brown, Elizabeth, 17 

Brown, George, 53| 

Brown, Alexander, 63 

Brown, Peleg, 68, 73, 76, 77, 89, 92, 97, 100, 
104 

Brown, John, son of Peleg, 153 

Brown, Jane, 104 

Brown, Ann, 109, 147 

Browne, Rev. Marmaduke, 67, 105, 116, 
119, 120, 122, 129, 132, 138, 141, 143, 145, 
147, 148, 150, 151, 155. 210, 283 

Browne, Arthur, 145, 210 

Browne, Rev. Arthur, 105, 140 

Brown, Samuel, 247 

Brunson, Rev. Abraham, 226, 227, 233,234, 
240 

Bruce, Henrietta, 176 

Bull, Henry, 37, 50, 57, 62, 128, 137 

Bull, Henry, 325 

Bull, Sarah, 17 

Bull, Mr., 34 

Cahoone, Stephen H., 329 
Cahooue, James, 108] 
Callender, Rev. John, 38 
Callender, John, Jr., 49 
Calhoun, Floride, 272 
Caner, Rev. Mr., 70, 100, 140 
Carpenter, Hezekiah, 49 



INDEX. 



35 1 



( 'air, Mary. IT 
Carr, Elizabeth, :'.! 

< air. ( bleb, •">? 
( arr. Ann. ii.") 

( Sarter, Edwin, 11 

Carter, Robert, 99 . 

( artii'. Stanley, 24 1 

Chaloner, John, 97, 124, 128 

Chaloner, Nimyan, 68 

Chaloner, Ann, 128 

Chaloner, Walter. 85, B9, 92, 97, [100, 104, 
107, 127 

( lhamberlain, Mr., 25 

Champlin, Jabez, 99, 127, 161, 167 

( thamplin, Phebe, ldT 

champlin, Margaret, 200, 298 

Champlin, Christopher, 40, 117, 124, 127, 
134, 159, 162, 166, 167, 169, 171, 178, ITU, 
182, 190, 201.202. 208, 209, 211, 215, 218, 
219,220. -'•-'»;. 238, 241,247, 250 

( lhamplin, 1 reorge, 248 

Champlin, Christ. G., 298 

Channing, Wm, 201,223 

Chase, ('apt. John, 50, 52, 53, 56, ~>! 

< Ihesebrough, David, 18] 
Checkley, John, Jr., -lit 
Chilcot, Richard, nil 
Christan, Elizabeth, 168 
Church, Col., IT".' 
Claggett, William, 61,68 
( larkr. Sarah. 1 4^ 

( llarke, Jeremiah, 97, 107 
Clarke. Walter. 101 
Clarke. Sherman. 124, 128 
Clarke, Abraham L., 206 
Clarke. John, Jr.. 206 
Clarke. Lawrence, 258, 259, 269 
Coddington, Wm.. :;?. 38,50, 57, 62, 89, 92, 
!i7. !i-. 100, 104, 106, 11 1. L26 

< loddington, Thomas, 38 
( loddington, .lane. 17". 

< loddington, Mary. 167 

shall, Abigail, 167 
-hall, Almy Ann. 221 
i loggeshall, David, 107 

Shall, Sarah. 101 

Cole, Edward, '.»7. I'M. 106, 111 
Cole. Elizabeth, 117. 
Cole, Elisha, l L5 
c.le. John, 11.".. 221 



< . 



34, 



Collin-. Henry. 19 

Collin-, Mary, -.".'I 

Collins, John, 127, 204 

Colville, Lord, 134 

( lonkling, Jonathan, 73 

( 'oiieklin. Ann. 91 

( Ion way, Lieut, .lame-. 158 

Condy, Jeremy, \'> 

i ooke, Peter, 137, I 11, 1 12, L57 

Cooke, Silas, 107, 124, L62, 211 

Cooper. J., 108 

< Sooper, Rev. I>r. Miles, 1 11 
Cotton, Dr. Charles, 329 

< lowley, Joseph, 126, 169 

( lozzens, Matthew. 124, 1'27 
Cranston, ( inv. Samuel. 10, 15, 1 

(ii), 95 
Cranston, Elizabeth, 17. 95 
( Iranston, Mary. 25, 15 
( ran-toii. John, 25, 34, 15, 1 < >T 
Cranston, .lames, 36, 60,61, 63 
( Iranston, Frances, 60 
Cranston. Walter, 25, 85, 90, 91, 

li:., 122, 125, 128, 129 
Cranston, Thomas. 117, L22, L24, 

134, loo, 137, l 12, 155, 159, 162, 
Crawford, Freeh, v. S., 98 
Crooke, Robert, 85, 117. 124, 128, 
Crooke, William. B5, 199,204,211 

238, _M 7 . -Joit. 252, 257, 258, 261, 

265, 269, 270, 275, 291, 299, 300, 

312, 329 

Crooke. John. 248 

( Iroswell, < reorge, 124 
Cutter, Rev. & orge, 22, 42 
( utter, t reorge, 1 1 
( 'uttler, Penelope, K 



Davis, Eliza, 318, 329 

Davis, Samuel, 17 

Dansy, 

Dean, Silas, 248, 299, 300, 303,304, 305 

DeBlois, Stephen. 167, 186, 191, 202, 211, 

248 
Decatur, Stephen. 102 
Dehon, Rev. Theodore, D.D.,213, 214, 215, 

216, 222, 224, 227, 235, 236, 239, 240, 245, 

250, 254, 259, 263, 264, 267, 268, 269, 273, 

276, 280, 284, 285, 293 
Dehon. Wm., 319 



98, 


in,;. 


125, 


127, 


179 




133 




•.'17 


226, 


263 


264, 


305 


308, 



352 



INDEX. 



Dennis, Capt. John, 114, 128 
Dennis, Thomas, 247 
Dennison, Jabez, 243 
De Noailles, Marquis, 177 
Destailleur, Dr., 116 
De Ternay, Admiral, 177 
Dickerson, John, 35 
Dickinson, Ann, 177 
Dieskau, Baron, 120 
Doolittle, Mr., 242 
Dorden, Peter, 124, 171 
Drew, James, 124 
Dudley, Governor, 9, 12 
Dunbar, George, 52, 62, 69, 107 
Dunbar, Mordecai, 63 
Dunbar, Eobert, 108, 128 
Dudley, Mr., 147 
Duncan, James, 125 
Duncan, Mr., 167, 249 
Dupuy, Mary, 167 
Durfee, Eichard, 125, 129, 138, 141 
Dyer, Joseph, 203, 211, 226, 244, 250, 257, 
264 

Eames, Gilbert, 164 

Easton, Edward, 247, 266, 275, 282, 284, 

291, 293, 300, 305 
Eddy, Samuel, 254 
Eliot, Rev. John, 61 
Elliot, Eobert, 51, 107, 127 
Ellery, William, 38, 49, 154, 230 
Ellery, Benjamin, 298 
Ellery, Abigail, 33 

English, George, 146, 154, 159, 160, 162 
Evans, Dr. Edward, 142, 149 
Eyres, Eev. Nicholas, 118 
Eyres, Dr. Thomas, 148 

Fairchild, Major, 47, 131, 167 

Fayerweather, Eev. Mr., 129, 131, 145, 152 

Fenner and Crocker, 242 

Fenton and Cochran, 247, 249 

Ferguson, Adam, 167 

Fisher, Eev. Nathaniel, 173, 174 

Flower, Captain, 35, 37 

Fogg, Eev. Mr., 163 

Fortaine, Daniel, 107, 127 

Fowler, Sarah, 221 

Fowler, Samuel, 221 

Fox, Tboinas, 11 



Franklin, James, 93 

Freebody, John, 37, 50, 56, 73, 127, 156 

Freebody, Elizabeth, 73 

Freebody, , 35 

Freebody, Thomas, 97, 127, 159, 162, 166, 

178 
Freebody, Samuel, 97, 127, 149, 162, 166, 

167, 168, 171, 178, 183, 187 
Freebody, Sarah, 314 
Freebody, Esther, 113 
Freebody, Andrew, 218, 228 
Freebody, Sarah, 77 
Frost, Miller, 63 
Fry, Benjamin, 167 
Fryers, Ehoda, 157 

Gaines, , 95 

Gano, Eev. Stephen, 118 

Gardiner, Hannah, 38 

Gardiner, William, 38, 65, 124 

Gardiner, Joseph, 65 

Gardiner, Elizabeth, 124 

Gardiner, Dr. Sylvester, 181 

Gardiner, Benjamin, 167, 178, 221, 228, 238, 

248, 250, 253, 257, 260, 264, 269, 270, 271, 

275, 284, 287, 289, 291, 294, 300, 303, 305, 

306, 307, 308, 312 
Gardiner, Eev. John S. J., 212, 259 
Gardner, William, 17 
Gardner, Caleb, 17, 221, 247, 250, 252 
Gardner, Sam Fowler, 315, 326 
Gardiner, Samuel, 233 
Gardner, Thomas E., 248 
Gardiner, Samuel F., 266, 299 
George, Archimedes, 136 
Gibbs, William, 19, 20, 27, 28, 30, 34, 57, 65, 

114 
Gibbs, Elizabeth, 65 
Gibbs, Hannah, 65, 99 
Gibbs, George, 65, 108, 124, 127, 136, 159, 

162, 165, 167, 168, 171, 178, 182, 199, 201, 

202, 208, 209, 211, 215, 217, 219, 220, 226, 

238, 241 
Gibbs, William ('., •««, 320, 322, 329 
(iililis, John, 90 
Gibbs, Ruth, 132, 305 
Gibbs, James, 159, 162, 164, 177, 183, 187 
Gibbs, Mrs. Mary, 248, 297, 307 
Gidley, Madam, 34, 126 
Gidley, John, 45, 50, 62, 63, 64, 81 



INDEX, 



353 



Gidley, E., L07 

Gidley, Elizabeth, l".:; 

Gilman, Dauiel C, l!> 

Gilpin, John B., 239, 247 

Ginnedo, 1 >aniel, .Ml. ■.'.">:', 

Godfrey, Caleb, 68 

Goldsmith, Henry, L59 

Goldthwait, Samuel, 124 

Goldthwait, Amy. 167 

Gorton, Uriah, 238, 250, 2S7, 258, 264, 269, 

275, 293 
Gould, James, To 
Gould, Mary, 101 

< roulding, Mary. 17. 53 
Goulding, George, 34, 36, 50, 70, 128 
Goulding, M.. L06 

Grant, sir Alex.. 1-. i:;i 
Grant, Mrs. Abigail, 18 
Grant, Sueton, 49, L13, 131 

< rrant, Jane, 113 

< 1 rattan. Lady, 227 

< rraves, Rev. .lames. mi 
Grazillier, Ezekiel, 31 
Greene, Maj.-Gen.. N.. 166, 170 

< l-reene, Thomas, L67 

Grelea, John, 60, 63, 66, 68, 69, 70. T7. 90, 
92, L01, L02, 105. 11 I. L15, 117. 11-. L25, 
129,138, 111. 146, 154, 158 
Grimes. Capt. John, L69, 255 
Griswold, Rev. A. V.. 249,276, 318 

< rrosvenor, Thomas, L72 
Gyles, < lharles, 245 

Hadley, Thomas, 205 

Halliburton, Dr. John, 61, 133 

Halliburton, Br en ton, 158 

Halpin, Thomas, 167 

Hancock, John, L72 

Handy, Ann, 110, 164 

Handy, Capt. Charles, 73, L09, L10, L16, L28, 

137, L38, 154, 162, 164, L66, 167, 168, IT l. 

178, L79, L88, 191, 202 
Handy, Major John, L10, 167,187,194,195, 

199,202, 203, 208, 209, 211, •-'17. 819, 220, 

226, 238, 250, 257, 328 
Eandy, Thomas, 289, 291, 294 
Hark n ess, Thomas, 2 17 
Harris. William. 12 
Harris, Rev. Mr.. 22 
Harris, Col., 97, 134 



21, 
. 13, 



. 89, 
111. 
138 



Harrison, Peter, II I. 124 

Harrison. Richard, 204, 207, 208, 225, 240, 

•->.".:;. 254, 289, 304, 327, 328 
Harwood, Judith, 153 
Hast inn, James, 108 
Hastie, Elizabeth, 239 
Hay don, Samuel, :;i 
Hayley and Hopkins, 154 
Hazard, Sarah, 85 
Hazard, Nathaniel, 249 
Hazard, Benjamin, 299, 304, 327 
Heatly, Andrew, 131 
Head. Elizabeth, 17 
Hicks, Robert, 17 
1 1 i'l.-, Deborah, 17 
Hill, Prescilla, L02 
Holmes, James, L08, L28 
Hooper, I >r. Henrj . 29 
Honyman, Rev. .lam.-. L6, 17. in. -.mi, 

22, 24, 25, 27, 28, 30, 36, 37,39, 10, L2 

II, 50, .".7, 59, i.i). i..'. 64, 65,67,69, 70 

7H. 81, 84, 88, 91,92,93, -.'in. -.'17. :;i I 
Honyman, James, ■>7, l!». .".:;. .".I. 59, 7:: 

92, !»7. "in, 100, lu:;. mi. in."., inn. no. 

L15, 11-. L22, L25, L26, L32, 134, 135, 

I 12, llii. 1 17. I I-. L50, 17-.' 
Honyman. Elizabeth, 17. 95 
Honyman. Marx. 62 
Honyman. Penelope, 70 
Honyman, Susannah, 141 
Hopkins, Stephen, in. 53 
Howard. Mosi - 9fi 
Howard. Martin, Jr., 91, 96, L07, 110 
Howard, John, 245 
Howard, William. -.'71) 
Howland, Mary. 68, 221, 225 
Hubbard. Rev. Bela, '.'77, 278, 279, 281, 283 
Hubbard. Daniel, I!) 
Hudson, 'I'll. .mas. 224 
Hunt. Bathsheba, 29 
Hum, C. S., 329 
Hunter, Andrew. 97, lib. 117. 11-. L22, 124, 

127, i::i. 135, 1 17. 1 I!) 
Hunter, Dr. William. 120, 125, L27 
Hunter, William. 121, ■. , :;i». 234, 241, 251, 

257, 264, 312, 329 
Hunter, Henry, L62, 166, L67, L78.202, 21 I. 

249 
Hunter. Deborah, 107 
Hunter. Thomas R., 230 



354 



INDEX. 



Huntington, Countess of, 156 
Huntington, Joseph, 227 
Hutchinson, Ann, 115 
Huxham, Thomas, 65 
Hyude, Mr., 248 

Ingrahani, James, 108 
Iverson, Mary, 66, 246 

Jacohs, Joshua, 49 

Jacob, John Owen, 66, 67 

James, Peter, 126 

Jarvis, Et. Rev. Bishop, 240, 277 

Jeffers, -, 68 

Jefferson, Benjamin, 108, 128 
Jeffries, Thomas, 77, 81, 107 
Jenkins, Robert, 114, 115, 124, 127 
Jenkins, John, 124, 128, 130 
Jenkins, Joseph, 131, 132 
Jenkins, Jera F., 195 
Jepson, Capt. Johu, 102, 106, 128 
Jopson, Rev. Mr., 42 

Johnson, , 70 

Johnson, George, 45 

Johnson, Samuel, 49, 128 

Johnson, Rev. Samuel, D.D., 84,98, 99, 100, 

103 
Johnstone, Samuel, 124 
Johnston, Augustus, 91, 106, 127 
Jones, Thomas, 34 
Jones, John, 81 
Jones, William, Jr., 58 

Kay, Nathaniel, 27, 28, 34, 37, 50, 51, 61, 
63, 73, 76, 77, 84, 85, 90, 92, 120, 122, 130, 
132, 137, 141, 142, 143, 153, 157, 165, 168, 
176, 184, 193, 204, 205, 207, 208, 219, 225, 
226, 232, 240, 241, 250, 255, 289, 312, 315, 
316, 317 

Kay, Ann, 63, 89 

Keith, Rev. George, 14, 15, 94 

Keith, James, 124, 128, 148, 149, 159, 162 

Keith, Rev. Alexander, Jr., 152 

Kennedy, Mary, 65 

Kinlock, Cleland, 205 

King, David, M.D., Senior, 330 

King, David, M.D., 284 

Kuotchell, John Ernest, 116, 129, 138, 139 

Knotchell, Johanna Sophia, 142, 170 



Lance, Rev. Morrice A., 312 
Lance, John, 56, 58, 59, 68, 69, 108 
Lauge, Nicholas, 18, 20, 21, 22, 24, 25, 27, 

28, 35 
Langworthy, Lawrence, 63, 69 
Langworthy, Jonathan, 63 
Lawtou, Robert, 17 
Lawton, Elizabeth, 17 
Lawton, Isaac, 124, 146, 149, 154, 156, 159 
Lawton, Thomas, 159 
Lawton, Jeremiah, 127, 298 
Leadbethy, Hannah, 110 
Learning, Rev. Jeremiah, 85, 88, 89, 94, 

100, 101, 102, 109, 116, 130 
Learning, David Thomas, 102 
Lechmere, Nicholas, 124, 128 
Lechmere, Elizabeth, 167 
LeRoy, Esther, 12 
Lightfoot, Robert, 156 
Lightfoot, Frances, 156 
Lightfoot, Mary, 156 
Lillington, Capt. John, 128 
Lillibridge, Thomas, 11, 19, 20, 22, 27, 

28, 34 
Little, James, 17 
Littlefield, Win, 170, 203, 204, 211, 226, 

238, 241. 249, 250,257, 262, 264, 265, 269, 

275, 284, 288, 291, 300, 305 
Lockman, Major, 80 
Lock wood, Robert, 125 
Lockyer, Rev. Johu, 10, 14, 16 
Loudoun, Lord, 53 
Lucas, Augustus, 34 
Lucas Bathsheba, 45 
Lucas, Jane, 131 

Lyman, Major Daniel, 223, 234, 304 
Lyndon, Josiah, 49 
Lyon, John B., 320, 325, 329 

Mackentosh, Mr., 34 

Magee, John, 124 

Malboue, Godfrey, 37, 50, 54, 57, 60, 62, 66, 

89, 92, 100, 104, 106, 115, 116, 125, 127, 

128, 134 
Malbone, Evan, 85, 89, 90, 91, 111, 115, 125, 

127, 131, 135, 136, 137, 138, 142, 146, 155, 

159, 165, 229 
Malbone, Frances Sophia, 95, 166 
Malbone, Godfrey, Jr., 97, 110 
Malboue, Aleph, 113 



INDEX. 



355 



Malbone, Deborah, 120 

Malbone, Fran- -is. 85, 95, 124, L27, L35, L37, 

150, 155, 158. 159, L62, 163, L64, L65, L67, 

L78, l-.'. I-:'., 202, 203, 208, 211, 215, '.'17, 

226, 227, 229, 238, 239, 242, 248, 250, 251, 

252, 257, 263, 264, 265, 267, 269 
Malbone, Elizabetb, 158 
Malbone, Col. John, 162, L66, L67, L78, 202, 

205 
Malbone, Margaret, 85, 163 
Malbone, Francis, Jr., U>7 
Malbone, Edward <;., 205,259 
Malbone, Saunders, 208, 211, 226, 249, 250, 

257, 260, 264, 269, 275, 29] 
Malbone, Mrs. Catharine, 248, 255 
Mallett, Thomas, 11 
Manchester, Charles, 292, 302, 305, 308 
Maun, Dr. J. P., L64, '.'7:.. 291, 300, 329 
Marchant, Henry, 132 
Matignon, i;<\ . Mr., 261 
Mardenbrough, ( 'hrist., 157 
Markadore, 132, 148 
Martin. James, 38, 50, 53, 54,56, 59, 61, 63, 

65, 81, 127 
Martin, Simeon, •.':;::. 234, 236,239,241, -ilT. 

•.T.ii, -.'.-.I. 257, 264, 270, 275, 289, 291, 294, 

297, 299, 300, 304,305 
Martin, Edward, 305 
Martindale, Isaac, II. L2 
Mason, Daniel, Hi:.. 167,214 
Mason, Benj., 110, 119, L22, L24, 125, 153, 

157, 214, 232 
Mason, Dr. Benj., ■.'::•.' 
Mas,, ii. Mrs. Mary, 159 
Matthews, Mr.. :;: 
Mawdsley. John, 70, 85, 100, 1I-. 119, 122, 

125, 127, 130, 134, 135, L37, 138, 1 12, 1 17. 

1 18 
May, Mr..:; I 

Mayberry, Freeman, '.'lit 
McSparran, Rev. James, 22, 31, .'in. 38, 12, 

43, 65, 7ii. 91, 115, 177 
Mears, Mary, nil 
Merriam, Rev. Clement, •-'::::. 234, 235, •-'::«;, 

r.l. 238, 239, 240 
Meunscher, John, 163, nil. 170. 177. 183, 

1-7. -Jin. 202 
Miller. Rev. Mr., 22 
Miller. John, 124, 167, 239 
Miller, William. 205, "I- 



Miller, Marj E., •>:','.) 

Miller, Mrs. V, 249 

Miller, James, 127 

Miller, Polly, 298 

M,, llin, an, Richard, 139 

Moscroft, Rev. Mr., 21 I 

Moffat, Dr. Thomas, 91 

Moore, Thos. William, 293 

Moore, Henry, 258 

Morgan, Win. s„ l l!i, L50 

Morgan, John, 242 

Morton, Dr. Frankland, -.Mi. ::i 

Morris, Es( her, li>7 

Munday, Richard, 25,34, 51, 52,58,69, 107, 

126 
Muni ford, John, -",7. 195 
Mamford, Richard, 15, 59, 60, 62 
Mumford, William. 17, 69, ::. 81, B9, 91, 

92, 98, 104, 107, 115, 124, L25, 128, 134, 

1 35, 1 1-.', i in 
Mumford, Samuel, 1. 1 
Mumford, Peter, L24, L27, 167, Kin, 187,202 
M umford, Susannah, K>7 
Mumford, Benj., 167 
Mumford, Nathaniel, 126 
Mumford, Frances, 167 
Mumford, \im. 172 

Mumford, Edward, 127, 1-7. 199,202, 203 
Mumford, Mrs. Benj., 249 
Mumford, Benj. B., 269, 270, 275, 291, 300, 

305, ::n7. 310, 329 
Mumford, Thomas II.. 269, 292, 293 
Mumford, John II.. 299 
Mumford, James, •'!'-'!> 
Murison, Heathcote, 162 
Myles, Rev. Samuel, l I. L5, 18, 22, 12 
Myles, Rev. John, 22 

Neargrass, Susannah. 122 
Neargrass, I'M ward. 34, '■'■',. 38 
Neau. I'.lias, :;i 

NTewcomb, II. S., 329 

Newdigate, Nathaniel, 30, 31, '!7 

Newdigate, Sarah. 15 

Newlaml. Richard, 1 1 

Neumann, Henry. 59, 65 

N ichols, J, mat ban, 127 

Nicholson, Sir Francis, 10, 18, •.':;. 24, 27 

N orris. Capt. Win.. 330 

Northam, Captain, 120, 166, 167 



35 6 



INDEX. 



Nbrtham, Stephen T., 247, 261, 264, 267, 
269, 270, 271, 275, 288, 289, 291, 294, 300, 
303, 304, 305, 309, 310, 329 

Norton, John, 56 

Norton, Nathaniel, 63, 108, 164, 165, 210, 
239 

N'Pau, F., 290 

Nowell, Elizabeth W., 301 

Oliver, Capt. Eobert, 48, 63, 67, 128 

Olney, Col. Jeremiah, 232 

Olyphant, Dr. David, 203, 211 

Overing, Henry John, 124, 128, 177 

Overing, Mary, 167 

Owen, George, 80, 110, 111, 114, 115, 117, 

118, 128 
Owen, W. G., 108 

Page, Eev. Mr., 156 

Paine, Thomas, 11 

Palmer, Bathsheba, 47 

Pare, Mary, 31 

Parker, Rev. Samuel, D.D., 162, 163, 173, 

174, 191, 213, 217 
Patten, Eev. William, D.D., 230, 245 
Paul, Mr., 35 
Paul, William, 80, 81, 89, 92, 98, 100, 104, 

107, 115, 118, 125, 127, 129, 134 
Paul, Mary, 167 
Payne, L., 107 
Pease, William, 11 
Pease, Mary, 115 
Pease, Simon, 117, 125, 127, 133, 134, 135, 

137, 147, 149, 155, 158, 166 
Pease, Katherine, 163 
Peiret, Rev. Mr., 31 
Perchival, Charles T., 57, 59, 63, 64 
Perkins, Capt. Eichard, 61, 63 
Perkins, Edward, 77 
Perry, Oliver H., 203, 319, 323 
Perry, Eaymond Henry Jones, 203 
Perry, Sarah Wallace, 203 
Perry, Matthew James Calbraith, 203 
Perry, Christ. Eaymond, 203 
Perry, Sarah, 203 
Phillips, Mr., 107 
Phillips, Join. ('., 299 
Piggot, Eev. George, 22, 42 
Piggott, George. 37 
Pike, Samuel, 34 



Piper, John and Frances, 137, 227 

Place, Joram, 35, 77 

Plant, Eev. Mr., 22, 42 

Pollen, Eev. Thomas, 103, 111, 112, 113, 

114. 116, 118, 122, 145 
Pollock, Mr., 253 
Pope, Francis, 11 
Pope, Sarah, 17, 116 
Porea, Mr., 204 
Potter, James, 124 
Potter, Eobinson, 329 
Potter, Henry, 329 
Powell, Adam, 30, 35, 37, 113 
Powell, John, 113 
Price, John, 245 
Proud, John, 66, 115 
Pye, Ann, 108 

Eadcliffe, Eev. Eobert, 9.22 

Eandolph, Eichard K., 234 

Eathbone, Wm. H., 72,329 

Eead, Mary. 224 

Eead, John, 236. 241 

Eead, Dr. Wm., 269 

Eedwood, Abraham, 116, 151 

Eedwood, Abraham, Jr., 141 

Eedwood, William, 116 

Redwood, Abigail, 167 

Redwood, Mrs. Jonas, 184 

Rhodes, Samuel, 232 

Eoach, James, 124 

Eobineau, Marie, 30 

Eobiueau, Judith, Ml 

Eobinson, Eobert, 72, 266, 300, 305, 329 

Eobinson, Ann, 248 

Eobinson, Francis, 297 

Eobinson, Wm. E., 164, 208, 211, 217, 220, 

226, 228, 2:;:;. 238, 243 
Robinson, Eowland, 164 
Robinson, Sarah Ann, 221 
Robinson, James, 221 
Eobinson, William C, 227, 228 
Robinson. Mary. 230 
Rodman, .John, 288, 289, 312 
Rogers. < 'on tent, 106 
Rome, George, 154 
Russell, Thomas, 110, KM. 219 
Rutledge, John. 221 

Saltenstall, Gurdou, 130 



wnrx. 



357 



Saltenstall, Winthrop, L30 

Sanford, Ezbon, '.'■'• 

Sanford, Martha, l L8 

Sayre, Rev. James, L80, 181, L82, L84, L85, 

186, 188, 189,292 
§cott, Edward, 19,54,55,56,60,62, 63,66, 
68, 73, 76, 89. 96, 99, LOO, L01, L04, L07, 
111. 115, 117. 118, L22, L25, L27, L34, L35, 
1 L8 
Scott, Mary, 61, 268,298 
Sc.tt, George, 61, 66, 68, L31, L61, 164, L66, 

L67, 171, L76.201 
Scott, Joseph, L25 
Scott. Aim. L64 
Scott, Elizabeth, 167 
Scott, John K.. 249 
Seabury, Rev. Samuel, 31 
Seabury.Et. Rev. Bishop, 90, L72.179, L82, 

186, 188, 1!"!. 198, 205, 240,278 
3eai ni-, James, 49, 101 
Searing, Abigail, 51 
Searing, Miss, 232, 234 
Seixas, Moses, •-'■"'1 
Selby, William. 157, 158 
Senter, Dr. Isaac, 232, 248 
Shaw, William, 167 
Shaw. 1 1, my. 305, 307, 310 
Shearman, Benj., IT 
Shearman, Mary. 17 
Shearman, Robert, 91, 96, 100, L07, 127 
Sherman. John R., 299 
Sherburne, Col. Henry, L64, 172, 203, 204, 
211, 223, 226, 242, 249, 250, 251, 257, 258, 
264,265,269, 270, 271,275,276,291, 293, 

Sheldon, Daniel, 223, 306 

Simons, Martha, 25 

Simpson. Wm. Brooks, 153 

Singleton, Major Anthony. 204 

Skinner, Katherine, 299 

Smith. Rev.Wm., 184, 189, 190, 191, L92, 

L94, 195, 196, L97, 201, 203, 206, 207, 209 

210, 232 
Smith, Capt. Jacob, 219, 247, 264, 269 
Snell, Job, 108, L28 
Sowdey(? , John, 97 
Sorento, < Satharine, 1 IT 
Spooner, Charles, 136 
Spooner, Jethro, 136 
Springer, John, 202, 300, 305, 329 



Stanhope, Henry Edwyn, 163 

Stanton, Penelope, 17 

Starke, < teneral, 164 

Stelle, Isaac 70, L07, 117, L18, 128 

Stewart, Mrs. Jane, 299 

Stewart, Nancy, 299 

Stiles, Rev. Ezra, D.D., 103, 155,230 

Stoddard, Robert, 115, 124, L27, L67 

Sturgis, Rebecca, l"' 1 

Sweet, 'apt. Samnel, 127, L67 

Sylvester, Margaret, 18 

Sylvester, Joseph, 1!» 



Taggart, Henry, L08 
Talbot, Rev. Mr., 1 1 
Tate, William. 66, 178, 187, 218, 243, 244, 

246, 255, 259 
Taylor, Thomas '1'., 96, 128, '-'I!! 
Temple, sir Granville, 221 
Tew, James, Jr., 136 
Thompson, Jerusha, 102 
Thurbor, < latharine, IT 
Thurston, Capt. Jonathan, 50, 54, 59, 60, 

.;:;. 89, 92, 100, 102, L07, 114, 1 r< 
Thurston, John, 97, 107, 127 
Thurston, Rev. Gardiner, 11-. 161, 164 
Thurston, Elizabeth, 164 
Thurston, Mary, KiT 
Tilley, William, 201, 202 
Tillinghast, Mary. 98 
Tillinghast, Judith, 268 
Tillinghast, John, 137, 138, 154 
Touche, Chevalier de la, L62 
Tow,,-. Levi, 287, 291, 293, 300, 301, 307, 
308, 329 

Towle, Floride, 284, 288,292, 317, 318 

Townsend, Nathan. Jr., 19 

Townsend, Solomon, 100, 124, 127 

Townsend, Thomas, 249 

Townsend, Frances, l.M 

Trevett, Eleazer, 270 

Trowbridge, Judge, 132 

Tweedy, John, 98, 108, 128 

Tweedy, William, 163, 166, 172 

Tweedy. Catharine, HIT. 31 1 

Tyrrell, ThomasTromp, 169,255 

Updike, Daniel, 29, 19,50,62, 107, 126,127, 
L64 



358 



INDEX. 



Usher, Rev. Mr., 42 
Usher, John, 195 

Veates, Robert, 122 

Velvin, Sarah, 52 

Vernon, Thomas, 97, 102, 104 

Vernon, Samuel, 203 

Vernon, Daniel, 177, 183, 187,202,208,211, 

226, 238 
Vernon, William, 153, 157, 171 
Vials, John, 108 

Vickars, Thomas, 77, 90, 92, 97, 101, lo2, 105 
Vilernaas, M. de, 162 

Wady, James, 80, 81 
Wallace, John, 49 
Waiuwood, Godfrey, 167, 312 
Wanton, George, 33, 37, 53, 54, 76, 81 

89, 92, 97, 102, 127, 299 
Wanton, Abigail. 33, 148 
Wanton, William, 33, 34, 50, 52, 57, 115, 
Wanton, Edward, 52, 137 
Wanton, Benjamin, 61, 107 
Wanton, Joseph, 69, 71, 77, 89, 92, 100, 

107, 110, 115, 122, 125, 127, 128, 130, 

135, 140, 142, 146, 148, 159, 175 
Wanton, Win. Gardner, 107 
Wanton, Joseph, Jr., 115, 116, 117, 124, 

131, 135, 155, 158, 159, 170 
Wanton, Catharine, 115 
Wanton, Ann, 130 
Wanton, Gideon, 137 
Wanton, Sarah, 167, 170 
Wanton, Stephen A., 227 
Ward, Thomas, 49, 73, 81, 113 
Ward, Henry, 108, 113 
Ward, Samuel, 113 
Ward, Rev. John, 229, 240, 249, 254, 

267, 270, 279, 284 
Waring, Dr. E. T., 166, 248, 298, 321, 3: 
Waterhouse, Benjamin, 203 
Webb, Rev. Mr., 319, 326 
Webber, Thomas, 167 
Wells, St. Charles, 203 
Welton, Rev. Dr., 42 
West, Henry, 80 
Weston, William, 54 
Wheaton, Rev. Salmon, 1),1)., Ii7, L93, 

278, 280, 281, 283, 284, 290, 292, 301, 

305, 306, 307, 30!), 315, 317. 31!), 325, ! 
Wheatley, Robert, [08, 128, 220, 221, 2 



.-5, 



159 



104, 
134, 



125, 



303, 
328 

38 



Wheeler, Rev. Willard, 150, 155, 158 
Wheelwright, John H., 298 
Whipple, Joseph, 97, 103, 107 
White, Capt. Nicholas, 69 
Whiting, Col. Wm, 50, 127 
Whitehorne, John, 77, 107, 128, 245 
Whitehorne, Samuel, 152, 203, 228, 238, 

249, 264, 275, 276, 280, 282, 288, 289, 290, 

291. 294, 300, 303, 305, 308, 311, 329, 333 
Whitehorne, John G., 245, 258, 291, 300, 

301, 305, 309, 327, 329 
Wigneron, Dr. Charles A., 103, 128 
Wilcocks, Jeremiah, 17 
Wickham, Thomas, 45, 80, 81, 89, 90, 92, 

96, 100, 104, 107, 115, 127, 134, 135, 142, 

146, 159, 166, 178, 199, 201, 202, 208, 211, 

217 
Wickham, Samuel, 49, 54, 62, 63, 64, 66,84, 

89, 97, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 107, 127, 139 
Wickham, Beuj., 124, 127 
Wickham, Thomas J., 141, 149 
Wickham, D., 191 
Wickham, Charles, 89, 90, 92, 96, 100, 104, 

115, 122, 125, 127, 134, 135, 136, 138, 142, 

148, 155, 159, 162, 165, 167, 178, 186 
Wilder, William, 245, 248 
Wilkinson, Philip, 73, 7<i, 77, 79, 106, 110, 

114, 115, 125, 128, 134, 135, 142, 146 
Wilkinson, Abigail, 110 
Williams, Roger, 12 
Wiseman, don Josef, 252 
Wood, Peleg, 167, 257 

Wood, Peleg, Jr., 247, 250, 263, 264, 266, 269 
Wood, William, 291, 248, 250, 257, 258, 261, 

264 
Wood, John, 248, 269, 275, 291, 300, 305 
Wood, Joseph, 298 
Wood, Beuj. W., 298 
Woodell, Gersham, 17 
Woodell, Ruth, 17 
Woodell, Susannah, 17' 
Wright, George, 187 
Wrightingham, Robert, 11 
Wrightington, Mrs. Margaret, 34 
Wyatt, David, 66 
Wvdown, Samuel, 318 

Y. ans, John, 246, 248, 258, 289 

Xoung, Mary, 224